Pointed Pumpkin Plants

I planted twelve varieties of pumpkins this year, all of which are doing well. Most of the varieties are similar in appearance but the Secretariat pumpkins have a significantly more pointed appearance than the rest.
The first link shows the normal leaves on the left and the Secretariat leaves on the right.
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This link shows the flowers, again with regular on the left and Secretariat on the right:
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Paul
Reply to
Pavel314
always interested in hearing about any that are edible, good and will stand up to squash borers and squash bugs.
good luck! :)
we have a small number of squash plants growing this season - it is going to be kinda strange to not have many this fall.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
I'm probably cursing myself by posting this, but we've been planting both summer and winter squash for years and had no problem with borers or bugs. Maybe they don't come as far north or east as Maryland.
Paul
Reply to
Pavel314
T wrote:
someone i know has been using ducks to get them. :)
i don't have any major issues with them at present but they are around and doing damage to the squash plant stems and vines.
i am not growing plants which always die when attacked so i just hope to keep growing these but i would like to have some other variety in what i grow.
one thing i have heard of is to grow the plants inside for a while first to let the stems get tough before planting them out.
i've also heard that wrapping in vet tape (but you have to keep an eye on things to make sure the tape isn't too tight) will help.
i still haven't sourced trombonico seeds but i hope to eventually.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
...
i hope not! since we are much further north than Maryland i'm pretty sure the cold is not the issue.
perhaps nobody else around there grows them?
we have fields of them around in various places (not close to us, but probably close enough).
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Further north? I thought you were in Texas. Must be confusing you with another poster here.
Probably nobody within a few miles. I noticed a big pumpkin field last fall on my way up to the trap range but that's about ten miles north of us. The big fields around here are corn or soybean, with a few cattle pastures.
Reply to
Pavel314
in Mid-Michigan.
most of the fields around us are either corn or soybeans too. once in a while someone will grow winter wheat or winter rye and a few others are sugar beet growers. as for livestock, not too many around here, but we do have some beefalo down the road a bit, some neighbors downwind of us have pigs, but we don't smell them too often - it could be a lot worse...
songbird
Reply to
songbird
In article Pavel314 writes:
I don't think that is the case. I certainly had my share of squash borers in northen Virginia in the late '80s.
It's been years since I planted anything that they target. I'm pleasantly surprised that they don't go after cucumber vines. I hope they ignore water melon as well, since I'm trying that this year.
Reply to
Drew Lawson
This has been a great year for cucumbers for us. We have too many to eat so we give the excess to the sheep. They enjoyed them for a while but now they're getting tired of them, too.
We had a similar situation about 40 years ago when I over-planted cucumbers; my daughter's pony ate the excess for a while but eventually wouldn't touch them.
Paul
Reply to
Pavel314
a few can be bitter.
i just put up another 12 quarts of dill pickles yesterday so the idea of "too many" doesn't happen until i get to around 100 quarts. :)
i will eat them all summer if they keep producing and we don't pull the plants. i can give quite a few away to my brother, he'll eat them too. i like them as a low calorie snack/filler and we make a lot of things with them (salads, quick pickles, sandwiches, etc.).
songbird
Reply to
songbird

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