Blocks for building a single block wall

Hi,
just looked at blocks for building the single block wall for the shed/workshop and saw a very large list of options.
So what would the team recommend for building a single block wall to about 2M high for a workshop 8m * 3.5m external dimensions?
Do I use the old style 'breeze blocks' or can I use something with better thermal insulation?
Is 100mm thick O.K. or should I go slightly thicker for more stability and better insulation?
I haven't decided yet if I will render the outside, or just paint the blocks.
Any advice welcome.
TIA
Dave R
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Can you still get old style breeze blocks? You certainly need something that will withstand the weather - preferably concrete-based. The lightweight thermal blocks intended for internal use would be completely useless.
Have you considered hollow contrete blocks - the sort that look like a squared off figure 8 in plan view? These are wider than standard blocks, and will give greater stability. You could presumably fill them with some sort of insulating material - but you would, of course, still have a direct concrete bridge from inside to outside - so you'd probably want to dry-line it as well.
Is this a free-standing building? Being under 30M^2 internal area, it is presumably outside the scope of building regs (provided you satisfy the other conditions) so you can do more or less what you like - as long as the planners are happy! How are you going to do the electrics? that's another mine-field to grapple with!
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Roger
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Real breeze blocks were 1930's, and they're often slightly flammable because some of the rubble in them is coal/coke. What most people call breeze blocks are really clinker blocks (and not at all flammable).
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Andrew Gabriel
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

So . . Can you still get clinker blocks? Are they suitable for external use?
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Roger
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writes:

I guess I was referring to things that look like the old style clinker blocks. There seem to be smooth blocks which have wavy lines on each side presumably for render, rough looking blocks, hollow blocks etc. Cheapest is one good option - the prices seem to range from 1 to 4 per block - I was really wondering which blocks were the best general purpose blocks. At under 30 sq m and built from blocks I should be outside both BR and planning if I get my design right. I was wondering about the benefits (if any) of thicker blocks or hollow blocks. With hollow blocks it must be interesting to get mortar on them without filling up the holes in the middle (which I presume are for insulation).
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On Fri, 4 Dec 2009 17:09:57 -0000, David WE Roberts wrote:

I've seen some interlocking "terracotta" looking blocks in France that supposedly have very high insulation qualities and use the thin joint system (an applicator that rolls a layer a few millimetres thick and you just plonk the blocks on). They're intended to be rendered. I seem to remember that they're pricey though
Ah, found them:
http://www.clayblocks.co.uk /
and
http://www.tackburn.co.uk /
SteveW
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David WE Roberts wrote:

The cheapest - seriously, which will be hollow clinker (concrete) which have very little U value - those that do are more expensive, (thermalite) and these are the ones with the wavy lines - they're not suitable for outside.

practically none insulation-wise, but it may get you slightly more stability, although I presume you'll be doing pillars halfway along each long wall?

no, they're there for the same reason as holes in bricks are there - to save materials, but unlike bricks, the holes don't go all the way through, the tops of the blocks are solid, and they are laid hole-side down
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David WE Roberts wrote:

Concrete blocks for choice.
Handle insulation seperately.
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