Fireplace in a shed?!

I came across a shed today, 8x6m, brick built, with a slate roof, and a chimney! Not a boiler or wood burning stove type thing, but a traditional brick chimney. Any idea as to why someone would do that? It was seperate from the house, by a distance of about 8m.
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I came across a shed today, 8x6m, brick built, with a slate roof, and a chimney! Not a boiler or wood burning stove type thing, but a traditional brick chimney. Any idea as to why someone would do that? It was seperate from the house, by a distance of about 8m.
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On Mon, 04 Mar 2019 15:45:10 -0000

That was where they heated the water in a big tub called a copper to do the laundry. As recently as the 1920s, apparently, as a house I lived in had one, and my mum remembered using one. When washing machines and domestic hot water arrived the coppers were removed but the chimneys remained.
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Ah, I knew about coppers (for taking a bath in), but I thought they were filled from kettles on stoves in the kitchen.
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That is correct, My old grans house had one and even when I was a kid in Wandsworth the flat we had had one and we used to bath in a tin bath filled from jugs from the copper. It was great fun watching my parents trying to lift the tin bath to the drain to tip the water away as well. Brian
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Sounds like a lot of hassle, I would have just walked to the nearest river to take a bath.

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Commander Kinsey wrote:

My bath is much too small and the bathroom is not big enough for a big one and as I live in a semi rural area with tons of wood I have been entertaining thoughts of an external bath hut with a wood burner water heater,( need a "round tuit" )
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Just take a cold bath, soap works in cold water.
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On 05/03/2019 16:51, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Washing with soap is a chemical process, and chemical reactions are faster at higher temperatures. Why do you think washing machines have heaters in them?
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wrote:

Nope, its actually a physical process where the oils are included in the dissolved soap so that is carried away from the skin by the water.

But you can wash the clothes in cold water fine and I always do that.
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On 05/03/2019 19:25, Rod Speed wrote:

You need special detergent to do that. I don't know whether it's as effective.
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wrote:

Nope, that's how normal soap works.

Much better actually, no need to lather up.
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wrote:

Nothing but cold water wash for the last 8 or 10 years. no problems - except you need to run a special cleaner in hot water to get rid of corrosive soap buildup on some machines (LG foe sure!!!"
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wrote:

I've been doing it for more than 45 years now.
One minor irritation is with the dark blue T shirts I now wear all the time, with powdered detergent you end up with a quite visible scum in bands due to the detergent not dissolving completely. Not visible on any of the other stuff that gets washed, just the dark blue T shirts.
Easily fixed by using a liquid detergent you can see thru.

Don't get that with either of the two top loaders I have used.
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Why do you think washing machines have a cold wash selection? Why do you think Germans all wash with cold water? Design the soap right, you don't need heat.
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wrote:

around here years back there would often be a "summer kitchen" detatched from the house. Or it could have been a shop with a forge - or a bakery - or a butcher shop with a smoke-house - 8X6 meters is a pretty good sized out-building - almost the size of my house - - -
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I have made an error, I meant 8x6 feet! We use feet and metres in the UK.... This is why I was confused as to them having a fireplace in such a small building.
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On 04/03/2019 15:45, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Enthusiastic woodworkers often burn offcuts to keep their workshops warmer in winter. Brick built stack is a bit OTT but if they are building the rest out of bricks, they might choose to use all bricks.
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This shed had a slate roof so was either very old, or as you say built by an enthusiast.
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On 04/03/2019 16:56, Commander Kinsey wrote:

My 30 sqm workshop has a slate roof over concrete blocks clad with timber mainly for appearance. No heating needed as it is very well insulated and comfortable to work in all year round. I think I fit into the "enthusiast" group too or maybe that is OCD?
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