Discoloration in toilet bowl

I applied "Scrubbing Bubbles" bathroom cleaner and "Ajax with Bleach" powder cleanser on the inside of the toilet bowl then used a stainless-steel scouring pad.
When I flushed the toilet, I noticed a slight grey discoloration below the water line.
I tried removing the discoloration by repeating the original process but the discoloration remains.
How can I remove the discoloration? Can I use straight vinegar, straight bleach or other product?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/14/18 11:55 PM, condo owner wrote:

Wonder if the steel scouring pad took the glaze off...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/14/2018 11:55 PM, condo owner wrote:

At least once a week I put a glug or two of bleach in the toilet bowl and let it sit. Always looks clean.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/14/2018 11:55 PM, condo owner wrote:

Iron Out often works as does bleach and bowl cleaners with HCl. Steel pads may scratch porcelain and form more surface to catch stains.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at 11:55:12 PM UTC-5, condo owner wrote:

You shouldn't be using steel pads or any other abrasive on finished porcelain. If it's a ring around the water line or similar, it's likely mineral deposits which can be easily removed with a product like CLR or hydrochloric acid.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I know what I shouldn't have used.
But now how do I remove the grey residue on the toilet bowl?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try baking soda.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/15/2018 01:03 PM, condo owner wrote:

Try hydrochloric acid or maybe phosphoric.
Note: do not try hydrochloric and Clorox at the same time or you'll have bigger problems than a gray stain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I drained the toilet bowl and plugged the hole with paper towels and spread paper towels on the sides of the bowl.
I then poured a 1/2 gallon of straight bleach onto the paper towels and let it soak for several hours.
But that did NOT remove any of the discoloration.
So now I will try the baking soda
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/15/18 5:13 PM, condo owner wrote:

When the plumber comes to remove the paper towel wad lodged 10 feet downstream in your waste pipe, why not ask him how to get the discoloration out ;-)
--
Ever notice the shortage of "armed law-abiding citizen” victim tragedy
stories in the news?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, November 15, 2018 at 5:14:04 PM UTC-5, condo owner wrote:

I told you what your problem is and what to do. You have mineral deposits. Bleach won't remove it. Apply a product like CLR or hydrochloric acid. What's there now is the mineral deposit plus some metal from using a steel pad. You should never use that or any abrasive on porcelain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 15 Nov 2018 14:13:59 -0800 (PST), condo owner wrote:

Bleach just bleaches. And kills. It doesn't remove.
While shutting valves and draining the bowl is fine, it's not worth the effort, IMHO. Neither is scrubbing (and there's that glaze to worry about).
Do you have hard water?
If you have hard water, and if you own a pool (or if you have a friend with a pool), just ask for about a quart or two of hydrochloric acid. I think that's 30% by (weight? volume?).
If you have hard water but no pool, I would think muriatic acid at Home Depot or Lowes is good enough although I don't know the concentration difference with 29% pool acid (which is what I use).
Once you use the pool acid for hard water problems, you'll wonder why they even have those toilet bowl cleaning aisles in the super markets.
For example, 5% glacial vinegar is child's play compared to 29% HCl.
As for the fumes, yeah, they're what the Germans used in WWI, so hold your breath, turn the fan on, pour, walk away - catch your breath - and then hold it again to come back to swish around, and walk away - and then come back to swish some more, walk away, etc.
It's easier to do than it is to explain.
Flush well when done, not so much for the toilet, but for the pipes (Lord help your septic system even so).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wrong with the crap in glass bottles that is there because someone has been too stupid to wash them after the contents have been consumed.

Wrong. It still used to clean bricks after bricklaying.
so hold your

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No plumber needed.
The paper towels did NOT get lodged in the waste pipe.
Now, returning to my original question: How do I get the discoloration out?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Assuming that's metal from the steel wool, I think you need an abrasive like Comet. Try a plastic scrub pad first.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 15 Nov 2018 15:53:09 -0800 (PST), condo owner wrote:

If you have hard water, you have to listen to the folks who said to use HCl.
You can get "pool acid" at a pool store (29%) or at a hardware store (Home Depot, Lowes).
One gallon will set you back about five bucks or so.
If you don't have hard water, then I don't know what it is.
However, the moment I see anyone suggesting "baking soda", I know they're clueless, since it's an alkaline carbonate. What the heck are you expecting an alkaline bicarbonate to do? Magic?
Every time I see someone mention "baking soda", I have to wonder how their brain works. Think about what "chemical" it is you're trying to remove. Then think about what "chemical" removes it.
I can't think of a single "chemical", for example, that sodium bicarbonate removes in a house. Can you?
The only reason NOT to try the HCl is if you're too scared to use it. Then, fine. Use whatever you can find in the toilet-bowl cleaning aisle.
It will cost ten times more, and work ten times less efficiently, but it will smell ten thousand times better than does HCl (which doesn't smell, but when you get a whiff of it, you'll KNOW it instantly).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bicarbonate.

Neutralise acids. And can be used as abrasive that is easy to get rid of when you are finished with it.

Nope.

Yep, acids.

No toilet bowl cleaning aisle in any of my supermarkets.

Corse it does.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Nov 2018 19:54:41 +1100, Rod Speed wrote:

Hi Rod Speed,
Knowledge on the net for baking soda seems to be 99.99% old wives' tales to 0.01% chemistry.
For example, it's not a bi carbonate (it has only 1 carbon).
The name is an archaic holdover from before the times that they named chemicals by the current naming conventions.

I'm trying to understand how baking soda works for the millions of things that Arm & Hammer loves to advertise it does.
Certainly baking soda, as an alkali, will neutralize acids, but what acids need to be neutralized in the home outside of baking?
It certainly is abrasive, and washes away afterward, so I agree with you that it's great 'sandpaper', but I don't see any chemistry that proves it works as a deodorizer in a general sense (only very specific vapors under very specific circumstances, all of which require lots of surface area, which you can get by sprinkling on a carpet but not with an open box in the frig).
On baking soda, it seems to be 99.99% old wives' tales to 0.01% chemistry.
I have a five pound bag that I can't find any decent use for outside of cooking, and using as a super mild abrasive (for which I have no need since Ajax works better, IMHO, and that contains, literally, sand).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Its not that bad.

The bi isnt referring to the number of carbons.

Its more complicated than that.

Its not just used to neutralise those acids most obviously when used with vinegar to clear drains, it’s the foaming effect that works.

Like with odours in fridges where you want something which wont contaminate the food in the fridge.

Not when you are deodorising the fridge or say one of the soft plastic containers that you have had a more smelly than usual curry in etc.

It does in fact deodorise a fridge quite effectively and isnt a problem if you manage to spill it etc.

Its not that bad.

Sure, but baking powder works better with food containers. I've had a few that I have managed to forget about which have had the contents go mouldy which has meant that the soft plastic container has got marked and baking soda works better than ajax with those.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As Antonio Villaraigosa (the ex-mayor of Los Angeles) said during a 2006 immigration-march speech, "We clean your toilets!".
My toilet is now spot-fee and scratch-free! To remove the "gunk", I used bleach, Ajax and vinegar. To remove the scratches, I used Bar Keepers Friend.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.