Permitting: rat on neighbor?



No, he didn't. Did you bother to actually read what you quoted below?

That doesn't say that he needed a permit. It doesn't even say that he thought he did. All it says is that he took the time to read up on the regs -- so the only conclusion possible from that statement is that he thought he *might*.
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<stuff snipped>

thought
the
*might*.
Point Miller. That was my take on it. Maybe, maybe not, but not enough info to be sure. Service!
-- Bobby G.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Need permits for everything where I live, but they aren't enforced. My condo put in an enclosure for dumpster but not for recycling bins. Higher than code, but got permission. Looks like a toilet stall with recycling bins standing next to it. Supposed to match the structure, but it doesn't.
As for the OP, if a neighbor across the street was putting in a carport/crapport, I'd be inclined to complain. No mention of size, property lines, views, etc. All can impact the neighbors. A shed is a heck of a lot easier to move or remove that a double driveway with extra cars, mowers, trash cans, etc.
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wrote:

Yeah, there is definitely some hypocrisy involved here. However, he still has a vaild concern. Putting up a shed that's in a backyard, hidden from view, conforming to all codes, etc is different than someone putting up a carport/garage/driveway that is visible from the street. And it could have an impact on his property value.
I also don't think it's incumbent upon him to go figure out what the neighbor is doing and IF it conforms to code. First, he doesn't know what the guy is building. Should he wait until it's all up, complete with roof, then the ultimate result is the neighbor has to tear it down? That's worse for everyone. Second, without being a code professional and having inspected it, he can't tell how it's built, whether it conforms to codes, etc.
If it were me, I'd send an anonymous letter to the code officials. When you undertake doing something like this you know going in the risk you run is getting caught one way or another. And you do it because you want to save a few bucks, cut corners, or you don't think it will be approved and that is more important than the neighbors.
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On 6/16/2010 8:44 AM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

If he lived in my area it is OK to install a shed up to 120 square feet without a permit and that isn't unusual. You just need to observe setbacks as the OP noted he did.

You sound like you jump to conclusions very easily without interpreting the facts...
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What's legal in your area is irrelevant.

You've obviously never lived with neighbors who have nothing better to do than play zoning cop. They're easy to spot.
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On 6/16/2010 9:57 AM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Not at all. Since the OP didn't state where they are then a generalized discussion is totally relevant.

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On 6/16/10 8:23 AM, woger151 wrote:

Guys like you got the snot beat out of them on the school playground...
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What comes around, goes around...
As a rule I don't call the city on any of my neighbors for anything. Even those I despise.
I would like to call the city on a couple of people, but I figure if I start doing that stuff, then they will return the favor...
Then that would tick me off and I would find something else to call about to "get even". Then before you know it, all out war! I think I have better things to do.
Same thing goes for my "nosy" lady neighbor and her wanting to tell me gossip about the other neighbors. I call her "Gladys Kravitz". I don't want to hear it and I have better things to do...
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<stuff snipped>

want
You're showing your (our!) age with a Bewitched reference. Even older: Let he who is without sin make the first zoning complaint.
-- Bobby G.
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Smitty Two wrote:

Your points are well taken.
It's possible, however, that the neighbor lived there BEFORE annexation and/or zoning and/or permitting.
That said, I live in a city in excess of 5.5 million people. We don't have zoning or a permitting process that much interests the city. (I think they check on building permits for buildings taller than eight stories.)
My attitude is decidedly different toward zoning and permit compliance. In our part of the country, we tend to deal with miscreants directly.
It may be that the construction actually ENHANCES the neighborhood.
You have several options: 1. Do nothing. The legal principle involved is called "acquiescence by silence." If you don't like the project, you are obligated to speak up at the first opportunity. After that, your silence implies agreement. 2. Visit the neighbor. Tell him if his project ends up looking like the entrance to a trailer park, you and your neighbors will come beat the snot out of him. 3. Snitch the neighbor out to the nannies. You can attempt to do so "anonymously" but you WILL be discovered (nine times out of ten for one determined on vengence). 3. Anything other than #1 invites retaliation. Sometimes retaliation out of all proportion. Like scorched earth.
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I agree. When my neighbor fenced his yard, I was vaguely aware that there were some rules about sight lines from driveways but I didn't pursue it. His non-conforming fence basically runs all along my driveway to the sidewalk. By code, it should have stopped 15 feet short of the sidewalk. And now I see why: as I'm backing up out of the driveway, I'm scared to death one of his kids will shoot out from behind that fence on a tricycle or something. In retrospect there was a darn good reason for the rule and I wish I'd spoken up earlier. -- H
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Heathcliff wrote: <snip>

