Yet ANOTHER use for WD40

Page 1 of 2  
I spray it on electrical contacts and other electrical components to displace water and prevent corrosion. It works great for that! I learned the trick way back when I worked as a technician in an underground missile silo.
TES
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've always understood you are to use ED-80 on electricals, rather than WD-40.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Izzat "electron displacer" v. "water displacer", son?
-- Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing. -- Abraham Lincoln
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would be concerned that the chemicals so deposited could CREATE problems with electrical circuitry, especially when there is any contact arcing. Is the resistance of the dry material infinite? What might the voltage limits be? Maybe okay for 12 volts automotive systems, but not for 480 volt power distribution? I remember using Freon TF and Freon TMC for cleaning high voltage (20KV circuit components before potting them. Choosing the right cleaner was a real big deal.
Pete Stanaitis ----------------

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WD-40 my be OK for a manually operate contact but not for an electrically operated contact. We had a guy try it on a bank of relays and the whole thing seized to halt! The stuff evaporates and leaves a sticky mess,not to mention where any arcing has occurred the result is pile of sticky carbon and a flash that burns the contacts beyond usable.
DO NOT USE WD-40 ON CONTACTS! keeps it use to hinges and things where you don`t mind having to reapply every 2-3months for the rest of your life.
A few mechanics have witnessed signs inside the hoods of`vehicles ``USE OF WD-40 ON THIS ENGINE WILL RESULT AND NOT PAYING THE BILL OR LITIGATION FOR DAMAGES``
----------------------
"Pete S" wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2011 8:48 AM, m II wrote:

I suspect dam few to none. Having retired from the automotive industry and having been the service manager for an automobile dealership I can honestly say that I have never ever witnessed or heard of a sign, sticker, label or what ever indicating not to use WD-40 "under" the hood. We used cases of WD-40 in the shop, and under the hood.
WD-40, Water Displacement- formula # 40 is a piss poor permanent lubricant. It works great for helping to loosen rusted nuts, bolts, and frozen assemblies but the lubricating qualities are very short lived. AND of course to displace moisture. Lithium grease is a much better choice for a long term lubrication of hinges.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

None taken at all Leon. I do question the use of "we" though. Is not that either "poor Engrish" (you do know what is "Engrish", right?) or a presumption of the consumption by others??
Try this perspective on for size, Leon. I am bringing the World to your desktop. How's that? You have heard of the Internet? Ok.. I explain briefly. It is that place outside of the USA Intranet. The thing Al Gore invented and sold to you guys. Y'all bought a lemon, by the way. But at least it gave you guys access to the Internet<G>
[seriously] Mate.. iff'n I had a buck for each "lingo lame" I have and do attract I could mount a takeover bid on Microsoft, no worries. Such trivia does not faze me one iota. An the fact that I explain this to *you* says you are on my "favorites list". Others are still wondering where their post went!         /lmao
I aint changing a thing, Leon I am what I am, just as many are here to me I deal with the "strange ones" as I will. I follow the rules of Usenet, I subscribe to the Usenet ethos and I promote "free speech", where I do post. More than that is up to the reader, not I. Some help? http://www.dogpile.com covers more Search Engines than Google and does not "hand feed" only American "stuff".
A quick scan of this site will tell you I am being very clear in *my* use of English.. for an Aussie poster:-> http://www.sunburntcountry.au.com/sayings/fulllist.html
All that said.. I have little to none trouble in figuring what you guys and the Kanucks are saying yet the reverse is always a problem for a great many from the Americas.. and not only with reading of Aussie "stuff", I would add.
cheers george
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure you did. Urban legend. Something you heard from a friend of a friend.

Garbage. It does nothing of the kind.

That, of course, is the entirely *normal* result of an electrical arc *without* WD-40.

If by "a few" you mean "zero" then this is probably true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CALL THE SCIENTIFIC MINDS OF THE WORLD!
George can make carbon out of copper and silver contact material by passes an electrical current through them!! Many manufactures will want to hear about this atomic chemistry miracle!
Duh! -------------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message That, of course, is the entirely *normal* result of an electrical arc *without* WD-40.
------------------------- not to mention where any arcing has occurred the result is pile of sticky carbon and a flash that burns the contacts beyond usable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Jul 2011 14:09:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@example.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

with grease, CAN remove the oil from the grease, leaving behind the "soap" (sodium stearate in some cases, lithium in others, plus a host of others)- which will cause mechanisms to stick.
As for electrical contacts - on sliding contacts like many automotive switches, and at low voltage and current, not likely to cause much problem - but any arcing in a switch with "oily" contacts WILL cause carbon build-up - which CAN cause high resistance, heating, and burning of contacts. High voltage and high current contacts must be CLEAN or lubricated/protected by an inert grease (dialectric grease) that will not burn and protects against corrosion.
Spray WD-40 (aerosol) has (or at least had) a flammable propellant, which, if used on an arcing contact - or in proximity to an arcing contact, CAN ignite - with rather spectacular result if, say, inside a distributor cap.
There are NO manufacturers that plackard their under-hood areas with prohibition against using WD40 under the hood. It is EXCELLENT for drying out damp ignition wires - even though there are better products, which help seal the wires against moisture for a longer time - but NEVER use "ignition sealer" - the plasticy coating if compromised at all, just traps moisture in the wire, making it worse - and impossible to dry out with WD-40 or anything else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Absolutely right.
--
Stuart Winsor

Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    /snort
... both of you are well off the "intent of use" of the product. why does THAT not surprise me :-/
I'll play. WD40 can be used to start a reluctant oil fired engine - any refined version of (oil). george
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2011 8:35 AM, Pete S wrote:

Actually WD-40 worked great in old automotive distributor caps to displace condensation, 20,000-40,000 volts and plenty of arcing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

cause carbon build-up on the electrodes - which is blasted off by the next couple of "lightning strikes" - and is not a problem since the "electrodes" are not "contacts" - i.e. - they NEVER touch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wd40
Sheesh guys.
WD40 was invented to displace water and prevent corrosion of electrical contacts. It has no to none lubricitive properties.
-TES
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/11 9:27 AM, Zz Yzx wrote:

Did you even read your own link? :-)
"The long-term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture."
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You missed out "Atracting dust and dirt which sticks to it causing many other problems"
--
Stuart Winsor

Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OF COURSE they want to sell that attribute. But ask an engineer if they'd use WD40 as a lubricant.
Next, you'll be telling me that Pepto-Bismal has no bismuth, and that Kaopectate has no kayolinite or pectin (it used to, but no more; actually, now Kaopectate IS Pepto-Bismal).
Jes- sayin' .....
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zz Yzx wrote the following:

http://www.wd40.com/uses-tips/function/other-uses /
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.