Corn

When you shop for corn on the cob, do you pull down the husk before you buy it to look inside?
Do you ever reject corn because it doesn't look good?
What does "not look good" mean? Why would you reject an ear of corn?
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On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 2:14:18 PM UTC-7, micky wrote:

Yes and yes. If it's typical yellow corn, I look for kernels that are still whitish, indicating that it's not yet ripe. A good test is to pierce a kernel with your thumb nail. If it squirts juice, it's ripe; If not, it's either premature or dead.
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wrote:

Just buy it fresh from the neighbours stand ... any modern road-side stand will have good fresh corn - no need to check., Many years ago, when charged with getting corn for The Family Rebellion - we picked-our-own, without checking - and discovered a lot of worms .. we just cut out the bad parts & it was ok .. I have never seen that in any farm-stands. The other thing to check for is freshness - do the kernels look bursting with freshness ? or a little limp ? We would almost never buy from a grocery store. John T.
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On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 18:02:17 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Hearlies on Erb Street between Waterloo and St Agatha has the BEST sweet corn in Ontario - bar none!!!
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wrote:

... in the Rural Post this week :
https://wrruralpost.com/where-freshness-makes-the-difference-herrles/
John T.
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On 8/14/2019 5:14 PM, micky wrote:

Corn is genetically modified, covered in glyphosate and has a high glycemic index.  It's basically a cancer trifecta.  Why anyone would eat that shit is beyond me.
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On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 18:11:37 -0400, Grumpy Old White Guy

You must be Cherman - it's only recently that Germans eat corn - kernel or on cob - it's always been "pig feed"
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On 8/14/2019 6:40 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

You must be a racist?
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Get off my lawn!


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On 8/14/2019 6:11 PM, Grumpy Old White Guy wrote:

Because it tastes good? Grilled, with butter and salt. Yummmmmmm!
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On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 6:11:44 PM UTC-4, Grumpy Old White Guy wro te:

ic index.  It's basically a cancer trifecta.  Why anyone would ea t that shit is beyond me.
Because it's tasty. A few ears of sweet corn a year won't hurt anybody.
Cindy Hamilton
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wrote:

If the kernals are shrivelled or undersize or not mature (still white) or wormy - or so ripe they are hard.
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On 8/14/2019 5:14 PM, micky wrote:

If you buy it at a local farm stand, changs are it is very good. Maybe a part of one ear in a season is sub par but usually they are excellent.
I never buy corn at the supermarket.
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On 08/14/2019 03:14 PM, micky wrote:

After you pull the husk back you nibble a little bit to make sure it's sweet...
Not look good might mean the worms got there first or the ear didn't fill out.
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wrote:

I always peel the top of the ear back a little. That is where the worms will usually be, right up by the tassel. I also want to be sure what color it is. A lot of people will shuck it right there in the store, they even have a trash can there just for that but I like to cook it in the husk. These days with all of the chemicals they use, worms and bugs are pretty rare. Back in Maryland with little farms that wasn't the case. Most of the time people would cut the first couple inches off without even looking. They didn't want to know about the worms.
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 15 Aug 2019 01:39:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Doesn't it dry out if you shuck it in the store?

They still do in Md.

I've never seen a worm. I've only seen one bad piece of corn that I can remember, only because the rows were uneven and parts had no kernels, but what was there was fine.
If I'm within a half mile of a farm stand, I'll go, but I'm usually not, and I'm usually at the grocery store for other groceries, so I buy corn there.
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On 08/15/2019 12:19 AM, micky wrote:

Also something you don't see is all the chemicals slathered on to kill the worms...
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wrote:

That is the truth. When I was seeing worms in corn it was an old mom and pop farm where they were not doing a lot of spraying. Back in the 60-70s there were still a lot of ~40 acre farms in PG County. Now that is all houses, strip malls or garden apartments.
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Actually, core ear worms have developed resistence to most pesticides. However, chemical methods do seem to work (e.g. a drop of mineral oil on the ear bud suffocates them) and integrated pest management (IPM) techniques developed back in the 80's have also shown good results.
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wrote:

The biggest advancement against wormy corn has been Genetic Modification - making the corn resistant to corn borer so chemicals are less required.
Much of the effective pesticide application is done at the soil level - "band application" - not sprayed on the plant or "slathered on" AN example in corn is "Mustang".
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On 8/15/2019 3:22 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

BigAg and BigFarmChem thoroughly tested GMOs and farm chemicals so they are totally safe for you.  No need to worry.
In fact, it wouldn't hurt to give your dinner a quick spritz of Roundup before serving to make sure you got all the bugs dead.
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