Alternatives to downlighters in insulated flat roof .

Hi,
Looking for some alternative lighting solutions for a loft conversion.
- Loft conversion with large dormer with a flat roof. - Flat roof is insulated with celotex [equivalent] between the joists and another 50mm fixed below the joists (so 150mm or so of celotext in total).
For lighting my initial instinct was to go with downlighters (spotlights) to make best use of the limited ceiling height, but having looked into it I'd much prefer to not to have large holes cut into the insulation (because of resulting poorer insulation, compromised moisture barrier, possible contravention of regs, etc.).
What lighting alternatives are available? I'm thinking maybe some kind of low profile light fittings around the edges of the ceilings, I figure if the light is cast across the ceiling then it will reflect off and illuminate the whole room reasonably well. I want to avoid having protruding light fittings (even low profile) in the centre of the ceilings as there is already limited headroom and therefore I think they would just be annoying.
Thoughts? (Links to actual fitting welcome!)
Colin.
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On 06/06/2012 22:39, Colin Green wrote:

make best use of the limited ceiling height, but having looked into it I'd much prefer to not to have large holes cut into the insulation (because of resulting poorer insulation, compromised moisture barrier, possible contravention of regs, etc.).

profile light fittings around the edges of the ceilings, I figure if the light is cast across the ceiling then it will reflect off and illuminate the whole room reasonably well. I want to avoid having protruding light fittings (even low profile) in the centre of the ceilings as there is already limited headroom and therefore I think they would just be annoying.

I have a living room with a low ceiling, and I light that using uplighters on the walls. Standard Wickes ceramic ones, using CFLs.
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Uplighters work well, but avoid the grim plaster things, they're just a mistake. If headroom is low, its best to go with a many low power uplighting, and/or wall lights. Or you can be bold about it and mount a shallow trough inches under the ceiling down the full lenth of the room and put heavily dimmed fl uplighting in it. 3500K is nice.
NT
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On Thursday, June 7, 2012 12:08:08 AM UTC+1, NT wrote:

The quarter sphere things ? I think they look good in hallways and landings, but nowhere else. But they look tasteless when painted the same colour as the emulsion ! Simon.
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I reckon my grim plaster things look OK, emulsioned the same colour as the walls. I've got oak beams, pine wainscotting, and exposed stone above an inglenook to provide visual interest, the uplighters just blend in. YMMV
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The bulbs are too close to the plaster. They show up the tiniest imperfections on the wall, and create an intense light area. Decent uplighting does neither
NT
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Thanks for the feedback.
I've gone for a few downlights where appropriate, e.g. two in a small bathroom (one is a combined spot/extractor vent) and three in a part of the roof where the above insulation is much deeper (and thus I don't mind so much about having holes cut into it). Everywhere else I have opted for lighting sockets adjacent to the normal 3 pin sockets, but they are switched via light switches positioned as you would normally expect them. I can plug various lights into these (e.g. floor and table lamps) and thus allow more flexible use of the already restricted space.
The electrician actually suggested this option and it's not something I was aware of as an option until he mentioned it. I'm not sure what the exact type of socket/plug he will be using is - anyone on here know what the standard is for this? (if any) (just so I'm happy this doesn't contravene any regs).
Thanks,
Colin
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BS546 2A or 5A round pin plugs, the ones that date back at least as far as the 1930s. They are still allowed. 2A ones look nicer imho.
NT
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On Sunday, June 10, 2012 11:35:46 PM UTC+1, NT wrote: [...]

Thanks. Seems like this might be a slightly unorthodox option, but a quick search shows they're still allowed (as you say) and I can buy these online so I'll run with this option. Not sure if the sparky was intending to use 2A or 5A, probably 5A from what I'm finding.
Colin
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On 12/06/2012 20:54, Colin Green wrote:

It's quite orthodox in fact. The standard is BS 546:1950. In domestic premises the socket outlets must be the shuttered type.
--
Andy



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On 06/06/2012 22:39, Colin Green wrote:

make best use of the limited ceiling height, but having looked into it I'd much prefer to not to have large holes cut into the insulation (because of resulting poorer insulation, compromised moisture barrier, possible contravention of regs, etc.).

profile light fittings around the edges of the ceilings, I figure if the light is cast across the ceiling then it will reflect off and illuminate the whole room reasonably well. I want to avoid having protruding light fittings (even low profile) in the centre of the ceilings as there is already limited headroom and therefore I think they would just be annoying.

Uplighters
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