there's nothing preventing you from doing so now. the city would make him remove the fence if it doesn't meet code.
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news:e4ecab94-7622-4e5b-b681-
<stuff snipped>
<I agree. When my neighbor fenced his yard, I was vaguely aware that there were some rules about sight lines from driveways but I didn't pursue it. His non-conforming fence basically runs all along my driveway to the sidewalk. By code, it should have stopped 15 feet short of the sidewalk. And now I see why: as I'm backing up out of the driveway, I'm scared to death one of his kids will shoot out from behind that fence on a tricycle or something. In retrospect there was a darn good reason for the rule and I wish I'd spoken up earlier. -- H>
As a guy whom the very hand of God stopped me from backing over a little girl on a pink a tricycle under very similar circumstances, I would consider sending in an anonymous letter. Your issue is clearly a case of public safety because as you've said, you've got to be able to see to be sure. In my case - something - I can't say what, made me suddenly brake only to see the image of a little girl appearing from behind my car. She was never visible to me until that moment. Since then I've cut down all the shrubs in the front right of way and try to back in the driveway whenever possible so I don't have to back into the street butt first.
It's a very weird feeling to know you've just gotten a pass on what could have been the worst thing in quite a few people's lives. Drop the dime. You've got a much better reason than the the OP to see a change made. There isn't a time I back down the driveway without seeing her in my mind and thinking about how my life would have changed had I not decided to suddenly stop.
Cyclists under age 16 accounted for 24% of all cyclists killed in 2002. (Insurance Institute for Highway Saftey)
-- Bobby G.
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On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 05:23:53 -0700 (PDT), woger151
Walk across the street and ask the guy. No biggy.
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On 6/16/2010 6:15 PM, Oren wrote:

Why not just butt out? What business is it of the OP?
Jay
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wrote:

I figure that if the project doesn't affect the "complainer",and the guy doing the project hasn't done something negative to the "complainer" in the past,then the "complainer" should MYOB.
Instead of trying to be a busybody or "junior lawman".
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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That way he'll know who ratted?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 19:27:44 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

No he learns from the one person, that talks to him directly.
Sometimes in a situation, one needs to explain things in simple terms.
What I mean? Talk to the neighbor!

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If you do rat on him, there is absolutely nothing to be gained doing it before job completion. At that time, he may have the options of: paying for the permit plus a vig if the work meets specs, applying for a variance, or having to remove it all.
All ratting is a matter of balance, and you must ahead of time weigh the benefits and downsides to see if it is even worth stirring the brew. I had a zoning inspector come out once because a rat turned me in for having a little travel trailer parked next to my house. Technically, it was illegally parked, but he did mention that I did have the right to move it to the FRONT of the house and put it on the horseshoe driveway, and it would comply. I did that. He mentioned that one of my Tough Sheds was not set back far enough. I mentioned that I could show him at least a dozen that were within a block that were also not in compliance, and that if he were to cite me, that I would certainly appear at a county commissioners meeting and wail discrimination that I was cited, and the other dozen not. That issue died.
If it is not an atrocious looking thing your neighbor is doing, I'd just back off, lest you have an inspector out there, and you would have to move your shed, too.
Your property value is based on YOUR property, and the neighborhood, and unless all of your neighborhood is DIY Joe McGee's, one shouldn't affect your valuation that much.
Steve
Visit my site at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com book coming soon!
All errors, brain farts, misspelled words intentional because this computer is set to Spelchek French, and I can't get it to do any different.
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