Wall mount TV



We replaced a 26 inch CRT with a new 40 inch Plasma for $2800 around Christmas 2008. Had to throw away the "entertainment unit" it fit in too,and we replaced it with a lowe cabinet with an electric fireplace in it. I could buy a 50 inch LED 4K for less than 1/4 that today - -
Had another 26 inch CRT in the basement - in a semi-built-in cabinet. When it died I had to look high and low for a flatscreen that would fit the opening. Not too many that would fit!!!.
Then a customer decided they needed a 70inch TV with 4 HDMI inputs to replace their 2006 50 or 52 inch Panasonic Plasma - and I scored the plasma for $150 - about half what a cheap LCD TV would cost new.
HEAVY PIG!!!!! and no way it would fit in the old cabinet. It sat on top for a few years until I decided the old cabinet had to go and I bought another electric fireplace cabinet for the basement - the one rated for a 50-some lb 72 inch TV
Had to re-enforce it to hold the 235 lb plasma - - -
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On 1/7/19 1:20 PM, Frank wrote:

The current crop of LEDs aren't very heavy but I've got two 10 year old Panasonic plasma sets (50" and 42") that would give you half a hernia if you tried to heft them yourself, especially the 50".
I wouldn't mind getting some new ones, but those old dogs- which are usually on a lot of hours each day- still work perfectly! Never had a hiccup.
Main downside is I live in the Deep South and they throw a lot of heat. Nice during the short, generally mild winter- not so nice the rest of the year.
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On 1/7/2019 1:49 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:

I guess there is a matter of the time frame and I don't know it and don't know when they first became available. Google tells me that sets and broadcasting HD came out in 1998.
Might have been 5 years since I got all HD TV's and as Ed responded they keep getting lighter, bigger and cheaper. I do remember even years ago you could not even give away or have a charity accept a perfectly functioning CRT TV.
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On 1/7/19 2:25 PM, Frank wrote:

Yeah, I paid almost three thousand dollars for the pair of them. Couple of hundred bucks each now....
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On 1/7/19 1:25 PM, Frank wrote:
[snip]

IIRC, there was already HDTV broadcasting in Japan.

In about 2005, a neighbor got a new LCD TV and got rid of a 40-inch rear-projection set. Put it out on the curb with a "free" sign on it. Nobody wanted it.
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Mark Lloyd
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On 1/7/19 9:48 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Free implies it's junk. Put a "For Sale $400 Firm" sign on it and some democrat will steal it.
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On 1/7/19 12:20 PM, Frank wrote:
[snip]

Before buying my main TV (LCD), I had a 27-inch CRT TV. That "portable" TV weighed 90 pounds.
BTW, the first HD TVs were CRT and cost as much as a new car. I knew someone who had a rear-projection TV with THREE CRTs.
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wrote:

A wall mount takes up no floor space and collects less dust
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Bill Gill wrote: "Not really any of my business, but is there a good reason to hang your TV on the wall? As far as I can see this is basically a fashion statement. I personally like to have "
Saves space, that's all. But I cannot abide mounting them above fireplace mantles - for any reason.
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On 1/7/19 8:13 AM, Bill Gill wrote:
[snip]

To make more efficient use of space. I do have a piece of furniture below the TV, but use that for a DVR.

I wound NOT do it for that reason.

Or just hang something there.

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On 1/7/2019 9:13 AM, Bill Gill wrote:

I still don't understand why people "have to" mount their TVs above a fireplace. The heat is probably no good for the TV and you have to keep your head looking way up. I was watching a home show the other night where they put a TV above a really tall fireplace. It was totally crazy. My preference is to have the TV so you look straight out from your main watching spot.
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On 1/8/2019 8:45 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

I found this and IMO, it is on the high side. I plan to raise the height by about 9" and it will be comfortable for us.
https://www.dynamicmounting.com/high-mount-flat-screen/ More and more people are discovering the advantages of wall-mounting their television every day.
Moving away from cumbersome TV stands allows you to save tons of room in your home, and creates a more unified and clean look to your home, keep reading to learn more.
There are several questions to ask before you mount your screen, however, not the least of which is how high to place the mount.
Learn about flat screen mounting, including how high up you should mount your TV and where you can get the best wall mount products for the job.
Flat Screen Mounting Determining the ideal height for your flat screen mounting isn’t as simple a proposition as you might think.
To discern the ideal height for mounting, you’ll need to understand several different aspects of the TV itself, including its size, the viewing distance, eye level height and the viewing angle.
Size of the TV This is self-explanatory and represents the viewing area of the TV.
Do you have a 32” TV? A 42”? 55”? Knowing the size of your TV will help you to determine the mounting. Remember, when mounting the TV, you’re not judging from floor to bottom or top, but floor to the center of the TV. Also, remember that your TV size is going to represent the diagonal viewing area. Thus, you’ll want to use a tape measure to figure out how far up and over the exact center of the screen is.
Viewing Distance The ideal viewing distance is also based on the size of the television, and is the perfect distance away from the screen you should be sitting when you watch. The calculation for this is your TV size, divided by 0.55. As a quick reference, for a 42” television, the optimal viewing distance is 76 inches away. For a 55”, you’ll want to be 100” away.
The optimal viewing for 65” TVs is 118”, and for 70” televisions, you’ll ideally want to be 127” away.
Eye Level from Floor and Viewing Angle Your eye level is calculated, not standing, but sitting where you’ll be watching the TV.
Measure the distance from the floor to your eyes to find out how high you’ll be sitting. In regards to viewing angle, per the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, you’ll want the TV to be mounted for a viewing angle of not more than 30 degrees. Most people, however, casually sit between 10 to 15 degrees reclined.
As a rule, a 42” television should be mounted about 56 inches from floor to TV center, a 55” TV should be around 61 inches, a 65” TV should be around 65 inches’ floor to center, and a 70” television should be mounted about 67 inches to the center of the screen.
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wrote:

They want their living room to look like their local sports bar.
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On 01/08/2019 07:03 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

Drunks puking on the floor? More noise than a 1600 ton Minster stamping press?
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My TV is 46". I had no trouble installing the wall mount stuff and lifting the TV in place. With 55" you might need help. You just lift the TV up and set it on the brackets. Some brackets come with places for pad locks.

Another poster declared wall mounting is a fad. BS. The TV can't fall over and it takes less room attached to the wall. So, looks better, saves space, works better, a perfect DIY improvement.
--
Dan Espen

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Most of them work much like a "french cleat" with a retainer screw to keep them from being knocked off.
How heavy is your TV?
I made the mistake of buying a cabinet to hold my 52 inch plasma -said it was good for 70 inch tv - andin small print "53 lbs" -- - - - Duh - the Panasonic plasma weighs 235 - - - - -
I wouldn't hang THAT on a 12 dollar wall bracket ---- I'd think twice - real hard - about hanging it at all-------
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