attaching wooden fence posts to a nice stone topped wall

have a say 1m fence to construct atop a nice old curved low stone built garden wall, gtopped with some nice old large bits of flattish stone (think wall that had railings ontop before they were cut off for the war). The wall is also sloped so the fence will be hand built to suit - i.e. not panels
Standard ways of attaching fence posts to masonry/concrete are pretty foul bolt down jobbies that look naff and don;t last long IMHO. Also drilling 4 holes is asking for bother on capping stones, and I expect they won't cope with the slope well and will look even more naff...
So looking for a neat way of attaching wooden posts to sloping coping stones...??
Sure I;ve seen some post "shoes" with a length (12"?) of rebar attached vertically underneath presumably to concrete in - can't find em now- was thinkinig I could drill the stones (and better down into the wall) for the rebar and then use resin to anchor them in?
Any thoughts?
Cheers Jim K
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On Sunday, 10 March 2013 17:21:57 UTC+1, Jim K wrote:

mmm OK then
found the things I was on about but they are designed for deck posts with v ertical loads and I'm worried they will not put up with much stress when ho lding a 3ft (say) fence atop a wall in the wind. I think the febce will hav e to be a "hit and miss" job with staggered pales each side to allow some w ind through..
SO plan B:- M12 Threaded stainless rod - post bottoms drilled to take 150mm of this and 200mm protruding, attached with? resin? expanding foam? gorilla glue?
then wall drilled vertically and 200mm section anchored in with resin?
Anyone see anything about this one?
I could maybe beef up the interface between wall and post (against bending by wind or scrotes) by threading a 36mm long M12 bar connector on to the st ud (counter boring the post and wall by 18mm each)
Any thoughts anyone?
cheers Jim K
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I must admit I'd be very wary of adding a fence to the top of a wall. Structurally they are working in very different ways and I wouldn't have thought that it would take much wind load to risk damaging the wall. This might account for the lack of replies to your question.
Some pictures would be a big help. Personally, I'd put posts in behind the wall supporting the fence over the wall.
Tim
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In message < snipped-for-privacy@news.eter

M12 doesn't take much to bend and I doubt the bar connector would add much strength.

Me too. 75mm square and well fixed to the side of the wall.
--
Tim Lamb

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mmm. I envisage there not being much of a gap between the post and the wall copings so the posts wouldn't be "hanging" on an exposed inch of M12 say..
I imagined the connector would be resined into the wall top and base of post and so not solely exposed to any bending forces
Maybe a test is called for.

er to the wall?
Jim K
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On 12/03/2013 13:10, Tim+ wrote:

This happened near me. The 3ft brick wall came down in one piece off its raised plinth and fell onto the pavement. Luckily there was no-one underneath.
Andy
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can I guess the posts were attached to the wall tops with bolt down met post things?
how high was the fence and what construction? panels, hit & miss ??
Cheers Jim K
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I would just forget the whole idea of fixing a fence to the wall. Railing on top of a wall are fine as they put relatively little wind load on but a fence, even a "hit and miss" design is a veritable sail.
Of course without pictures, dimensions or construction details of your wall we're all guessing really.
Tim
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wrote:

As I didn't build it there are construction details as such - However as you ask it's approx 1m tall built of coursed stone, approx 12 inch total wall width, thick stone copings as described in the OP.
I have no pictures - what is it you would need to see?
Jim K
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In message

Unlikely in what you describe, but a dpc is a weak point in a straight wall.
--
Tim Lamb

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Surely a garden wall isn't going to have a DPC?
Tim
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wrote:

& no movement joints either ;>) it's old - late victorian I'd guess.
Jim K
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In message < snipped-for-privacy@news.ete

There was one at a house some friends were buying. Shutting the garden gate caused a length of brick wall to wobble:-)
--
Tim Lamb

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On 12/03/2013 20:45, Jim K wrote:

Fence and wall both about 3ft (the original wall was just low enough to see over, and see the bowling club). I don't recall how it was fixed on, and can't find a reference to any news story. They've put a 6ft wall up now and it has been fine.
Andy
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cheers jim K
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