Cutting large holes in ply with jigsaw

On 09/05/2013 10:57, Mark Rogers wrote:

wife-friendly than buying a new tool, and it turns out that you can get a fairly reasonable jigsaw for £20 (and blades are cheap too). For cutting one hole then putting the tool on the shelf it's a lot easier to justify!

not doing too badly! But both of those have been used extensively already so they're easy to justify.)

The costs of tools is cheap when compared to getting a man in. It's easy to justify any cost on that basis alone.
Even if the tool does collect a little dust, the resale value of a pristine tool isn't bad.
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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 1:54:40 PM UTC+1, Fredxx wrote:

I know, that's how I got the router and nail gun :-)
The cost isn't really the issue to be honest, it's more that I don't have space to keep all the tools and I can't make arguments about her shoes if I have a garage full of tools I really wanted but have never worn^H^H^H^Hused...
Mark
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On 09/05/2013 10:57, Mark Rogers wrote:

Errrm. No you can't. All you will get for £20 is absolute sh*te.

Cheap blades are - cheap. But generally useless.

--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On 09/05/2013 10:57, Mark Rogers wrote:

Ah, but you could have argued that a decent jigsaw that will cut round holes well, is north of £100, and you can get a decent router for that!

--
Cheers,

John.
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Make a rectangular frame from four battens, that's a good fit round the sole plate of the jigsaw. Attach the radial arm in line with the cutting edge of the blade.
--
Mike Barnes

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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 9:46:27 AM UTC+1, Mark Rogers wrote:

.
excuse to buy a cheap (£20) B&Q jigsaw which has a straight edge guide, and tried a couple of test cuts with the edge guide which were pretty good (no reason why they wouldn't be).

de-down into the jigsaw and put a screw through that hole into the ply, the idea being that this would guide the jigsaw in a nice circle. (Having firs t drilled a hole in the ply for the blade, of-course!)

pulled towards the centre of the circle, bending the blade (pulling it away from the guide wheel) and jamming. I have tried different blades, differen t speeds, even adjusting the footplate to different angles. I tried clampin g the wood and moving the jigsaw, and I tried holding the jigsaw stationary and moving the wood. The result is always the same.

trying to continue in a straight line) but bending inwards makes no sense t o me at all.

better ways to do the job) welcomed!
I never found this method of cutting a circle worth a rats ass and I've tri ed with Bosch's pukka circle attachment.
Same goes for circle cutting jigs on a band saw.
I prefer to do it by hand and eye. Its not difficult. Make sure you have a good quality SHARP blade and go very slowly. You can neaten it after with a sanding block
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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 11:06:30 AM UTC+1, fred wrote:

Based on the comments here I'm definitely going to try freehand and see where I end up. Like I said elsewhere it doesn't have to be pretty!
Mark
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On Thu, 9 May 2013 05:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Mark Rogers

If it's just an access hole and isn't normally seen, why not just cut it as a square or rectangle? Then it would be easier to make a little lid if you wished to cover up the hole.
--
Frank Erskine

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On 09/05/2013 14:19, Frank Erskine wrote:

Agreed. Cut it rectangular & fit a nice neat plastic access panel. http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Access+Panel/p49803
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 4:31:05 PM UTC+1, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Good idea; I'll look at this option.
Mark
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On 09/05/2013 09:46, Mark Rogers wrote:

excuse to buy a cheap (£20) B&Q jigsaw which has a straight edge guide, and tried a couple of test cuts with the edge guide which were pretty good (no reason why they wouldn't be).

upside-down into the jigsaw and put a screw through that hole into the ply, the idea being that this would guide the jigsaw in a nice circle. (Having first drilled a hole in the ply for the blade, of-course!)

pulled towards the centre of the circle, bending the blade (pulling it away from the guide wheel) and jamming. I have tried different blades, different speeds, even adjusting the footplate to different angles. I tried clamping the wood and moving the jigsaw, and I tried holding the jigsaw stationary and moving the wood. The result is always the same.

trying to continue in a straight line) but bending inwards makes no sense to me at all.

A number of years ago I used a router to cut the tops of some fences to a nice semi-circle. Then the router fell apart. So I finished off the remaining ones with a jigsaw and a piece of string. Worked remarkably well.
--
Rod

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On Thu, 09 May 2013 01:46:27 -0700, Mark Rogers wrote:

Depending on the finish required, for an 8" hole, lacking the correct tools, my approach would be to drill a series of holes in a circle, and just nip through them with a small fretsaw, and file to size.
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Mark Rogers wrote:

excuse to buy a cheap (£20) B&Q jigsaw which has a straight edge guide, and tried a couple of test cuts with the edge guide which were pretty good (no reason why they wouldn't be).

upside-down into the jigsaw and put a screw through that hole into the ply, the idea being that this would guide the jigsaw in a nice circle. (Having first drilled a hole in the ply for the blade, of-course!)

pulled towards the centre of the circle, bending the blade (pulling it away from the guide wheel) and jamming. I have tried different blades, different speeds, even adjusting the footplate to different angles. I tried clamping the wood and moving the jigsaw, and I tried holding the jigsaw stationary and moving the wood. The result is always the same.

trying to continue in a straight line) but bending inwards makes no sense to me at all.

I do it all the time maybe you need narrower blades (not in thickness, the other way)
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writes

Yes. Widest practical kerf and narrow blade.
--
Tim Lamb

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On 10/05/2013 08:58, Tim Lamb wrote:

Like what I use for nearly everything. Leaves a rough edge but sails through the most intricate cuts in pretty much any thickness
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