Tub problem


We just bought a house with a fiberglass tub. There is a leak and yes at the drain. The tub has movement...you can feel it. So, after opening first floor ceiling the problem is right there...the tub is not bedded and will start leaking again. In fact I found out from the plumber he'd did the same repiar....tightneing nut and plumbers putty three time in the last two years. The question is it seems like it's easier to change out to a cast iron tub rather than trying to set this one into mortar mix. The house is in CA so in addition to normal movement of settling we get the occassional earthquake some which aren't strong but still shake and twist.
Suggestions!
Thanks
Terry
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Terry Cano wrote:

You may be right about it being easier to swap it out for a cast iron (or maybe steel) tub. I have heard of injecting expanding foam under a tub like this, although I haven't done it myself. Could be worth looking into.
Jim
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Embedding doesn't take much concrete. Have you checked manufacturers site? Fixed a shower once with a few cans of the expanding foam.

tub
in
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Terry,
I just finished removing an old cast iron tub and replacing it with a new fiberglass whirlpool tub. If I were you I would avoid putting in a cast iron tub. They are very heavy and very difficult to move. The fiberglass tub that I installed required only two people to move & install. Since you have to remove the wall board and tile regardless of which tub you decide the easiest way to go would be setting your existing tub in a bed of cement. You really don't need that much cement. The Kohler tub I purchased required a 2" layer of cement in a small area underneath the basin of the tub (equivelent to two 3 gallon buckets of cement). Since the drains for your tub are already aligned with the existing plumbing in the house there will be no need to worry about re-aligning the drains if you were go install a cast iron tub. If you decide to keep your existing tub and put a cement bed underneath it make you you put down a plastic drop cloth between the tub and cement. This will allow you to remove the tub at a later date if you need to.
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We founf out today this is the third "glass tube" in the house in less than 15 years. The first one cracked. The problem is there is no bed.....as you suggested. Glass tubs don't do well without out it ...they prone to crack and have problems. We may go the bed route and do it from below to avoid breaking out the tiles. Thanks....you are right iron tubs are pretty heavy!!!
Terry

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tub
in
I think you should count your blessings. Look at the problems you COULD HAVE with your tub:
http://tinyurl.com/wn0
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Changing to a cast iron tub may not be a panacea. I just installed a Kohler cast iron tub and had difficulty getting a leak free joint at the drain. I hope it is leak free now.
The only good thing is that it can be repaired from above the tub. Kohler's drain is made with two small protrusions inside the drain that are intended to be engaged by a pair of pliers that are stuck down into the drain. You then turn them to unscrew the drain and new plumber's putty can be placed under the drain flange. Retighten the drain flange and you may be fixed.
RB
Terry Cano wrote:

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RB wrote:

If you continue to have problems, try adding a little silicone (caulk) to the putty. Or, skip the putty and use a bead of clear silicone caulk.
The only drawback to using just caulk is that it may be more difficult to get the drain fitting apart again:-(
Jim
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Thanks.
Do you have an opinion on the best way to connect the brass tail piece (scratch threaded brass piece) exiting horizontally from the tee to 1-1/2 schedule 40 PVC. The drain assembly, including the tail piece is made by Kohler.
My drain is 2" schedule 40 PVC but I need a short piece on 1-1/2" PVC connected to the tail piece to make it over a Glu-Lam. I don't want to notch the Glu-Lam.
RB
Speedy Jim wrote:

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