Best Dry Lining + Insulation method

The most common method of drylining involves erecting a stud structure
and then filling the space between the studs (600mm wide) with
insulation boards.
Personally, I don't like the idea of having a non uniform insulation
and also having to cut the Celotex boards (sized 2.4m x 1.2m x 50mm).
I was thinking of glueing the Celotex boards to the wall first (=
continous insulation)...and then erecting the wooden structure over
it.
Apparently with the above method, there is the problem of the studs
"denting" the Celotex boards...so, I thought of using some spare
floorboards instead of normal studs.
The wider width of the floorboards (about 170mm) increases the area of
contact against the insulation...therefore they should minimize any
"denting". I've also thought of using some sort of buffering material
(e.g. folded plastic bags) between the "studs" and the insulation.
There is plenty of Floorboards available...I like the idea of
reuse...the boards seem to be stronger than normal studs and I like
the idea of having larger areas to fix cabinets, boiler etc.
The void between the plasterboards and the insulation is only 20mm but
that's exactly what I was looking for = no waste of valuable space and
enough void for most purposes
Can you think of any negative points against this "wacky" idea?
Reply to
swimmydeepo
Dear Swimmy Not sure I understand what you are trying to achieve here and to help I would need to know What is the purpose of the dry lining? Is it to insulate ONLY to isolate from a wet masonry wall is part of the structure in a planned way being the inner stud of a load-bearing wall etc etc If it is pure insulation you are after there are two ways the official way which is battens on dpc on old wall and continuous insuation such as TP10 and plaster board My way which is forget the battens and put TP10 on the inside wall with OUTSIDE fixings (plastic washers and stainless steel pins AND with plasterboard adhesive followed by plasterboard with same fixing method
If you want a stud wall for any other reason let me know and I can advise Chris
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To Chris:
The aim is build a structure to accomodate the plasterboards...the plasterboards to protect the insulations of course. You are talking about using battens...and I'm talking about using "floorboards" instead! I might have talked about using wider battens...so it is a terminology issue I guess. So the official way is to fix the battens to the wall and then fixing continuous insulation (not withing the battens) and plasterboard over it..but if I want to fix something I have to bore the insulation...am I right? Also, installing a socket would involve cutting a bit of insulation...unless a void space between insulation and plasterboard is created = waste of space. I don't know what this TP10 is. Anyhow...I've got my Celotex boards...I have to use them.
Reply to
swimmydeepo
Silly me, just found out...TP10 is basically another brand for something like Celotex.
Anyhow...your idea of OUTSIDE fixings might work in detached houses not in a terrace house like the one in question.
I thought the normal way was to fix the battens to the wall...snug the insulation between them, and then fixing the plasterboards to the battens. You say the insulation goes over the battens not between?
Reply to
swimmydeepo
Now it's getting silly...of course the Outside fixings in that case aren't meant to be used outside. Anyhow why bother to fix them that way...I'd rather use some special glue or ermmm, what about some dabs of expanding foam? Seems the perfect idea to me.
Reply to
swimmydeepo
Dear swimmy Expanding foam aint a good method for fixing something that you want to keep plumb as the foam keeps on expanding during the initial reaction period.
You can fit battens, insulate between them and then put a 10mm insulation on the top before the plasterboard... that stops cold bridging.
My question is more fundamental... why are you bothering to insulate what in effect is an internal wall??? ok it links between you and your neighbour, but unless your neighbours dont have heating installed then the insulation is not really needed... sorry to say that as I know you have already bought it.
If you have/had a damp problem then I would either just put tanalised battens on the wall for strapping and then plasterboard using foil back plasterboard (duplex) or put 2 coats of render on with a waterproof additive and then plaster on top.
Calum Sabey NewArk Traditional Kitchens 01556 690544
Reply to
calums
I did an outside wall, celotex, cement board (or use ply) sandwich and fixed though the whole thing with long frame fixings. No need to battens. The plastic of the frame fixing is waterproof, so no problem there. I used cement board (Viroc I think) as it was to be tiled in a bathroom, so better than ply. I fixed a bathroom cabinet just into the Viroc, solid as a, er, rock. Whether not venting a solid brick wall behind the insulation is a problem is a debatable point. You shouldn't do it if the outside of a solid wall is rendered, since then the wall cannot breathe anywhere.
I think your idea of using floorboards could work, but they are not really acting as studs, since they are not supporting anything under their own strength. They are just acting like a partial-coverage insulation / board sandwich. Simon.
Reply to
sm_jamieson
Swimmy
The fixings are outside-TYPE fixings used inside. It saves space and if the glue fails your wall stays in place I have done this and it works Yes you have to cut into the insulation about 1" or so to put in the sockets but that still leaves an inch left (allowing for the plasterboard) You lose 2.5 " of room but gain lots of warmth! Any method other than a good mechanical fixing supplemented with a suitable ahdesive is full of risk As stated by others battens are ONLY there to produce a gap in case external water penetration occurs. I have taken the risk Chris
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Yep, I took the "risk" too. I was replacing, and in some areas overlaying, plaster painted with several layers of gloss paint that had been there for years, and I'm sure that was just as impermeable as what I replaced it with ! Simon.
Reply to
sm_jamieson
Swimmy The aim is build a structure to accomodate the plasterboards...
YOU DO NOT NEED A STRUCTURE - CELOTEX WILL TAKE IT
the plasterboards to protect the insulations of course. UNDERSTOOD You are talking about using battens
ONLY IN THEORY AS THE CORRECT WAY OF DOING IT - SEE THE CELOTEX AND KINGSPAN SITES AND MODUS OPERANDI FOR DETAILS i HAVE IGNORED THAT "ADVICE"! ...and I'm talking about using "floorboards" instead!
NO YOU ARE NOT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT USING FLOORBOARDS AS A PROTECTOR OF POTENTIAL DAMAGE OF STUD TO THE ISULATION WHEN NO STUD IS NEEDED!
I might have talked about using wider battens...so it is a terminology issue I guess.
BATTENS ARE PUT TO THE WALL BEFORE THE INSUALTION NOT AFTER
So the official way is to fix the battens to the wall
CORRECT - WITH A DPM SEE THE SITE INSTRUCTIONS and then fixing continuous insulation (not withing the battens)
CORRECT
and plasterboard over CORRECT BUT DON'T FORGET THE VAPOUR CHECK it..but if I want to fix something I have to bore the insulation...am I right?
PERHAPS DRILL WOULD BE A BETTER WORD!
Also, installing a socket would involve cutting a bit of insulation...
ABOUT 25 MM
unless a void space between insulation and plasterboard is created = waste of space.
NOT A GOOD IDEA! NO DECENT GLUE OR MECHANICAL FIXING POSSIBLE
I WILL WHEN i GET A MOMENT SHOW SOME PHOTOS OF THE PROCESS bfn C I don't know what this TP10 is. Anyhow...I've got my Celotex boards...I have to use them.
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