Yellow glue or ??? for Adirondack chair?

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My wife has an Adirondack chair her son made for her. It's been sitting in the back yard for years. I tried to get her to let me paint it or at least seal it, but she wanted it to weather.
Well, not it's broken. A clumbsy relative fell on it and broke one of the arms. It's a very clean break. I want to glue it back together for whatever life it has left.
Is yellow glue as good as it gets for this or it there something better? It's made of redwood.
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Yellow glue will work for a while. You would be better off with a clear epoxy glue.
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wrote:

Any particular variety or brand? 1-minute? 5-minute? 1 ton? 5 ton? Is there one that's better for wood.
I've worked with yellow glue for a long time and have a feel for how to use it. I always seem to have a few problems with epoxy -- and I seem to always get it all over myself. It's like those plastic peanuts that literally fly out of the box and arrange themselves all over me. Still, not as bad as crazy glue, which I am convinced is named for the users, not the glue itself.
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If you can really select anything on the planet then you couldn't do better than System Three brand T-88 epoxy. This is what I use on my Adirondack chairs in construction and I don't think you could find anything better for a repair either... or you could show your love you really care for her and buy a new chair from me ;^) www.sonomaproducts.com. End of season sale!

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On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 17:12:17 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

Livermore? Well, shucks, you're just up the road a piece. 'course, right now, you're a mite hard to get to with the Bay Bridge shut down. ;-) Maybe we'll stop on by and take a gander.
I called around and no one carries T-88. What about Gorilla Glue?
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The problem with "good epoxy" is that it doesn't come in mini usage packaging. There are a number of brands ... West System, Cold Cure, System Three, East System , MAS....
I agree that you should not use the 5 minute syringe" type.
Given your admissions, If you are near any Marinas or boat repair / boat builder - they work with epoxy all the time, and might be worth the call, or wait until the bridge is back in operation and have Sonomaproducts look at it.
wrote:

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IIRC "the bridge" was back in action for rush hour traffic this morning. At least the news indicated that.
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Gorilla glue has some great advertising and a catchy name but every real test I have seen ALWAYS puts it at the bottom of the list in every category. Poly glues are probably OK and better than yellow glue for this application. I would say it depends on the break. Glue might not be the best answer in any case, it might need a splint or to scab in a piece, etc.

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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:
----------------------------------------------- Gorilla glue has some great advertising and a catchy name but every real test I have seen ALWAYS puts it at the bottom of the list in every category. -------------------------------------------------
Very much over priced and under peckered IMHO.
Lew
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It's funny... I have to agree - Gorilla Glue is awful stuff. Everytime I've used it, I've been disapointed. However, Gorilla Tape - now that stuff is incredible. Never found anything close. Wonder why they suck at making glue, but excel with tape?

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Prof Wonmug wrote:

Awful! Use epoxy, any epoxy.
--

dadiOH
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 17:12:17 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

OK. The T-88 just arrived. I couldn't find it in anuy local stores, so I ordered it online.
A couple of questions:
The wood is very VERY dry. It was never finished or sealed in any way. It's been sitting in the sun for 4-5 years. The entire chair weighs next to nothing.
Should I dampen the surfaces before applying t6he T-88?
If so, how much and how long beforehand?
Any other preparation? The surfaces are clean and (very) dry.
I was planning on using a cheap brush to apply the epoxy. Any better suggestions?
Thanks
PS: The bottle says to wear rubber gloves. Is that necessary for one little patch?
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Prof Wonmug wrote:

A very good epoxy, and probably well suited to this job because it's a bit thicker than some and won't soak into the wood like water. It also cures in a reasonable amount of time.

NO. This is epoxy, not polyurethane glue.

You mean like sanding or the like? You could, but I doubt it would make a lot of difference. I would brush an initial coat on both surfaces and let it soak in for a while (10 minutes or so; if memory serves, T-88 takes a good half hour or more to start getting thick), and brush on more if the wood drinks it up; you don't want the mating surfaces starved of glue. I still think the Titebond III would have been the easier choice, but I think you'll be fine.

Nope, that'll do it.

Your call; I probably wouldn't. As I recall, the cleanup solvent for this epoxy is white vinegar, so I would have some of that handy.
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 22:42:44 -0500, Steve Turner

I thought I read somewhere that dampening the surfaces a bit will keep very dry wood from soaking up too much of the glue (expoy) leaving a starved joint.

