What kind of critter eats flowers?

Over the course of the last two weeks something has bitten off the stems of the flours on four different plants at about 4 to 8 inches and then bitten
off and removed/eaten/dragged off the flowers from the other end, leaving the severed, beheaded stem. One plant was an anemone robustissima. The ot her were some delphinium that I'd bought this year and which bloomed before they were two feet tall. The stems were very thin, so it suggests a small critter. I've wrestled with woodchuck problems over the years, and would expect much more devestation if it were a woodchuck. Any ideas as to what this might be and what I might do about it? I'm going to set out a have-a- heart trip with a bouquet of the remaining blooming delphinium in it as bai t.
tia las
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On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 11:53:04 -0700 (PDT)

My culprits were deer and rabbits. Fence was the solution. Deer only have incisors on the bottom. So they have to tear stuff off leaving a ragged stem torn on the top side. Rabbits nip stuff off clean like shears. Deer will try most anything and step on lots of stuff in the process...
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On 20/06/2020 22:22, Leon Fisk wrote:

Squirels and mice can do that as well
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On 6/20/2020 11:53 AM, LAS14 LAS14 wrote:

If, as suggested in other replies here, the problem is either deer, rabbits, or squirrels, I have heard a suggestion. This might even work for mice but not for raccoons, oppossums, or rats.
Make small cloth bags (old bed linens, underware, or other fabric but not mesh). At a plant nursery, buy a small amount of blood meal (a fertilizer). Put some blood meal in each bag. Place a few on the ground and hang the others from nearby shrubs or low branches of trees. Squirt them with water just enough to wet the bags but not enough to make them soggy. Occasionally, wet the bags again.
Deer, rabbits, and squirrels will not go where they smell blood.
By the way, blood meal is a great fertilizer when making potting mix. It is high-nitrogen but mild. It will not burn roots.
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David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
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