childproofing TV on a stand

In the light of the recent accident where a child was killed by a glued on fire surround, I've been considering my own house. I have a modern flat screen TV on a little stand on top of a table-type uni t. This could probably be pulled over now that my baby daughter is getting stronger and starting to walk (and *climb*). How could this best be secured - some type of cable from the back of the TV to the wall ? Simon.
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sm_jamieson wrote:

It's encouraging that some good might come out of this tragedy.
A modern TV isn't anywhere near as potentially damaging as a fireplace but you're right to be concerned.
Have you considered bolting the TV to the surface it's standing on?
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Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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On Wednesday, August 27, 2014 1:56:52 PM UTC+1, Mike Barnes wrote:

True, most modern TVs are quite lightweight (now that plasmas seem to be disappearing). I could drive some screws through the rear of the stand into the unit, but it would make rather a mess of both items ! Simon.
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On 27/08/2014 13:46, sm_jamieson wrote:

My TV came with instructions to fix a cable to one of the vesa mounting holes and to the wall. If there is no convenient wall then you need to fix the stand down or attach it to the ceiling.
As I had the stand fail on my last samsung TV (the central column split at the base end, now held together by 3" wood screws) I think fastening it to something rather than fixing the stand down would be better.
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On Wednesday, August 27, 2014 2:47:21 PM UTC+1, Dennis@home wrote:

Several TV safety straps seem to be available, e.g. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Simon.
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On 27/08/2014 15:04, sm_jamieson wrote:

Our current TV came with a similar strap to that and instructions that it should be used. Bit difficult to use on a glass table though ;)
TV is on the wall anyway, keeps it out of the way of the cats ;)
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On Wednesday, August 27, 2014 4:01:24 PM UTC+1, Lee wrote:

Sellotape or PVA ? Simon.
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On 27/08/14 16:03, sm_jamieson wrote:

Messy, coating a cat with PVA and expecting it to stay still....
Probably use a glass clamp?
https://www.google.co.uk/#q=glass+clamp
--
Adrian C

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On 27/08/2014 17:17, Adrian C wrote:

That's not a bad idea, I'll mention that to the FiL who has a 46" lcd which doesn't really feel that stable on its stand. Which in turn is on a glass table meant for something smaller and I'm convinced the tv is going to end up smashed on the floor at some point... Not my problem I know, but they are *nice* in-laws ;)
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On 28/08/2014 10:15, Lee wrote:

I have a safety brace for my LCD TV. I got it from the TV dealer but a similar device is: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
It has a horizontal bar that is screwed across the back of the tv and an adjustable length diagonal tube that is fastened to the back of the TV unit. It prevents the tv tipping backwards or forwards whilst still allowing the tv to be swivelled on its stand.
The tv has been bumped into several times and the brace has held it in place.
Recommended.
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Graham Nye
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I like that
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Adam


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On 27/08/2014 13:46, sm_jamieson wrote:

Chain child to a wall, so she can't reach the TV.
--
Colin Bignell

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/Nightjar On 27/08/2014 13:46, sm_jamieson wrote: - show quoted text - Chain child to a wall, so she can't reach the TV. /q
Ah the resident Victorian :-)
Jim K
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My daughter's TV display shuts down if the grandchild approaches too close. Unfortunately mine doesn't and she has discovered that, but my VESA bracket is bolted to a limestone wall with VERY BIG BOLTS.
But in general, backup strap/chain to the wall (c.f. cooker chains) sounds like a good solution. If on a stand on a heavy enough cabinet, screwing stand to cabinet would probably be my solution and damage to the cabinet would be the least of my concerns.
Also for flat screen TV whether on a stand or the wall, the "child crushing" problem is potentially much less a risk than for a stone fireplace, particularly in this case where there was apparently a heavy "shelf" on top of the surround. Physics dictates that the whole unit pivots out into the room if the surround support fails, making a very large crush footprint.
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On 27/08/14 13:46, sm_jamieson wrote:

I would see if there is a Kensington bolt point on the back and use a calble back to a hook on the wall - it does not need to be tight - just enough to "catch" the TV if someone pulls it forwards.
Next option is a bolt plus eyelet into one of the 4 VESA boltholds on the back (you will have these - but some stands cover these up of use them for the stand mount).
Next option is to epoxy an anti thief bolt pad on the back - these will usually come with the best glue for the job. Then use this and a chain or cable back to a hook on the wall.
You don't need a lot of strength to protect it from falling.
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Well, not sure about this. Old tvs were much heavier and could easily be pushed over on the silly stands they often came with. How did we all live long enough to be adults?
So is it the lightness and naff fixings that you are worried about?. The snag is, unless your tv is different to many, there is really no part of the set strong enough to be that useful. I soppose making sure wires cannot be used to climb, and tables are stable is all one can do. the bit with the feet on on most tvs seems very flimsey, so even screwing it down would not really work. How are the tvs mounted to wall brackets? Maybe some tvs can have a kind of clamp on bracket fitted that fits into holes or slots in the back meant for the job. Brian
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On 27/08/2014 16:18, Brian Gaff wrote:

I do remember at least one incident locally where a rather heavy 22" colour crt was pulled down onto a child causing injury. I'm surprised it didn't happen more often with the spindly metal leg stands they used to be on.
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"Brian Gaff" wrote in message

They don't make kids like they used to...
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On 27/08/2014 17:26, Richard wrote:

And the parents are a bit flaky by and large. Too busy on their phones to look after their children
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The UK stopped gathering home accident statistics in 2002:
http://www.rospa.com/homesafety/adviceandinformation/product/flat-screen-tv.aspx
but in the US the number of children injured by falling televisions more than doubled between 1990 and 2010, with 12,300 receiving emergency treatment in 2011:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-23402419
Modern TVs are easier to pull over because of their lightness but presumably usually cause correspondingly less serious injuries.
-- Richard
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