Cladding a block wall

Some months back I asked about suitable ways of doing this, and received lots of helpful replies and advice. I've now acquired some reclaimed Welsh roofing slates which I plan to use to make the three-course block wall in my garden look a bit less industrial. I don't want to hang them overlapping, as on a roof, but simply flat onto the blocks, brick-like.
I'd welcome suggestions as to the best method of fixing them. A bed of mortar? One of the weatherproof gun-glues? Waterproof tile adhesive? Nailed to battens screwed to the blocks? Another way I haven't thought of?
Many thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/11/2014 12:49, Bert Coules wrote:

If the wall has a capping of some kind, you might get away with tile adhesive but, if water gets behind the slates, you'll need fixings
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stuart Noble wrote:

Thanks for that. Would even waterproof tile adhesive be vulnerable?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 7, 2014 1:20:24 PM UTC, Bert Coules wrote:

I used waterproof tile adhesive to fix some brick slips externally to form a soldier course over a RSJ boxed in with cement board (it was Rolled Steel - from the 1930s !). I then pointed them up like bricks (they were about 20 thick). Thinner slate might be more vulnerable and also nearer the frost, but if the capping stops water running down behind the tiles it should be OK. I mean, tiled swimming tools last a few years.
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 7, 2014 3:06:22 PM UTC, sm_jamieson wrote:

They tend not to freeze up though.
Jonathan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jonathan - show quoted text - They tend not to freeze up though/q
:-)
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 7, 2014 12:49:51 PM UTC, Bert Coules wrote:

I'd use 1:1:6
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
/ I'd use 1:1:6/q
Mmm a weak sand lime cement mix on a vertical application of dissimilar materials ?
Well I suppose if you are short of things to re-do.....
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, November 8, 2014 8:43:21 AM UTC, JimK wrote:

shaking head
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/11/2014 11:27, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Of course, anybody should have realised you were giving the ratios of ox blood, horsehair and cow dung :-)
--
Colin Bignell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
/Of course, anybody should have realised you were giving the ratios of ox blood, horsehair and cow dung :-) /q
Or armchair filling, pubes & bullsh.....:-)
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's good reason for doing them overlapping. Almost any other way will fail due to frost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
/ Almost any other way will fail due to frost./q
Mmm that well known ancient roofing material usually laid with roughly 3/4 edges exposed to all the elements for 100s of years is suddenly going to 'fail' because it's hung vertically.......
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It isnt the roofing material that might fail but the way its attached, stupid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/11/2014 12:49, Bert Coules wrote:

One of the new generation grab adhesives like Stixall
http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Adhesives+Sealants/d180/Grab+Adhesive/sd3199/Stixall+Adhesive+Sealant+290ml/p69243
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to everyone for the replies. Dave, that Stixall sounds ideal, even if it would work out very expensive for even my modestly-sized wall. But could I get away with a dot-and-dab approach, do you think, rather than spreading an overall layer?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
/ But could I get away with a dot-and-dab approach, do you think, rather than spreading an overall layer? /q
Most definitely, decent blob evey 4inch say?, probly worth devising some supports to hold the slates in place whilst it goes off, to avoid 'creep' down the wall....
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimK wrote:

That's encouraging, thanks.

Yes, I'd thought of that. It might be that the best approach would actually be to start with the top course (battening underneath it) and working gradually down to ground level.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
/Yes, I'd thought of that. It might be that the best approach would actually be to start with the top course (battening underneath it) and working gradually down to ground level/q
Could do but may be worth trying to 'tile' it? Doing 2nd row up resting on a temp batten, and sorting some suitable temp spacers for between slates, you'd still have to somehow hold them against the wall in position whilst the glue goes off....
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimK wrote:

Yes, that sounds sensible, thanks.

Depending on how instant the grab of the adhesive is, I suppose. But propping a single length of timber against each slate should be perfectly workable if it proves necessary. The slates are arriving on Monday: I'll try a few tests.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.