Green beans?

Hi All,
Are green beans very difficult to grow? (Keep in
mind my black thumb.)
Found these with a 50 day maturity:
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No strings either.
And my trophy wife loves the way I cook green beans:
bacon fat, garlic, onions, oregano, cut green beans
Many thanks,
-T
Reply to
T
T wrote:
er, well, some can be and others aren't as much but it is going to depend upon your climate and soil.
here i have certain varieties that have done well over the years and others that struggle (planted right next to each other in the same soil so they are treated the same in terms of climate and watering).
the hard part there is going to be how to get 50-60 days before it gets really hot out as i think then the plants may have a hard time setting pods and keeping them - but perhaps this variety will hold up longer. dunno until you try. :)
wish they had pictures of the seeds.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Oh, are the sprouts large or tiny. My earwigs eat the tiny ones but leave zucchini sprout alone
Reply to
T
T wrote: ...
sprouts are about 3mm across, start them in 1 gallon containers early and plant them out when the weather gets warm enough and you can get a jump start on the season.
ear wig traps can thin out the population.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
3 mm will keep the little bugger away!
Thank you!
Oh, does the term "bush beans" mean to trellises?
Reply to
T
T wrote: ...
no support should be needed at first but as the plants get bigger they can fall over if they have a lot of beans on them and the wind/rain is strong enough or as they get older and begin to die off then the roots will not support the plant any more and it can fall over.
since you aren't interested in much of a dry bean harvest pick off the beans before they get too old and eat them. a few pods can be left to get seeds to full size and then you can remove those for seed saving for the next year(s) plantings.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Well,no; at least down here, in this soil and climate, they aren't. In fact, one might say they're snap-bean easy. By many folks across the U.S South green beans, consumed pods-and-all, are called "snap beans": So named because of the sound made when the pods are broken to length. Useless trivia: "Zydeco" means "snap bean" and refers to the ease with which the musical style may be played or enjoyed, so I've been told by one who'd know.
I can't address maturation times because I live where we easily have time for two crops in a calendar year (planted in Sept.?Oct. and Feb.?Apr.) At the times of both spring and fall planting, enough mild days remain to ensure good results.
That's what they all say.... Just wait long enough and let them mature fully. I can't make any specific recommendations about soil amendments or fertilizer. My standard procedure is to mix in loads of home-brew compost along with loads of store-bought alfalfa pellets and it works. Just as other legumes, green beans are nitrogen "fixers" which simply means that?with a little help from some friends?beans can take atmospheric nitrogen (N2) from the air and convert it to ammonium (N4), a form useful to the plant. Some legumes can be induced to support more of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria than needed, allowing some of them and of the nitrogen to remain in the soil. There's more to it than I've stated but the process isn't complex or expensive. I can't vouch for Burpee seeds,either, but they sure have been around for a while. As rule, I save seeds but when necessary I buy seeds online from one of several sources tha offer so-called "sustainably" grown and/or organic seeds. Saving seeds is not always a good idea because there's a risk of transmitting infections to successive generations. It sometimes seems that everything that has a mouth likes bean plants. Down here, major culprits are cutworms, grasshoppersand "root knot" nematodes. Each of those may be controlled with "naturral" pesticides.
um-m-m-m....
Reply to
derald
...
some of the more modern beans have had this trait largely reduced or eliminated as i'm finding in my own growing of many varieties. some do not have many or any nodules at all on the roots and others have plenty.
...
some of the bean plants here have been chewed off by cutworms this season when i started out and i replanted those. i could not find the culprit but i did get enough plants to sprout to get some seeds back which is why i was growing those particular plants.
what was interesting to me this season was that the north garden (which doesn't have a fence around it) did pretty well even if some of the bean plants were chewed off by deer, rabbits or groundhogs.
the other day i weighed just one type of bean i grew and it totaled over 23lbs with 12lbs coming from that one garden (i don't keep track of how many beans i pick fresh from the gardens so we did pick and eat some fresh beans and also several pounds of shellies). for a very small bean that is a large number of seeds. they're good eating so we'll keep growing them as they're more reliable than the pinto beans i've grown in the past.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
My worst is earwigs! I am constantly killing as many as I can and they still eat everything in sight.
Found a hot pepper last week with an earwig inside. Ruined the thing. And I could not find how he got inside!
Reply to
T
I don't pay much attention to the beans. They always seem to do well and have good color. I typically grow bush types of Delinel, provider, or slenderette, a so-called "filet" bean that produces relatively small seeds and lends itself well to julienne slicing, not my favorite way to prepare green beans but I don't live alone ).
I reduce and nearly eliminate root not by introducing a cannibalistic variey of nematode which does an outstanding job or eating the root knot ones before they can colonize the roots enough to damage the plants. Trouble is, that when they run of food, they die or move.
When I start seeing cutworm damage, I try to find them and skoosh'em, too, but the hunt is not always successful. For insurance, I usually spray the plants with Bt. I know the cutworms must eat it for it to have any effect but I figure the loss of another bean seedling or two is a small price to pay. I'm able to keep the grasshoppers subdued for several generations with "nolo". Although it's most effectve when used pre-emergence, I generally wait until adults become a problem, to reduce the chances of inducing immunity. Adult hoppers are so highky mobile, they're almost impossible to control.
Reply to
derald
Earwigs aren't a problem down here. Not in my garden, at least. I occasionnaly see individuals but none in great numbers. Having said that, it seems tha sweet potatoe
Reply to
derald
darned if I know what happened. You see, I have a left hand that has a will but no mind of its own.... Continuing: it seems that sweet potatoes are among their favorites because every time I try to grow them the tubers end up with distinct channels on their surfaces that appear to have been left by some creature randomly munching its way across.
Reply to
derald

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