All Done by Electricity 1968

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/3061
just been shown on Talking Pictures.
Some nice old fuseboards, modern 3 pin plugs, and a gentleman gets electrocuted in the bath while his wife does the ironing.
Owain
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On Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:30:46 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Fascinating. I know some people that could learn from it !!!
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Kind of reminds me of the Iron my granny bought from Arding and Hobbs, it had a bayonet plug like the end of a light bulb and the instructions showed it plugged into the overhead light in a kitchen. Do not remember the make now, but can you imagine the uproar if one tried this today? Brian
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I can remember my grandma having an iron with a bayonet fitting. She had an "extension bayonet" fitting with a male end that plugged into the existing pendant light fitting, and then straight-through female end for the light bulb and another female end at 45 degrees for the iron.
https://www.flameport.com/electric_museum/bayonet_BS52/BEEKA_double_BS52_adaptor.cs4 shows what I mean. until I saw the illustration, I'd forgotten that it included a switch for *one* of the outlets (just the light bulb, with the iron being unswitched). Looks as if it's made of genuine Bakelite, as well ;-)
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Yes even in the 1970s you could by fairy lights all wired in series across the mains, usually 20 bulbs with one fusible bulb which had bayonet connector on one end. Highly lethal, no double insulated wires and the sockets were just in hard plastic mouldings. Brian
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On Tuesday, 30 July 2019 07:42:08 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:

We had them in kindergarten. Every Christmas we added to the effect by making little paper lanterns to fit over the hot filament bulbs.

We also had a squirrel in a cage in the classroom and were told not to put our fingers through the wire.
Owain
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Brian Gaff pretended :

I still see lots of those lethal sets around. I saw some for sale last week on a second hand stall in a market.
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But hardly anyone died.

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wrote

I wonder how many deaths (or injuries such as falling off ladders etc due to muscle convulsions caused by shock) would be needed to lift it out of the "hardly any" category.
I have had a mains shock in this situation where someone had cut and rejoined one of the series wires using a terminal block. I made the elementary, infantile mistake of thinking "there's only 12 V across each of these bulbs, so it's safe", forgetting that as soon as you break the circuit and replace the resistance of one bulb with the much higher resistance of the human body, almost all the voltage drop is across the body and only a small amount (proportional to lamp resistances relative to the body's) is across the lamps. Ouch! Thanks goodness for the RCD tripping...
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Certainly a lot more deaths than say one a year and there werent even that many.
Same with little kids sticking their fingers into normal light bulb sockets with the light turned on or sticking metal into the older unshuttered power points with them turned on or plugging leads that had been cut off appliances into a power point and grabbing the bare wire ends.

I managed it myself, twice now. The first time when building the house, doing the pointing of the block work in the dark after a long day block laying. I used PAR38 flood lights on extension cords just lying on the wooden planks I had on 44 gallon oil drums that I used instead of scaffolding. The PAR38 bulbs didn’t like the vibration from walking on the planks much when running turned on so the bulb life wasn’t brilliant. When one of them went out again, with me left in the dark, I ran my hand along the cord to get to the bulb to replace it and ended up with bare wires in my hand. Turned out that the cord had pulled right out of the bulb holder instead of a failed bulb.
Decades later I used to power the wifi repeater half way down my back neighbours back yard from my place using long extension cord that lay on the ground across my back gate. One of the high school kids that used to hang around the back gate smoking so the school wouldn’t see them there had cut that cord in spite because I used to fuck them off for smoking there.
My back neighbour had reported that the wifi repeater had stopped again so I went out to see why and was talking to him when I saw the cut cord and absent minded touched the cut end of the cord while showing him that and got a shock from that.
Don't have any RCDs here because the house was built in the very early 70s by me. Didn’t get even a visible burn.
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I think I would always get a whole-supply RCD fitted if the house didn't have one. Even better is a separate RCD for each circuit so a failed light fitting doesn't trip all the 3-pin plugs as well.
I don't think any of the shocks that I have had (various 240V mains, and one of about 400 V from a transformer that powered a valve amplifier in a tape recorder) gave me burns, just "dead" arms/fingers for a while afterwards. All except one were without RCD protection.
The most recent one (a few weeks ago) was with RCD, and though it gave me a bit of a jolt, there was no lasting effect. Just as well considering I think it was arm to arm (across the heart) and my heart may be less tolerant after I had a heart attack eight years ago. The circumstances were about as stupid as you can imagine - I'm ashamed to say that I made the elementary mistake of seeing that the light bulbs were off and thinking that that meant the wall switch was off - forgetting that the bulbs are all Philips Hue which are left permanently powered but the LEDs can be turned off. I'd been so good about turning off both wall switch and lighting circuit MCB, apart from that one time when I needed to make yet another change to the wiring between one ceiling spotlight and another, and couldn't be arsed to go downstairs to the circuit breaker and thought I'd rely on the wall switch.
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I don’t bother because I have seen those events be no more than a minor nuisance. There is very little chance of getting across the mains and neutral or mains to earth with a low enough resistance to be a problem even tho I spend the entire spring summer and winter inside the house with bare feet on a bare concrete floor.
That tripping on an appliance fault is likely to be much more of a damned nuisance.
I do have one of those portable RCDs with an extension cord plug and a set of sockets on the box and so have just electric chainsaws but never bother to use it for that. The chainsaws do have plastic bodys where you hold them when using them.
I don’t even use it with the hand held circular saw either and the oldest one that I used to build the house has a metal body entirely, no plastic at all.

