Concrete with small size aggregate

I am looking for a concrete that contains small size "stones". Is there such a thing? fine concrete is a different thing altogether I have found.

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Broadback wrote:

Get a bag of "grano to dust" from you local builders merchant and mix your own
<https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/bagged-sand-and-aggregates/travis-perkins-grano-dust-trade-pack-6mm/p/996251
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On 18/05/2020 14:24, Broadback wrote:

Get a bag of pea shingle, some sand and some cement and away you go. Sharp sand might be better.
Any decorative aggregate from an English Garden Centre might by suitable, unless it is a critical application.
https://www.totalconcrete.co.uk/concrete-grades/
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If what you are looking for is a premixed bag of aggregate (stone and sand) round here referred to as ballast I would not bother as the mixes and aggr egates are very variable as the Paving Expert says “the sweepings o ff the yard floor”. Ballast is OK where finish and quality is unimp ortant footings and post holes come to mind.
If this is for your path/drive then you want to be sure about the quality w hich means buying the aggregates separately and mixing them accurately by v olume. The best coarse aggregate for concrete is angular limestone chips @ 20mm for general purpose concrete. If you require a finer mix go for 10mm o f the same. Make sure the chippings are angular in other words not rounded like pebbles the stones then tend to “lock” together for a stronger result. For the fine aggregates use sharp sand not builders sand. Go to the paving expert website for what proportions of coarse and fine agg regates to use plus cement.
Richard
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On Mon, 18 May 2020 14:24:13 +0100, Broadback

Can you not make up your own. Get a bag or ten of ready-mix mortar, bags of 'stones', size of your choice, and combine as appropriate?
--

Chris

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On 18/05/2020 14:40, Chris Hogg wrote:

It is difficult to find the correct size gravel as it is not possible to visit any D-I-Y emporiums. However I will rty the suggestions given.
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On 18/05/2020 14:47, Broadback wrote:

Are you anywhere near Brighton ?. Plenty of aggregate on the beach. Just give it a good wash :-)
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On Mon, 18 May 2020 14:47:54 +0100, Broadback

You might try garden centres. They usually do grits and grit-sands in a range sizes for potting etc. I guess it depends on how much you want.
--

Chris

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On 18/05/2020 14:24, Broadback wrote:

I find ordering "all in one ballast" usually does it. Locally that is a mixture of sharp sand and stones of varying sizes from fine to small pebble. Mix at about 5:1 by volume with cement for a general purpose concrete.
(although note the term ballast has regional variations - some seem to only apply it to coarse stones on their own, like that used for railway track ballast)
--
Cheers,

John.
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On Monday, 18 May 2020 14:23:50 UTC+1, Broadback wrote:

The size of aggregate requires depends on the thickness of the concrete. Thinner concrete = smaller aggregate. 10/1 is about right
ie 10mm aggregate for 100mm thick concrete.
You can buy it premixed, eg 10mm down to dust, only the cement needed to be added. In bags or loose if in large amounts.
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