buying a 2nd hand car

after the discussion when my old corsa was totalled, Im looking at a replacement. As far as haggling is concerned whats the usual markup these guys start at.?
Ive also seen the old car - it looks like the impact was in the rear part of the passengers door. The whole passengers doors side has been pushed in about a foot. The gap that existed between the drivers and passengers seat doesnt exist any more and the floor in the rear passenger space is buckled. Still no useful pointers to guessing impact speed from the other guy ? As soon as adolescent teenager gets up & sorts his camera out I can upload some pictures smewhere.
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of
buckled.
upload
That sort of damage can be done with a speed less than 30mph, the side of a car is not that strong (compared to the front and rear), the damage that you describe sounds like it's reparable if the cars market value made repair economic - what I would really like to know is what the door gaps [1] are like on the other side, this will tell far more about the structure of the car, rather than what the bent bits look like [2].
[1] the gap between front wing and the gap between the door / rear quarter panel.
[2] panel work is designed to bend in an accident, the damage often looks worse than it really is.
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And, as I understand it, if it was entirely the other persons fault you are entitled to have your car repaired even if the cost of the repair exceeds it's value. Which can be a useful bargaining position when negotiating the write off value.
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No. This would be patently ridiculous.

You certainly shouldn't accept the first offer, as this will be based on the lowest trade price. And if an older car, the condition makes a big difference, so one much better than average will be worth more. Some evidence - like adverts from Auto Trader etc - might help and show you mean business on rejecting their first offer.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sat, 08 Jan 2005 12:56:39 GMT, "Peter Andrews"
at a

Nope. The MAXIMUM amount you are entitled to is the "Current market value" (Which the insurance company decide) plus expenses.
If the repair costs are anywhere near the market value the insurance company will make you an offer for writing off the vehicle.
sPoNiX
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As I said, the insurance company may *try* and decide the value, but you're under no obligation to accept it. Most will increase their offer if you argue - preferably with evidence to back up your claim.
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On Sat, 08 Jan 2005 17:39:33 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

I agree. I received an offer from a company and rejected it and sent cuttings from local paper showing that similar cars in my area were valued higher. They made an increased offer which I accepted. Moral is, if you don't ask you don't get.
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<snip>
are
the
No you are not, you may take salvage (and who is at fault doesn't matter) but the settlement will be market value minus salvage value.
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On Sat, 08 Jan 2005 08:57:32 GMT, p cooper

I wonder. I'm amazed at how used car prices have inflated over the past 15 years. I remember that in 1995, you could easily find 10-year old cars with less than 90,000 miles for about 300. Nowadays you are hard-preesed to find them for less than 1500. What is going on? After all, new cars haven't gone up 500% over the past 15 years, have they?
J
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Dunno where you've been looking - high street garage perhaps? The auctions are awash with bargain price 'recent' cars.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sat, 08 Jan 2005 14:52:06 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

I dare say, but would you buy a car from an auction? I only ever did it once. Never again will I buy a car without being able to drive and test before I buy.
J
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Yes - I've bought several. It can be risky, of course, but some auctions are much better than others. Some of the rougher ones seem to specialise in selling worn out mini-cabs to unsuspecting punters. The trick is to know what you're looking for.

Well, you pay dearly for this. Most secondhand dealers source their cars from auctions and put them straight on the forecourt with nothing more than a clean. And a large markup.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sat, 08 Jan 2005 23:36:26 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

I'm sure it depends a lot on the auction, as you said. Last time I went to our local one it struck me as a bit of a joke people (including me, I confess) were paying about the same prices as they would have from private newspaper ads, but without the opportunity to try first. Yes, there certainly is risk involved. I never was much of a gambler.

Interesting point, assuming that;s correct. But of course, they are in a better position to get things fixed cheaply if an auction asquisition turns out to have a najor problem, I suspect. Or perhaps they just shove it back in the same auction and let the next sucker deal with it.
J
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wrote:

Most auctions, you can return the car within hours and get your money back. A pro will know if a car is fine by looking under the bonnet, a walk around and driving it.
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<snip>
back.
around
I beg to differ, as one who has had to put right cars that traders has done the above on...
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AFAIKR, this was not the case with my local auction house - at least, last time I red their terms which addmittedly was 13 years ago.
Consequently, every time I think of car auctions the big question pops up in my pre-frontal lobe: "Why would someone want to sell their car at auction?" and the cynical answer then pops up: "Because it's probably a lemon and they don't want the buyer to be able to find out what's wrong with it before they buy it." Call me a cynical old so-'n-so.
I must pop over to that auction house and read the latest incarnation of their Terms and Conditions. If they have modified them in favour of the buyer, I will definitely look for a car there in the coming days.
Regardless of what the auctioneer's terms say, I wonder if there is any consumer law that has the final say about whether you can take the car back within 24 hours - cap in hand, lol - and demand your money back, 'cause you ain't happy or whatever.
J
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Jimmy wrote:

No. A lot of cars go to auction that have come into the trade as p/exes, and are below the standard of the dealership.
If you atke a 12 year old Volvo and trade it fopr a newer one, in a dealership,. they will take our old one and throw it straight into auction, beacuse they don't want the responisbility of selling it.
If its relaible but atty, it will go on a long time, and some fly operator may take it cheap, spry it up and flog it for a copuple of grand profit. Or you might pick it up at a sensible price if no one fancies it that day.

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The Natural Philosopher snipped-for-privacy@b.c typed:
"Why would someone want to sell

Yes but do the maths on this, I live in a rural part of the country the nearest auctions for cars is 60 mile away so its going to take two chaps x hours and plus x amount of fuel to take a 500 car for auction, or 50 for a breaker to squash it when they could be selling a 25k new car. the local market is awash with older Mondao/Cavalier size cars nobody wants them, everyone wants new or nearly new clean Low mileage FSH cars within this sector. 4x4s and small cars still sell ok down here even Metros! Strange world. IMHO The Volvo 7 series is the most reliable practical versatile cheep to buy throwaway skip on wheels car ever made. :-)
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snipped-for-privacy@upyourpipex.com says...

ISTM most of the cars sold at auction are trade-ins that the dealer hasn't got room or time for, or private cars with short MOTs. Occasionally you get a good private car but with an unrealistic reserve, and some cars are tarted up nails that some Delboy is trying to make a few quid on.
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Only if it's sold with a warranty, or is not as described. And neither is likely on a cheap car.

You can't drive a car at an auction. A pro will want to know the provenance of a car more than almost anything else that can't be seen by looking.
--
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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