Wow! How sharp is that blade?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3Ad6tBdLbM

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They could use those shavings for the hardwood ply at the BORG.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/10/2013 11:15 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Yeah! but only after punching some voids in the veneer. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/10/2013 11:15 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Love it .... Long live Ninja planing!! LOL
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/10/2013 10:15 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

LOL +1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

For those of who don't plane shavingsthat thin, 10 microns is about 4 ten-thousandth's of an inch.Less than half of .001". I just checkedwith my micrometer, and a thick sheet of paper from my copy machine is .006. So the sheet of paper would be about 15 times as thick as the shaving.
They didn't mention the woodthey were shaving, but Iwould guess that it's very soft, like Lime or Basswood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That must be how they make toilet paper for public restrooms. Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Impressive. If you showed me those shavings I'd have guessed some kind of microtome set at around 30 degree blade angle. Those guys are freehanding at close to 45 degrees.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We Wreckers call those "one-sided shavings". (We have to sweep them off the ceiling as all one-sided shavings float.)
This happens when we ScarySharp(tm) the blade so well, we have to move them slowly through the air so we don't split atoms with 'em. (So said Paddy O'Deen '96)
--
In an industrial society which confuses work and productivity, the
necessity of producing has always been an enemy of the desire to create.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

at

Without skewing the plane at the usual 15 or so degrees.
0.001" = ~25.4 microns. I regularly mike them down to 1 mil. Any lighter set, and the iron doesn't want to bite. They're obviously using very nice steel. And paying for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Feb 2013 14:05:19 -0800 (PST), Father Haskell

They benefit from using hand forged steel. The hammering takes the relatively large carbides in the steel and mashes them into even smaller carbides.
I find with my O-1 or A2 steel planes and chisels that honing finer than an 8000 grit waterstone doesn't help. But with hand forged steel, then you can hone with even finer stones and the blade will actually get sharper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.