40+ year-old cars no longer need a MOT



Does or did a traction engine ever require an MOT? Oddly, I've never seen one at my local garage being tested. I doubt the rolling road would take the weight...
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*If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Fri, 18 May 2018 13:48:48 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

HGV's are tested, a different class, never seen a traction engine on one but seen plenty of traction engines with bald tyres and only a brake band operating on the outside of a drum on the rear axle. All with a licence plate and at some stage they would have been paying VED.
Then we have Steam wagons, huge heavy things, although some of them have pneumatic tyres.
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On 18/05/2018 14:58, The Other Mike wrote:

Yes, steam wagons - heavy things, that can actually move quite fast and with non-assisted, cable or rod-operated brakes!
SteveW
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On Sunday, 20 May 2018 19:24:45 UTC+1, Steve Walker wrote:

The steam engine itself can be used as a brake. On some it was the main braking method.
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wrote:

and the only practical way to test that is on the road with a tapley brake meter.
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wrote:

It's just a case of leverage... and puckered arse
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Later models from the end of the 1920’s had steam operated brakes that were probably better than those fitted to IC powered vehicles of the same era, it was important at the start of a journey to warm them through or they wouldn’t work too well but once that was done they could lock the wheels. Picture here of the warning sign carried to warn users of vehicles with less effective brakes.
https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1929_Super_Sentinel_DG8_ (27883702195).jpg
I can just about remember lorries carrying similar warnings about having Air Brakes circa late 50’s when there were still many older cars on the road with brakes that were not of a standard we are used to now. Even if they worked well enough most of the time brake fade from overheating going down a long hill was a problem that is hardly considered now for most drivers.
GH
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Why didn’t that work ? Maybe this does. https://goo.gl/images/woHNAh
GH
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Works fine for me.

That’s fine too.
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On 29/05/2018 10:06, Marland wrote:

I remember seeing an "escape lane" full of sand to stop lorries whose brakes had failed.
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Max Demian

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On 29-May-18 11:59 AM, Max Demian wrote:

They still exist. There is one on the A379 descent into Dartmouth. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@50.3542945,-3.5820649,127m/data =!3m1!1e3?hl=en
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Road workers were smoothing the one at Chideock in Dorset when I passed last week. I wonder how often they get used in anger, the Chideock one often has a few ruts in it but they seem to be too short to have been from a runaway. Perhaps it’s people mucking about with trail bikes or something.
GH
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When I've seen ruts in this one https://goo.gl/maps/VY3tDSupRNR2 they've looked surprisingly short, but then I imagine with your wheels submerged up to or even beyond the axles, you will stop in a pretty short distance.
I wonder how often vehicles have to use them. Is it heavy vehicles like HGVs that tend to suffer brake failure more than cars do? Obviously a runaway truck will do a lot more damage than a car to anything it hits.
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On 29/05/2018 13:58, NY wrote:

Or idiots don't realise what they are and use them as a convenient place to stop and so enter slowly.
SteveW
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On Tuesday, 29 May 2018 13:58:41 UTC+1, NY wrote:

1e3?hl=en

.
up

GVs

Modern vehicles seldom need these traps, old ones routinely ran out of brak es on longish or steep descents. While every driver of such things knows or should know to engine brake, monitor the brakes and stop before they run o ut, now & then that process went wrong somehow. It was normally commercials that ended up in the gravel.
NT
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Presumably most of them like Adam's apprentices, the dregs of that labor market.
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Wonder if the steam brakes are failsafe, i.e. you need steam pressure to release
Last time I had brake fade was with some brand new pads in the mid 80's with one of the first asbestos free compounds. If not properly cured the bonding chemicals outgassed if the pads were pushed hard on the road, leading to a gas barrier between the disc and pad and not much braking. After driving and bedding in the pads progressively for maybe 15 mins, doing a bit more than 60 coming up to a T junction and suddenly having a very soft brake pedal do not very much is a bit unpleasant. Luckily the road was wide enough and quiet enough to use the handbrake and a bit of steering lock to scrub off enough speed to avoid the hedge and field but I was still over the white line.
Fresh brake fluid too so no possibility of fluid boiling although it felt exactly like that.
Once the pads had been through one 'extreme' heat cycle then they performed without a problem in normal service.
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On Thursday, 17 May 2018 10:55:52 UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

yes, and owners of such vehicles normally do that.

yes & yes. Things are very different today. Any more daft questions?

you don't need to go back that far. Even something as modern as the Ford Anglia has around twice the stopping distance of today's cars. Go back 80 years and it's much worse.

it's not perfectly safe to take any car on the road.
Owners of classic cars don't do that - unless they are that way as original. With those they drive suitably paranoidly, and the result is a well below average accident rate.

a different topic entirely in fact

yes, and classic car owners already do that, making an MOT a bit pointless. We're not still in the 60s.
NT
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Care to provide some proof of that? Which 'old car' clubs are you active in?

Pray tell what has changed so an annual safety check on a vehicle is no longer needed?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thursday, 17 May 2018 14:34:48 UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

The low cost of insurance is proof.
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