Gas pipe blocking oven from being pushed against the wall

When i bought my new house, the old oven here sat on an appliance roller. Hauled both out to the street to install our new oven. That's when we realised there is a gas pipe coming out of the foundation about 4 inches from the wall, 4-5 inches tall. We can't push the oven in, and a scrapper already took the appliance roller. Can i build a platform for my oven? Is it safe to have my oven above the pipe? Definitely can't afford to tear into the slab foundation to move the pipe..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2017 1:14 PM, Alyssa Snell wrote:

How much clearance do you need? A plumber can cut and re-thread the pipe so it is a couple of inches shorter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27-Oct-17 12:33 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

...

Sure, that's at least one reason the cart was there for before...bad placement on having it that far from the wall to begin with, though, fur shure...but there's no real problem with simply raising the range enough to clear as long as the extra height isn't an issue from just using the range for a comfort standpoint.

+1
If go that route, I'd ask him to shorten it to just about as close to slab as can and install elbow to return the actual access point to the wall location and then put the cutoff and flex connection point there where shoulda' been to begin with...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2017 1:14 PM, Alyssa Snell wrote:

Are you sure there is not a plastic sleeve around the gas pipe?
It is a violation of gas piping code for concrete to be in direct contact with natural gas pipe.  There should be a plastic sleeve between the concrete and the gas pipe.  If the sleeve is present, it  should be a simple matter to swap out the pipe with a shorter one.
And FWIW, the builder screwed up by not putting the gas/electric service in the industry standard locations.
See page 2 for illustration:
https://www.whirlpool.com/content/dam/global/documents/201508/dimension-guide-W10620413-D-WH.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at 3:28:49 PM UTC-5, Emma Trohl wrote:

We have no idea when this house was built.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at

It was built tomorrow, wtf does that matter?l maybe some flex pipe is needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at 5:29:42 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:

It matters because another poster claimed it's a code violation to have a gas pipe in contact with concrete. From the question, it's not clear the pipe is directly in contact. But for any code violation, it would depend on where it is and when it was built. Generally, new code does not apply retroactively.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at 6:09:48 PM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

Thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at 7:46:36 PM UTC-4, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

OP "when I bought my new house"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at 9:02:36 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:

Followed by:
"the old oven here sat on an appliance roller. Hauled both out to the street to install our new oven"
The house is apparently new to the poster, but not new construction, so we have no idea when it was built.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2017 07:09 PM, trader_4 wrote:

"That's when we realised there is a gas pipe coming out of the foundation about 4 inches from the wall, 4-5 inches tall."
Sounds embedded in slab to me.  Hopefully they used a plastic sleeve.

steel pipe + damp concrete = corrosion/pitting/holes over time
What could possibly go wrong?  Or does compliance with old code make it safe?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27-Oct-17 6:09 PM, trader_4 wrote: ...

AFAIK it has never been within UBC to have direct pour slab around black pipe w/o approved sleeve/protective wrap irregardless of age...not that everybody always followed Code even if were supposed to, of course...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Regardless is enough. You don't need "irregatdlrss".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2017 9:41 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

But "irregatdlrss" is a different meaning
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 27, 2017 at 4:29:42 PM UTC-5, Thomas wrote:

Yes, it does matter because Emma Trohl (troll) states what was done was against industry standards. Depending on when the house was built, there could have been no industry standards. So fuck yes, it does matter.
Before you decide to bite my head off again, proofread what you post as your last sentence makes no sense at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.