Cordyline Australis not growing straight

Hi everyone,
I?ve just signed up as I?m struggling to find an answer to a problem I have with my Cordyline Australis. I have searched and can?t find anything similar, we planted our Australis 3 years ago to go with one that was already in the garden. It has done really well but the trunk is quite narrow and was getting blown over in the wind so it has been staked for the past 2 years but it has grown in an S shape.
It looks really healthy and is still growing really well, but I don?t know what to do about straightening it out ??
Thinking back, I?m not sure I dug a deep enough hole for it when I planted it
My photos are too big so I will resize them and post them.
Many Thanks Dave
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Fulhamboy70


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Fulhamboy70


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On Tue, 17 Oct 2017 13:44:52 +0100, Fulhamboy70

That's a very young specimen with a long way to grow... its trunk doesn't look at all oddly configured... I'd leave it alone. With plants don't look for perfection... an imperfect growth habit is more interesting, adds character... a perfect textbook configuration is what anyone can have and is boring. If all people were alike life would be extremely boring.
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Many thanks for the replies, we will leave it and see what happens
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Fulhamboy70


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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 17:39:13 +0100, Fulhamboy70

Looked like it's doing fine... make sure it recieves proper watering for your climate, and I'd pound in some fertilizing sticks around it.
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On 10/18/2017 3:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This from a HUD dwelling shut in. LOL
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On 17/10/17 12:51, Fulhamboy70 wrote:

I wouldn't try to straighten it out, particularly if it's growing well. Are all the plants shown here straight? <https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=%22cordyline+australis%22&lr=&hl=en-GB&as_qdr=all&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved hUKEwiWrInW8ffWAhVMLVAKHcPTDNsQiR4IuAI&biw58&bihV6>
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Jeff

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On 10/17/2017 4:51 AM, Fulhamboy70 wrote:

I am not sure about C. australis, but I have had excellent success rooting the cutoff top of a C. fruticosa. If you want to start over, this is something to try. As I recall, the trunk of my C. fruticosa developed a new shoot while the top was rooting.
I would not attempt to straighten it. Irregularities in trunks and -- for other trees -- branches increases the interesting aspect.
If you insist, however, I would tie a wooden stake to the trunk above, below, and at the bend. The stake should NOT be inserted into the ground. It should be tied quite tight, especially at the bend. You must then monitor the ties to make sure they do not girdle the trunk as it grows. At the bend, you will likely not be able to tie the trunk snug to the stake; there, you will have to gradually make the tie tighter over time (again avoiding girdling).
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David E. Ross
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On 10/17/2017 4:51 AM, Fulhamboy70 wrote: Hi everyone, I’ve just signed up as I’m struggling to find an answer to a problem I have with my Cordyline Australis. I have searched and can’t find anything similar, we planted our Australis 3 years ago to go with one that was already in the garden. It has done really well but the trunk is quite narrow and was getting blown over in the wind so it has been staked for the past 2 years but it has grown in an S shape. It looks really healthy and is still growing really well, but I don’t know what to do about straightening it out ?? Thinking back, I’m not sure I dug a deep enough hole for it when I planted it

If planted in the ground why would it blow over... saplinhgs tend to bend in the wind, not become uprooted... and bending in the wind encourages a stronger root system so staking is not a good idea.
Usually saplings will slowly straighten as they grow... also depends on the direction the sun strikes.. with sun stiking equally straightening occurs quicker. Often young saplings develop odd configurations in crowded plant nurseries from being shaded half the day, especially when saplings are potted, set half in shade, and moved only ocasionally... or blown over from wind and not set right for many weeks. Of course with some trees oddly shaped trunks are it's normal growing habit. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordyline_australis
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