asbestos cement garage roof



You clearly don't understand the nature of risk and risk management, let alone statistics.

A girl died recently after her first kiss. Should we ban kissing?
MBQ
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It would be helpful for Harry to learn how the no safe minimum concept came about. It is of course a nonsense, just the result of courtroom bs.
NT
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No, but my understanding was that the most likely explanation is that "one fibre can kill" is true - in the sense that in each case of fatal lung cancer there will have been a single fibre which caused the irritation which started the cancer. Of course, the chance that any one fibre will kill is microscopically small; but to be safe you want the chances that NONE of the fibres you are exposed to kill you to be high.
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Asbestos actually comprises two distinct mineral types:
Chrysotile - White asbestos, is actually a form of serpentine - Short fibes, used in asbestos-cement products - Dissolves readily in lung tissue (2-12 months) - Treat as with any other inhaled dust (all dust is harmful, be it household, diesel particulates, MDF or hardwood cutting)
Crocidolite - blue/brown asbestos from amphibole group of minerals with completely different crystal structures and chemical properties. - Very long fibres, used in lagging, bulk insulation & fabric - Does not dissolve in lungs, permanent, causes mesothelioma - Not used for house soffits, garage roof or walls in recent periods
There is no requirement for specialised contractors for Chrysotile, but realise companies can do the old woodworm trick "pulling dust out of their pocket from elsewhere". They may quote low to get in the door, but then miraculously the bill escalates - until insurers question the 20,000 bill and suddenly find the alleged board did not exist in the house.
Chrysotile boards are a simply fantastic insulator re solar gain (and fire proofing), and the garages are usually extremely well ventilated re drying from the roof panel corrugations and any door gap.
The easiest to remove are the J-bolt fitted roof panels - pretty much bolt cropper the J and slide off. Realise however the panels are brittle (do not walk on) and the steel frame is typically very weak with the chrysotile panels themselves providing a surprising amount of bracing. Many local councils will take chrysotile double bagged, but not all. It is quite possible to dismantle a panel at a time and replace with various agricultural boards so you have a migration over years. Worth doing, but beware the panels may be supporting a fair amount of load if the frame is heavily corroded. You are more likely to be injured by the thing collapsing. Do not angle grind basically.
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