AC - DC adapter

Anyone any thoughts on where I could get a replacement for one of these: https://www.flickr.com/gp/161457453@N02/iv5D72
I've Googled but not found anything.
Christmas lights: 240v - 4v 1VA with a spade and pin plug.
--
F

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/12/2017 18:18, F wrote:

The logo on the label implies it is AC output. 1VA is very low power.
Try it with 4.5v DC (3x AA cells) and a diode in series and see what lights up. Then take a look in Maplin if you don't mind paying throught the nose or eBay if you are not in a hurry. The PSUs that come with a range of connector fittings are you best bet.
4.5DC might be OK if the LED chain isn't relying on AC power to work properly. You might get away subverting an old mobile phone charger...
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/12/2017 19:55, Martin Brown wrote:

I saw the ~ and ignored it. Amateur hour!
--
F

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
F wrote:

Do the light flash or do anything clever? the AC input might be used for timing purposes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/12/2017 21:09, Bob Minchin wrote:

Each lamp (three sticks of 12) cycles through different colours.
--
F

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
F wrote:

OK well try the 3 x 1.5v battery route and it might work or if not, it is not too hard to knock up a squarewave oscillator at 50hz running from a DC supply which should bring back the twinkle to your lights. Also worth opening up the old transformer and see if just the thermal fuse has failed?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If its ac then why the polarised connections though? Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15/12/2017 09:29, Brian Gaff wrote:

It about the cheapest nastiest connector ever made.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 15 December 2017 10:33:16 UTC, Martin Brown wrote:

They used to be used for speaker connections IIRC, and few have such speakers now so they probbaly got a good deal on them from a suplier or scrap merchant :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15/12/2017 10:53, whisky-dave wrote:

Look up 2 pin DIN, if that's what is shown in the picture.
--
Max Demian

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

we've a number of Christmas light which use that connector,
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 15 December 2017 15:39:28 UTC, charles wrote:

Well I wouldn't use them for that, I can't see the point.
I used a 3 pin DIN for my enlarger timer.
I used 5 pin DIN on a blue circle cement project using fuzzy logic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

small and cheap.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 15 December 2017 14:23:11 UTC, Max Demian wrote:

they have been used as speaker connectors for years and most poeple know what they are. They are speaker connectors.
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=speaker+plug&client=firefox-b&dcr=0&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=Ri69Q4N2v-vG8M%253A%252CtyZa9VcKhlI9iM%252C_&usg=__8e7g6dP0f7vrc7OUB9g0rO6thsM%3D&sa=X&ved hUKEwjKzKCqq4zYAhVjBcAKHdwqDJcQ9QEI0QIwAg#imgrc=Ri69Q4N2v-vG8M:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIN_connector#Loudspeaker_connector
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

European audio equipment almost always used circular 5-pin 180 degree DIN connectors for mic and line level inputs, and line level outputs, and used the 2-pin connector for each speaker. My Phillips cassette recorder used it, as did my dad's B&O record deck and his cine projector (for playing sound through external amp or for dubbing onto the soundtrack).
It was even fitted on Japanese equipment such as Sony radio-cassette players.
It was only in the 1980s that I first saw phono plugs for line-level connections between equipment (eg record deck, cassette deck, CD player, graphic equalizer to amplifier). Phono plugs require more plugs (separate for left and right) whereas DIN combines both in one plug. ON the other hand, DIN plugs are more difficult to solder wires onto because the pins are very close together.
I remember that a lot of equipment had three-pin speaker sockets which would allow a two-pin plug to be plugged in either way round (ie spade connector always in the centre hole but pin in either of the holes). I'm not sure what the thinking was there, because as far as I could tell, the two pins were connected together so you didn't get phase-reversal buy reversing the plug.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 15 December 2017 15:52:05 UTC, NY wrote:


r

ow

=0&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=Ri69Q4N2v-vG8M%253A%252CtyZa9VcK hlI9iM%252C_&usg=__8e7g6dP0f7vrc7OUB9g0rO6thsM%3D&sa=X&ved hUKEwjKz KCqq4zYAhVjBcAKHdwqDJcQ9QEI0QIwAg#imgrc=Ri69Q4N2v-vG8M:


d

Yes I know, that;s why most refer to that connector as a speaker connector.





are

Yes although compared to the mini DINs I've used on the early macs they are piss easy to connect in comparision.

uld

r

hat


g.
This was for speakers wasn't it not christmas tree lights. I didn't use them on my speakers I used 4mm plugs.
Apparently human ears can't detect the differnt phase so it shouldn;t make a differnce.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15/12/2017 16:06, whisky-dave wrote:

They can certainly tell the difference if the left and right hand channels are out of phase.
--
Mike Clarke

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 15 December 2017 17:54:23 UTC, Mike Clarke wrote:

What do you mean by out of phase ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Dec 2017 02:59:25 -0800, whisky-dave wrote:

Oh dear, dear, dear.
--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 18 December 2017 12:55:57 UTC, Bob Eager wrote:

t

So yuop don;t knopw do you. Are you saying that getting the speaker wires crossed is out of phase ? You do know that the human ear can;t detect phase don't you , no you probba ly don't
http://www.earlevel.com/main/1996/10/21/a-question-of-phase/
The human ear is insensitive to a constant relative phase change in a stati c waveform. For instance, you cannot here the difference between a steady s awtooth wave (which contains all harmonic frequencies) and a waveform that contains the same harmonic content but with the phase of the harmonics dela yed by various (but constant) amounts. The second waveform would not look l ike a sawtooth on an oscilloscope, but you would not be able to hear the di fference. And this is true no matter how ridiculous you get with the phase shifting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.