Becomming A Sparkie

Knowledgable People.
I have been looking at cources about becomming a Domestice Electrician. There are 2 aims, 1 wire my own new build, 2 charge for work on other peoples houses.
There are 5 day Part P cources, which have exames and stuff, and issue EAL Certificates.
There then appears to be the need to join the NEICC (or similar). At this point my work (on my own house) is inspected, and I can then issue Part P certificates. This is probably the cheepest way to wire my house, if I count my time as "free".
I then set up a company, and have a new carrear, probably doing further training - I have my own company allready, which can simply do different work.
Is this all there is too it, or is there a pile of stuff I am not being told ?
I am allready a CEng, and before Part P would happly wire a whole house, probably making a few minor mistakes.
Thanks Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rick wrote:

To wire your own new build you don't need to be able to self-certify under Part P, as the new build will be covered by a Building Regs application anyway. .
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes you do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stephen Dawson wrote:

Oh no you don't. Is the panto season over ? Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 17:05:24 GMT, "Stephen Dawson"

You don't need to be able to self certifiy, you can ask somebody else (who is qulafied) to certify it for you.
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, Rick - but would you find any sparkie willing to risk his ticket on someone else's unknown work ?
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nick wrote:

It is not his problem - it is building control that will need to find the bod to certify the work. Yet another reason why part P is such a nonsense.
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I should have read it properly, it does no have to beself certified, but has to been approved then by the building control inspection process.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You must have got your CEng via a spell checker, I thought the post was from a 14 year old!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, go for it! easy, piece of pi55! Took me a 5 year apprenticeship, 2 more to be approved, and feck knows how long for Elec Tech.. and NICEIC Oh, and the cable jointing, HV authorisation, Data, Comms, Fire Alarms. Design and test, fault finding. Even did a coded welding course. 50 in march and still learning! so if you start now you should be finished before Burns night! <G>
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 Jan 2006 17:51:24 +0000 (UTC), "Grumpy owd man"

This is the exact reason why I asked, I always thought proper qualified sparkies had years of apprentiship, not just a one week cource, and sombody check out their first job.
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you planning on going full time? Because even as an occasional part time sparkie with full qualifications (maybe you're primarily a kitchen or bathroom fitter) it's still far too expensive to part with the money for NICEIC etc. that you must splash out to be qualified under Part P.
This is not merely a daft regulation for amateurs, it's a daft regulation for tradesmen too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can see that might be difficult to do in the old colours and claim it was all done before 1 Jan 2005

Are you sure that is not a course aimed at already qualified electrician, who simply need to add the ability to self-certify? I certainly wouldn't let you near my factories if you had only done five days' training, but then they are not subject to Part P, so I can happily do them myself.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you Google on this topic from this group you'll get chapter and verse on the costs involved. IIRC, it's not that attractive.
--
*We are born naked, wet, and hungry. Then things get worse.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just wonder about "a few minor mistakes" the ability to kill injure and burn the house down relies on you making minor mistakes its either right or down right dangerous
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mr Fixit wrote:

Don't quite see the logic there. It depends on the mistake in question and also if you spot it and rectify it. The majority of the installed wiring infrastructure in peoples homes across the country are not going to be to current standards and hence would be considered a "mistake" should someone implement the same work today, however you don't see folks frying themselves every five mins as a result.
Generally the folks who never make mistakes are the ones who sit in their armchairs and never do anything.
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

============================================================/
how can you wire a 13amp socket incorrectly and it still be 100% safe or a shower or a cooker & how many house fires start on there own ???? have a look at http://www.nurs.co.uk/news/articles/cms/110495514221269473296_1.htm Quote On average 10 people die and about 750 are seriously injured each year in accidents involving unsafe electrical installations in the home, according to the Government. In addition, 2,336 house fires last year were caused by faulty electrical work
just because you have not fried yourself plenty have and I have seen proper electricians that have fried?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Got a reference for any of these figures? (because they're wrong, or at least mislabelled).
Amateur electrical installation work is _NOT_ killing large numbers of people. If it is, show me the figures. Of installation work in general, amateur work does not have a significantly higher risk than commercial work (OTOH, the accident rate in carrying the work out is far higher). The TV celeb's daughter case that gets trotted out to justify part P was carried out commercially, not as DIY
We do have an issue with electrical safety, particularly those incidents that lead to house fires - the third major single cause of house fires (after smoking and cooking) from the last figures I saw.
However take a look at these electrical accidents in more detail. They have two major causes, firstly portable appliances, secondly old installations. The first are specifically _not_ installations (and so are not improved by part P). Now PAT testing is an improvement here and I certainly welcome its increasing use in commercial premises. That's something that would be a useful and positive step for a government to take. In installations causing accidents the causes are predominantly old failed insulation and unrepaired damage - NOT faulty new installations.
Part P is not only not a safety measure (it's a tax measure) it's also an _unsafe_ measure. By making it more difficult and more expensive to repair old or damaged installations it is making it _more_ likely that they will cause an accident. Nor does it reduce accidents from fauty new installations, because the evidence is that the installations just weren't causing that many accidents in the first place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the DTI ?? http://www.dti.gov.uk/homesafetynetwork/pdf/tvdetail.pdf

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Those are specific figures for accidents involving TVs. How are they at all relevant here?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.