antislip cover for a manhole cover

I've got a metal manhole cover on my front path, and it is slippery when wet.
I've looked at the antislip tape from toolstation at £4 - but does it stick on such a surface or is there a better way of making it antislip?
Did wonder whether to paint it with gloss paint and sprinkle sand on the wet paint!
--
Mark BR
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On 18/10/2012 15:44, Mark BR wrote:

Whether a tape will stick will depend a lot on the quality of the surface it is going to be stuck to. I would expect that a conformable tape would work best on something like a manhole cover.

Probably better than nothing, but there are plenty of purpose made non-slip paints available.
Colin Bignell
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I looked at the non-slip paint, but it is about £28 for enough to cover some 200 sq m. I only want a cover 2' by 1' protected!
--
Mark BR
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On 18/10/2012 17:56, Mark BR wrote:

I've seen it quite a lot cheaper than that and International Paints do a pack of non-slip additive for about £5. Otherwise, if you want to make your own, I would suggest using coarse carborundum powder rather than sand.
Colin Bignell
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Mark BR wrote:

Non slip paints are really meant for indoor use, and they aren't very good when used outdoors, I've found. One option is to use ribbed rubber flooring material. I have in the past used this outdoors successfully by first painting the area with thick gloss and liberally spreading sand on it, to give the underside of the rubber something to grip to. What you have to do is cover the paint completely with a layer of sand (don't just sprinkle it) then put a board over it and walk about on the board. The wait til it's dry, then brush off the excess. Then hose it after a day or two so there's absolutely no loose grains. The rubber mat can have ordinary aluminium carpet edging strip around the perimeter. This will grip the rubber firmly. Fasten the strip down with self tappers.
An alternative to the sandy paint is Evode impact adhesive, but an £8 tin will only barely do 2 sq ft.
Whatever way you fasten the rubber, warm it first because otherwise on a hot day it will form ridges. It needs to be under v slight tension.
Bill
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On 18/10/2012 20:01, Bill Wright wrote:

I suspect that International Paints would disagree with you. They make non-slip deck paints for ships working in Arctic conditions.
Colin Bignell
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On 18/10/2012 21:58, Nightjar wrote:

But decks of ships in the Arctic tend not to accumulate algae growing on retained organic and other material - which is what can happen in ordinary gardens.
--
Rod

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On 18/10/2012 22:01, polygonum wrote:

No, they tend to accumulate frozen sea spray.
Colin Bignell
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On Oct 18, 10:01 pm, polygonum wrote:

And tend not to buy their paint in B&Q or the local decorator centre.
Owain
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polygonum wrote:

You've never seen a canal boat deck, then. They use the same International Paints anti-slip products. They're expensive, but good. They need hosing off fairly regularly, but that's all, and I'd expect to do the same to manhole covers in a path.
--
Tciao for Now!

John.

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On 18/10/2012 22:32, John Williamson wrote:

It was exactly that which prompted my post! Saw someone painting afresh with an ordinary paint, someone else with a newly non-slip painted deck area and that looked fine, and a few which were very algae-covered and at least looked slippery. Maybe it was because they were moored under trees? And no-one had done the hosing off in a while.
--
Rod

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--SNIP--
Adhesive, that made me think, always a bad idea.
What would sand and PVA do? Got some in the garage so can always experiment with that.
--
Mark BR
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I was just going to suggest that. Its cheap and easily renewable. Paint on the PVA and sprinkle with sand before it dries.
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On Thursday, 18 October 2012 15:49:16 UTC+1, Mark BR wrote:

Black tar paint (bitumen primer, cheap and very useful), then sprinkle dry sand through a coarse sieve or colander.
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When at school, we did the paving slabs around the outdoor pool with sand and paint, we mixed the sand with some of the paint and applied it, then once it was dry, put a top coat to seal in any bits of sand that had become exposed and thus would probably get washed out over time.
It did the job just fine so i guess for the manhole it'll be ideal, and the cheapest method,
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On Thursday, 18 October 2012 15:49:16 UTC+1, Mark BR wrote:

tick

wet

Hello,
One option is to look at the anti slip slip at www.heskins.com, they are a company specialising in anti slip coatings, they have done work on anti sli p manhole covers.
Regards,
L
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