I think sanding would make things worse. It was a clean break along the grain. The arm received a shearing force and the wood split lengthwise. I am planning on fitting the pieces together. I already tested it without any glue and they fit almost perfectly.

The instructions say to let it sit for 30 minutes on wood. If there are any dry spots, apply more.

I heard you, but I've used Titebond before, so this was a chance to get some experience with a high-end epoxy. I've only used the quick-set epoxies before.

Yes, it says to use white vinegar.
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"Prof Wonmug" wrote:

Get a small can of denatured alcohol at the hardware store.
On the way home stop at Harbor Freight and get a box of latex surgical gloves (About $5/box of 50 pairs) and depending on how big the patch is some plumber's acid brushes and/or some 2" chip brushes.
Total cost, less than $10 with tax.
You will also want some throw away cups.
Mix up some epoxy, delute it about 5% with the alcohol and apply it to the wood allowing it to soak into the wood.
Apply 2-3 coats as needed.
Wait about 2-4 hours, mix up some more epoxy and apply it to the wood over the previous thinned epoxy.
Throw cups, brushes, gloves, etc in the trash, get a beer, and brag about your accomplishments.
BTW, wear OLD shirt, no matter how careful you are, you will probably get some on the shirt.
(Guys who regularly use epoxy buy a lot of clothes from the Salvation Army store)
If you get any epoxy on your bare skin, strip down and get into the shower as quickly as possible.
If you ever get sensitized to epoxy, you will wish you hadn't.
Have fun.
Lew
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 22:14:03 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Is that 1 oart alcohol to 19 parts epoxy? In other words, just a small amount of alcohol?

To both sides, right?
How long between coats?

I should be so lucky as to only get it on my shirt.

Is this stuff more "toxic" than the 5-minute epoxies? I've used them many times, typically get a fair amount on my hands, and never had a reaction.

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I get a bit on me now and then but do usually wear gloves. The instructions are pretty clear they don't want you getting it on your skin so I assume it has some level of toxicity. If you have some gloves available, I would use them.
I usually mix up some in a dixie cup or bowl. I let it thicken for 10 minutes or so then slather it on pretty thick. I usually use a trimmed flux brush but I am doing little areas. I don't think you can go wrong with this stuff. Doing a pre-glue or "sizing" as some suggest is probably a great idea if you are gluing any end grain, good for yellow glue also, but I wouldn't think it is necessary on face gluing no matter how dry. This stuff is thick.

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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 23:17:42 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

Well, the job is done. Overall, I think I did about an average job.
There was one small end-grain joint. The pre-gluing was probably a good idea there. It soaked up the glue very quickly. Unfortunately, there was no way to clamp that joint, so I just tapped it with a hammer to get the old screw to seat and placed a couple of bricks to hold it down. Apparently, when I clamped the other end, I must have torqued the whole chair. Today, I discovered that it had dried with a gap of about .3". Even so, it's solid. I guess with the pre-gluing, there was enough there to span that gao in several places and this is a structural epoxy.
The other end where is split lengthwise is very solid. It's a bit discolored where I tried to wipe off the excess. I think the pre-gluing resulting is there being too much glue in the joint. I only clamped to touch, but quite a bit squirted out.
Anyway, thanks for the help. I think that is not the strongest part of the chair.
As I was working on the break, I noticed that the whole chair is wobbly. It was put together with screws and plugs, but no glue. Now the wood has dried out and pulled away from the screws. What would you say to me injecting some epoxy into the loose joints?
One big plus -- no epoxy on me or my clothes. That's a first.
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"Prof Wonmug" wrote:

Just a smell.
I just eyeball it, it's not critical, anything from 4%-6%.
Know the old joke about a dry martini?
How much vermouth in a dry martini?
Stand on the other side of the room and spell "vermouth" quietly<G>.

Absolutely.
5 minutes maybe, you are simply trying to get the epoxy to penetrate the and seal the wood and establish a base for the final coat.
Didn't understand this was a chair arm repair when I made previous post.
With that info, I would wait maybe 15 minutes after last coat of thinned epoxy, the apply finish coat and clamp pieces only enough to hold pieces in position.

Old clothes RULE.

NO but being exposed to epoxy is cumulative.
One day you wake up and are sensitized.
BTW, wrap your clamp pads with some waxed paper or plastic so the pads so they won't leave any marks on the wood.
Have fun.
Lew
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 23:30:50 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Yep, that's what the instructions say. Do not clamp too hard.

I didn't know that. Thanks. I'll get some gloves.

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