Replacing Fan Motor - AC condenser unit

The motor that spins the fan on the condenser unit outside my home
seized up today. I noticed that house fan was running, but cold air was
not blowing out the vents for the central air. When I went outside to
check the condenser unit the fan was not spinning, the motor was
humming, and was extremely hot to the touch.
I thought I had heard a squealing sound over the past couple weeks when
the AC unit would start in the early morning sometime, so I assume the
bearings in the fan motor seized. Is fixing this as straight forward as
buying a replacement motor, removing the old motor, and attaching the
fan to the new motor? Or is it likely that when the fan motor died it
took out other components with it (such as condenser coil or compressor)?
The specs I read off the side of the current motor:
Emerson
Model #: KA55HXCRK-9885
Part #: 8101-551
Volt: 230/208
Hz: 60
Amp: 1.7
PH 1
I think motors like these would be replacements:
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Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Reply to
Beowulf
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"Beowulf" wrote in message
Pretty much. Use care not to bend the fan blades. Clean them while they are off also.
Or is it likely that when the fan motor died it
Anything can happen, but unlikely
This has the same amp draw as your so it is probably the correct one. The other two are 1/2 HP while this is 1/4. See if the nameplate says what yours is.
You can also check
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and perhaps cross reference your motor to be sure.
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski
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Thanks for the reassurance that my assumptions were heading in the right direction. Thanks for the pointers on finding a replacement motor, as well.
Reply to
Beowulf
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Why not hire a competent tech to replace the motor and have them service your equipment while they're there? It could save you more money in the long run by having them do the service.
Reply to
<kjpro
Beowulf writes:
Yes, but you *must* match the horsepower and rpms of the old motor, because they are matched to the fan blade and other geometry. A mismatch will typically overheat the motor and the thermal cutout makes it quit.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Beowulf writes:
Also, you're going to likely have a bear of a time getting the old fan blade off the old motor shaft if you don't have a proper puller tool, which is hard to find and $$$. If you buy the motor at an appliance repair supplier, they might be able to pull the blade off for you.
Do NOT hammer the fan blade onto the new motor's shaft. You will ruin the new bearings.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
As far as the replacement motor (ex. Grainger)...it will (most likely) be a half-shaft/easy-on. Tighten securely.
Reply to
pheeh.zero
Which brings up the topic of temperature rating. Had a motor replaced by an AC guy one summer. The following spring, during a preseason check, the AC tech (different company) told me that the replacement motor was a lower temp rating than it should be, might not last as long as it should.
Moral of this story - pay attention to the motor's temperature rating too.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry
: The motor that spins the fan on the condenser unit outside my home : seized up today. I noticed that house fan was running, but cold air was : not blowing out the vents for the central air. When I went outside to : check the condenser unit the fan was not spinning, the motor was : humming, and was extremely hot to the touch.
: I thought I had heard a squealing sound over the past couple weeks when : the AC unit would start in the early morning sometime, so I assume the : bearings in the fan motor seized. Is fixing this as straight forward as : buying a replacement motor, removing the old motor, and attaching the : fan to the new motor? Or is it likely that when the fan motor died it : took out other components with it (such as condenser coil or compressor)?
: The specs I read off the side of the current motor: : Emerson : Model #: KA55HXCRK-9885 : Part #: 8101-551 : Volt: 230/208 : Hz: 60 : Amp: 1.7 : PH 1
: I think motors like these would be replacements: :
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: Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Another thing to consider replacing is the starter cap.
Reply to
kmy
Most of us work pretty hard to take home that $340 difference. I'd certainly do it myself for that type of savings. If I was making big bucks, like an HVAC tech, I'd have it done rather than get my hands dirty.
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski
One way to save some money if you can is to call a local vocational school and see if there is a HVAC student who is looking to gain some experience.
They generally can do a simple repair as that and at the same time helps them with working on real equipment.
But this all depend on where you live. Over twenty years ago I did the same when I was a student. Our school would allow us to go out and we would charge 1 % over cost and that money went back into the school for class room supplies.
Reply to
Moe Jones
HVAC techs make good money because the job sucks. I know, I spent a few years outside in the heat, up in attics/crawl spaces in 130+ degrees where two of us had to take turns. And way back then it wasn't good money like today.
Reply to
Meat Plow
"Meat Plow" wrote in message
In most of the free world, we have a choice in how we make out living. Since you thought the job sucked, you changed so good for you.
Some jobs are better left to the pro, but changing a fan motor is fairly simple for anyone mechanically inclined and can save a lot of money. I find it easier to pay for an oil change in my car, had a roofer do the shingles, I cleaned my oil fired boiler once and decided to pay after that, but I've yet to call a plumber, painter, landscaper.
I've spent many a hot hour at my job. If anyone want to join me in the boiler room this summer, I'm available. Or how about making adjustments between the platens of a machine that uses that steam? Fortunately, as the business grew I hired people to do a lot of that and I spend half my day in the air conditioned office now.
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski
You don't get it...
The HVAC guy is going to do the work PROPERLY, do it right the first time and then check the system out to make sure it's operating efficiently.
Can YOU do that???
Then you have the extra time for your family or hobbies...
Reply to
<kjpro
wrote in message
You don't get it. Yes, I can do all of that and with a savings of $300, I can have more money for my hobbies or to take my family to dinner. Changing out a fan motor is far different than installing a system that, I agree, should be left to a pro. In the past month, I did, in fact, swap out two fan motors. One took me 30 minutes, the other about 50 minutes. Not a bad way to earn $600.
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski
You don't get it...
If he was able to do this job correctly, he wouldn't be asking questions on it here!!!!
And you obviously have never ran a business if you think the $300/600 is pure profit.
Reply to
<kjpro
wrote in message
He may not be capable of checing the workings of the machine, but changing a motor is pretty straightforard.
I do run a business so I'm very aware of spending money. That $300 is not pure profit for the AC company, but it is a $300 expense for the buyer and it takes a lot of sales to make that much more to cover expenses. Since you know about running a business, is it easier to cut $300 in expenses or to find $3000 in new business?
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski

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