battery tools are crap

It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains! But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I don't do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a revelation they are!
Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than a replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw would have been £120. A new mains powered saw was £110.
Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when you don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains for the charger out to where your working ? Give over!
Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You pay more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the bigger battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the mains equivalents are usually 1kW+.
And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a flat battery.
Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know. Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new toy is.
Bill
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Well, sursprising as it may seem I'm in agreement to some extent. However *some* cordless tools are good and useful. The ones I use almost daily are my 10.8 volt Li cordless drill and driver. Handy, light, much faster than a manual screwdriver and work all around our 9 acres, on the boat, etc. etc.
--
Chris Green
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On 13/09/2017 14:52, Chris Green wrote:

Oh yeas, sorry, I forgot about screwdrivers. I agree totally. I was really focussed on big-ass tools.
Bill
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On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 5:43:10 PM UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

The big-ass Bosch sds drills are awesome!
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On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 14:31:19 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

Horses for courses.
I use a battery drill for winding the legs on my caravan, for example.
I also found a battery drill far easier than a mains drill for fixing the very large tin roof on the very large shed. No trailing cables to drag around.
A battery impact driver is also a tool of choice because you aren't tied down to a cable.
Anything requiring serious grunt, such as sawing, SDS drilling and the like is much better using mains. Angle grinders!
Anyway, the local builders use a mix of mains and battery tools depending on use case.
I think you are trying too hard in your last paragraph; a lot of DIYers here use battery tools and quite a few have power tools as well, and have used mains power tools for yeah these many years.
Cheers
Dave R
--
AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

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<snip> >Anything requiring serious grunt, such as sawing, SDS drilling and the

Daughter bought a Lidl 18V Li-Ion drill, jigsaw and circular saw and I'd have to say they are all pretty good.
The one that surprised me was the circular saw and I've borrowed it quite a few times now and for cutting some fairly serious wood (like decking).
We were using the jigsaw yesterday and it's as 'capable as any mains powered saw I've used.
Because she got the 3 devices at the same time and so also got 3 chargers and batteries, it's rare that you would run out of battery on the grounds you wouldn't typically (in many d-i-y roles) be using all 3 tools at the same time.
I used the circular saw to slice up an old shed into manageable lumps (retaining most of the long lengths of good batten) and whilst it was only (mostly) going though matchwood, I think we did it all on just one battery.
We were working in a back ally so mains wasn't an easy option.
But then I've got a couple and seen a good few more new looking battery tools that weren't worth a light.
Horses for courses etc. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
p.s. I have an old cheap / market 12V Nicad powered drill that was 'big'. It only had a smallish motor that span fast though a reasonable gearbox but it felt pretty unstoppable in use (and abuse). When the batteries died I stripped one and ran a 3m HD 12V cable out the back and with a pair of crocodile clips and so can run it from any 12V source / battery.
So, whilst not *as* portable as it once was, it can still be used away from mains and for a pretty long time. ;-)
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On 13/09/2017 15:08, David wrote:

You sometimes have to be controversial to get the readers' interest and make them respond. It was a bit tongue in cheek. I model myself on Rod Liddle!
Bill
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On 13/09/2017 15:08, David wrote:

+1. When cordless drills first came out they were only any good for wood, plastic, or thin alloy. Oh how times have changed. Obviously they are not going to compete with mains 750 watt tools for continuous work. But the safety and convenience of professional cordless kit for a lot of site work more than compensates for the greater cost.
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I have a tool battery charger that runs off 12v - from the car.

I started with amisn ones - there was no other choice, but the convenience of batterry tools is supreme.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

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On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 14:31:19 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

Just reminded me that our electrician used battery tools.
Apart from the ease of screwing in sockets etc. with a small driver, there is the little issue of what you do when the power is off :-)
Cheers
Dave R
--
AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

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On 13/09/2017 15:19, David wrote:

now does not run for l;long and it needs recharging.
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On 13/09/2017 15:48, Broadback wrote:

I'm still using a mains drill I bought 40 years ago. In the meantime, I've had to throw away loads of battery powered ones (mostly NiCd it has to be said), where the tool still works but the battery is knackered.
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GB wrote:

Still got the Black and Decker mains drill I got with petrol coupons 38 years ago. It works fine. The Bosh cordless one that cost ?160 nine years is almost useless now and has not been used much.
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On Wednesday, 13 September 2017 16:40:18 UTC+1, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:


w and

Is it the drill or the batteries that are useless, they are two differnt th ings ?
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On 13/09/2017 16:52, whisky-dave wrote:

Indeed. The first really good cordless drill I bought in 2003 (18V Makita Combi with three NiMh 2.6Ah batts) worked flawlessly until about 2011, where the batts started to die.
I bought it a set of three replacement batteries in 2012, and those have recently got to their end of life. Not quite as good a life span as the original set, although the usage pattern is different, and I also now use the same set on an impact driver - so they get more use than the first set.
This time I pondered for while whether to replace them again, or whether to switch to Li-Ion. In the end I decided that a twin pack of combi drill and ID plus a pair of 5Ah Li-ion batts and charger could be had for not much more than the price of the old style batts alone, it made sense to switch to the new ones.
I also decided to standardise on that format for 18V stuff going forward, and so sold the 14.4V DeWalt kit I had (angle drill and circular saw), and bought body only Makita replacements.
--
Cheers,

John.
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whisky-dave wrote:

Batteries, both of them.
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On 13/09/2017 16:39, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

I regularly use my battery powered drill whereas my mains powered drill gets little use. Today I drilled two holes in soft brick with the battery drill in less time than it will have taken me to get the mains extension cord out.
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alan_m wrote:

Indeed. I used my cordless drill as a contractor and mainly for using it as a screw driver, it was never too very wonderful even as a screwdriver. The one before that cost about ?70 in 1999. Looking back (and I can) I must have used it on 3000 screws and it never let me down. I gave it away to a pillock who could not work out to use it ......ffs. I rather think that I was unlucky with the Bosh. Got to admit that in 1999 I used this huge very heavy Bosh cordless drill. Cost ?400 apparently. I was informed that if I lost it I would be beaten up. It was Magnificent! It had these lights that came on when it was being used. I felt like Arnold Schwarzenegger when I used it. Me and him look very similar.
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On 13/09/2017 19:25, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

What, old, grizzled, and past it? ;-)
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Cheers,

John.
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John Rumm wrote:

This was in 1999. These days I am still a man of steel.

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