Tyvek for roof -- instead of felt?

On 10/12/2011 10:56 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Why wouldn't Tyvec get blown off as fast as shingles?
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OP again.
Since I "know" the people who had the house, I stopped by late yesterday and indeed, the roofers were using a Tyvek product that Red Green posted a link to way at the top of this thread.
Apparently they made a big deal about it in their estimate.
I only saw it from 90 yards away or so, but it LOOKED like the regular Tyvek housewrap with the big Tyvek name splashed all around. Again, follow the link Red thoughtfully provided at the top of the post.
IMHO, I would NEVER allow shingles to be placed without felt (or maybe Tyvek, now....).
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wrote:

It is a membrane material that is glued down. (usually peel and stick)
Grace Ice and water is a typical product although there are cheaper choices.
They also have tougher rules on the shingles. The leading edge on the eave needs to be cemented down, you need 6 nails per shingle and no staples.
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The product you saw was likely Permafelt, a plastic film underlayment. It is popular with local roofers because it it light, tear resistant and OK to walk around on. For the DIY crowd, it can stand the weather for several weeks or more. We used on our home place last summer and on a project house too. Far easier to apply than felt and more of a water barrier. There may be other brands...Permafelt is what Menards carries.
Joe
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I also saw "Liquid Applied Tyvek" - ie, like a paint
I am intrigued by it but when I needed it last year it was only test marketed in Texas so I had to use elastomeric paint instead.
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Tyvek now makes several sythetic roofing underlayments. I myself do not lik e felt as it can absorb moisture. I am sceptical of some synthetic underlay s because they dont 'breathe' or allow moist air to escapw from attic so if you use sythetic pls make sure you add ridge vent or beef up your ventilat ion. Im doing a steep roof now. About 10/12...i will use self-adhereing eav e protection to beyond inside face of interior wall, in valleys, and around perimeter and i intend to use Gaf underlay which i believe is similar to t yvek (probable is with a different name and jacked up price) and is breathe -able. And btw tyvek sheds water and is used mainly to make home exteriors water resistant until cladding can be installed so makes sense it would wor k if there is enough slope. -dylan -construction engineering technician
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On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 00:44:34 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The tar impregnated roofing felt can't absorb enough water to be an issue and it has been used for about 100 years.It breathes. The Tyvek type membrane works pretrty good too - it passes vapour but not liquid. It weighs less than felt but felt is bad enough on a steep roof - the tyvek may blow around a lot more making it more difficult to install. The Blue-seal type self adhesive membrane is getting pretty popular up here but it IS more expensive. It does seal around roofing nails, guaranteeing you get a rain-tite roof but you DO need proper ventilation.
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