My house is 2 phase with the lights and socket circuits spread between the two phases so a single phase failure with the street mains doesn’t see everything go off, so one RCD per phase wouldn’t see that happen.

I've never see that dead arm/finger result. I did get one sort of hole in the hand somewhere, forget what produced that.

Not clear if that risk does increase, spose it might given that yours did stop.

All my lights have always been on mains sockets. Mostly with non switched sockets at the socket itself in the ceiling accessed thru 4'x1' drop in sections in the ceiling which can take a full double fluoro fitting. Most of them only have a stop in multi section piece of what we call fibro, rigid wall sheet that at one time used to have asbestos in them but now doesn’t.
Had any regrets with the Hues ? I havent and mine is almost all Hue now. Not cheap but work brilliantly. I don’t have any physical switches at all, just movement sensors and use a voice command to tell the system to turn all the lights off when in bed. With all of iphones, google home minis and an echo box able to control everything and some stuff done on time of day/ sunrise and sunset.
Love it except for the price. Don’t think that I have ever paid full price for any of it, buy the amazon discounts and get 10% off that as well at Bunnings with their price match if you are quick enough so they havent noticed the latest amazon discount offer yet.
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Hue bulbs are certainly very good. The only problem we had with one bulb was a mechanical one and nothing to do with the technology: one of the little lugs that stick out from the bayonet fitting (UK uses bayonet not Edison screw) on one bulb has come off, so the bulb doesn't lock into the fitting on one side. I've never had it happen with any other bulb, so maybe it's a slightly weak point on Hue bulbs - or maybe the larger size/weight of the bulbs makes them more vulnerable if a table lamp gets knocked over (we suspect it may have happened while some friends were staying).
It's great to be able to turn lights on or off by switch, movement sensor or Alexa voice control, and to be able to dim them or time them to come on in the evening.
Philips *urgently* need to lift that 50-odd bulbs per hub restriction. Our new house has *lots* of GU10 ceiling spotlights, fitted by the previous owners, and in any room on a given light switch, all those need to be changed to Hue. We are very close to the limit, and there are still two rooms that are not yet Hue. As far as I know, the restriction is per hub, but you can't control more than one hub from the same user account on the app and on Alexa, so getting an extra hub isn't the solution.
It's a shame also that Hue bulbs have a minimum brightness and can't be dimmed further (as night lights) without turning them right off.
But they are a great idea. Now Philips need to bring the price down dramatically. Like you, we only buy them when Amazon have them on special offer.
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That’s not correct.

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Which bit is incorrect: the 50+ bulb per hub limit or the one hub per Hue app account? Keeping up with all the restrictions is not easy, and it's possible that some of the restrictions may have been lifted/modified since we last checked.
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The second.
Keeping up with all the restrictions is not easy, and it's

They havent changed. Its always been possible to have more than one hub per Hue app account. Just not as easy to setup.
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Still got some and much later than 70s - and no-one has been killed so perhaps you meant potentially lethal.

--
bert

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Brian Gaff presented the following explanation :

You bought the replacement lamps by describing the base and the total number of lamps in the set. I guess they were all the same wattage, just the intended voltage which varied.
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On 29/07/2019 21:38, NY wrote:

I still have one of those useful adapters in my box of electrical oddd'n'ends. The 45 degree spur also has an on-off switch, for 'safety'.
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Brian Gaff explained :

Not that unusual back in the day, few people had and wall outlets. You could even buy BC double adaptors, so you could plug the iron in and have the bulb lit. Many of the homes with socket outlets, probably only had a single 5amp two pin in the whole house. I remember my dad running an electric fire, radio, Christmas tree and later a TV via a multi way adaptor from a 5amp two pin. If the fuse blew, rewire with an even bigger wire :-)
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