Peat Pots

and Piss Poor Performance . I don't understand it , the same seed , soil , and growing conditions and the plastic cells far outdo the little strips of 8 peat pots . I like the concept , just slit it and bury it without disturbing the roots too much . But the whole thing doesn't work unless the seedlings actually grow . I planted 4 kinds of peppers in these , multiple seeds per cell because I know they're old and the germ rate is likely low - did the same with some other peppers and the tomatoes in the plastic cells . The peat pots had exactly 2 seeds germinate of probably 64 or more seeds . The plastic were over-run , and in fact all the seedlings now in peat were germinated in plastic . Even allowing for the stress of being moved , they just ain't gettin' it . They have nice color , look good , just aren't growing as fast . I'm wondering if I need some supplemental N or something - maybe a light shot of Miracle Grow , since it's high in N at 24/8/16 . I just don't know what to do at this point , but I'd like to save these seedlings . They're extras to me , but I planned to give them to a neighbor (the one with the rabbits) . He works for a living and doesn't have the time I do to devote to this stuff .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry Coombs wrote:

almost all seed starting materials should be pretty low in actual nutrients (to avoid fungal/rot issues) thus for those plants with smaller seeds you will need to supplement nutrients earlier to keep them going until they are planted out.
other than not having the space for doing starts i also figured out the costs involved and am happy with the local greenhouse doing them for us.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    I've never got satisfactory performance from peat or moss pots.and remove them completely from purchased plants. Been a long time since I bought-in plants, though. My favorite nursery containers are inexpensive ±2" terra cotta pots. The pots decay very slowly, if kept wet, but last for years with seasonal use and may easily be sterilized. Second fave is store-brand uncoated paper cups from the supermarket. The paper cups compost fairly quickly, if kept wet, but mine go into the regular compost place and not directly into the garden.
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03/15/2018 08:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Same here. When I turn over my ground pots every spring, the peat pot is still in tact.
Sometimes the root grow out the bottom of the peat pots, so I delicately try to rip the bottoms out before planting and I "seem" to get good results. The rest of the pot stays in tact.
There are some pots out there made up of Cow Skat and those I have never had an issue with. I believe Bonnie uses them.
Cow poop! Now 1001 uses for it!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/16/2018 4:53 PM, T wrote:

  I watered lightly with a weak Miracle Grow solution , just the stuff in peat . We'll see what happens .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/16/2018 5:15 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

My husband has set up an aquaponics systems in our spare room, and he's growing all sorts of veggies with it. He is going to move most of the outside and grow the veggies in a bucket with water! Some of his plants he decided to grow in pots, though. He uses those peat pots with some potting perlite/vermiculite to grow some miniature tomato plants inside, and he also has onions, cilantro, and a couple other herbs he is growing in water, too. One thing he is growing that is doing great is celery! He can grow that indoors all year round if he wants to.
Some of those mini tomatoes are already blooming and they don't get taller than 12-18 inches, so he never had to even plant them in dirt or put them outside in buckets with water. It's mostly an experiment, but it's turning out fairly well, so far.
Our raised bed garden outside is in need of repairs, so I had to completely disassemble one 4'x 8' raised bed, remove all the screws and nails and stack the wood. Then I shoved out all of the dirt and put it into 2 other nearby beds so we can rebuild the broken beds. We've got part of the old bed next to it shored up and we're going to marry the new beds to the remaining old beds. We both ran out of gas yesterday right about the time we got our first spring rainfall. Today, it turned cold again, so we won't get back out there again until it warms up a little bit more.
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/19/2018 5:03 PM, Muggles wrote:

I've got about a third of the garden left to amend and till . I have time though , I won't be setting anything out for around a month . Strawberries are doing OK , all but 2 (of 29) are showing new growth . I must be doing something right , we had some very heavy rain last night and there was no erosion out in the garden . Apparently all that decomposing straw I've been tilling in has helped ...
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/19/2018 5:41 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

This is off the veggie topic, but I planted some tulip and daffodil bulbs last fall and I have blooms, now! I'm so excited. LOL
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/20/2018 10:21 PM, Muggles wrote:

  We've had daffodils blooming for a couple of weeks now , we have a variety of white/yellow/orange blossoms  . The tulips I planted came up the next spring , bloomed , and disappeared . Never did figger it out for sure but I suspect rodents ate 'em .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, March 15, 2018 at 9:06:26 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

I was having the same trouble my last season of growing starts & asked an o ldtimer at the garden shop about it. He told me there is something in the p eat that inhibits pepper germination. I restarted with my own compost and g arden soil with seeds from the same batch. This time I had nearly 100% germ ination. I would never use peat in a seed starting mix again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/30/2018 7:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

  And I won't either ... I'm awaiting delivery (at our local co-op) of some Anaheim seedlings , I have wanted to grow these for several years with lousy results - last year I finally got some to germinate , but they did poorly in the garden . This year I got soil tests and am amending the soil as needed . So far the results have been good , what I have planted so far is all doing well .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Count me among those old timers who find peat not to be a suitable soil additive. I start seeds in unwaxed paper cups or, increasingly, in 2" terra cotta pots. The soil come directly from the garden beds. The soil mix in the various containers is very nearly the same as in the beds. Only a few of the container plants get something akin to miracle gro and those plants are not for eating.
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/30/2018 1:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

  I do use potting soil , it's more convenient plus until recently the garden soil has been lacking . Might still be , but I'm taking steps to improve it . Just today I planted 180 cells in (foam) egg cartons with assorted flowers . I'm hoping to establish self-renewing/perennial patches of flowers that will have flowers all summer for the bees . From about mid-June on there's actually very little for them to forage on here .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm a fan of bee-balm, in various colors (red will also make happy hummingbirds, but the bees will get theirs as well) among others. And don't overlook clover and alfalfa (but if your soil tends to acid, alfalfa can be difficult, or at least require a lot of lime to be happy.)
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by
Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/31/2018 1:13 PM, Ecnerwal wrote:

Our soil here is acid , had to lime the north end of the garden this year . Bee Balm is one of the flowers I've planted , also penstemon , 2 kinds of poppies , liatris , lavender , alyssum , and borage . Marigolds too , but I don't think the bees are attracted to them . *I* think they're pretty . I did a lot of research to find plants that have both extended bloom times and that attract bees and hummers - and that will grow in this area . I've sown all of these outdoors with no discernible effect - either they didn't come up , something ate the seeds , or ate the tender new shoots .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 31 Mar 2018 14:13:52 -0400, Ecnerwal

Birdsfoot trefoil, however will thrive on acid soil.
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.