Basic painting advice

Refresh of interior woodwork; Skirting, door frames etc.
Currently basically sound but last painted white over 20 years ago, so now somewhat off-white. In living room with no smokers, so no staining or cooking side effects.
Needs to go back to proper white.
1) Sanding 2) Wash with sugar soap 2) Rinse 4) Undercoat 5) Gloss.
Step 4 - required or not? Step 5 - water or oil based paint ( much to my surprise I discovered in the shed this afternoon that oil based white was still available)
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Chris B (News)

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On 08/11/2018 18:29, Chris B wrote:

I would undercoat. I've found that with water based undercoats that I have purchased in the past few years have more pigment and covers blemishes whereas the gloss top coat gloss is semi-transparent with a lot less pigment material.
I used a solvent based paint from the sheds a few months ago. It took "forever" to touch dry and still very soft 3 or 4 days later. This weekend I used some old solvent based paint purchased 10+ years ago and this touch dried a lot faster despite the ambient temperature being lower.
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On 08/11/2018 18:29, Chris B wrote:

No. The purpose of undercoat is to build up reflectivity, and colour. It you are repainting its not necessary.
All you actually need to do is ensure a good adherence to the existing paint.
I'd question the need for even sugar soap.

The water based stuff is OK but it takes a long time to go really hard
I applied some F&B water based satin over some 16 year old F&B oil eggshell. I sanded a bit first. It seems to have stuck OK.
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On 08/11/2018 18:29, Chris B wrote:

How many different variants would you like?
I'd agree with TNP that you don't need to undercoat, but I do like sugar soap, it does seem to remove decades of grime of all types and gives you a surface that new paint keys to well.
I've more or less gone over to water based gloss in spite of my theoretical objections. But do go for Leyland or another good quality trade paint.
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On 08/11/2018 20:02, newshound wrote:

But you have to sand anyway to get a decent key. The grime comes off with the paint surface.

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On 09/11/2018 05:18, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Well thanks to all for advice, I think I'll try a good quality water based gloss first in an inconspicuous location, on top of a good sanding and a wipe down and decide from there if I need an undercoat.
I was worried that an undercoat may be needed for the gloss to stick to, but all of the comments seems to be about depth of colour given by undercoat rather than increased adhesion.
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On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 10:43:31 +0000
> I was worried that an undercoat may be needed for the gloss to stick

Also has more build, so will cover small scratches or cracks in the prepared surface.
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On 09/11/2018 10:43, Chris B wrote:

some tips
https://youtu.be/yLf05Mo3oIw?t

https://youtu.be/yLf05Mo3oIw?t
3
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On 08/11/18 20:02, newshound wrote:

I agree. If anyone has ever used silicone "polish" that *must* be got off. Silicone is used as a mould release agent for a reason :)
And modern formulations of household cleaners lack the components they once may have had to do this effectively.
The other option is a quick rub over with sandpaper, or a wet and dry paper or block used wet, if dust is a concern. Just enough to cut the surface and give a key.
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On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 11:38:44 +0000

But that can just spread particularly pernicious contamination around a bit, rather than remove it all.
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On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 22:00:36 +0000 (GMT+00:00)

On larger surfaces, perhaps spraying would work better.
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On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 18:29:18 +0000

Depends how good the prepared surface is -

Are you sure that you want brilliant dazzling glossy white? I'm more inclined to use a satin off-white for woodwork these days. Oil-based always seemed to adhere better and dry tougher, but who knows how the environmentalists and elfin safety have messed it up recently?
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On Thursday, 8 November 2018 21:16:02 UTC, Rob Morley wrote:

if you want to save time, scraping before a brief sand is quicker.

alkyd doesn't care, you can skip that unless it's manky

if it's discoloured you probably will need it. Try a bit without & see. Und ercoat has high opacity, topcoat generally not.

alkyd every time, it beats the whatsits off water. (People tend to call it oil paint though it's not.)

They have. My recent use of wilko & Leyland taught me it will no longer cov er the slightest of hairline cracks. OTOH it stuck to glass like nothing el se ever has, so maybe it will last better. But it does need much better pre paration than previous paint, generally a complete strip back & fill of eve ry microscopic crack.
NT
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On 08/11/18 21:15, Rob Morley wrote:

I have cunningly avoided the problem by using nothing but bare wood for skirtings and frames and architrave - and coating with Treatex "oil" (oil and wax blend really).
It cannot chip, the wood looks natural and it can be recoated without fuss if it ever gets worn.
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