Workshop temperature ?

Page 1 of 3  
What temperature is your workshop at ? I know some of you live in the great white North of Leftpondia. How cold does it have to get in your working space (not outdoors) before you give up and go indoors ?
I gave up on some profile bandsawing today - it was just too cold to hold my fingers on the iron bandsaw table and accuracy was suffering.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 00:54:53 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

Despite being not too far from the coldest (record: Snag YT, -81F, 3/2/1947) part of the Great White North of Leftpondia (Kanuckistan, Silvan), it's never too cold to be in the shop. Note the numerous discussions on the merits of various means of heating the shop we Leftpondians constantly engage in.
So the answer is: the shop & tools are cold when you start, but gradually warm up. 7-8C and above is quite confortable. But then, as we like to say, it's a dry cold. Remember, it's not the cold, it's the humidity.
The coldest I've ever seen the shop was -20C when it was -47C outside.

You need (1) insulated coveralls (the LOML got me new ones for Christmas) (2) a tuque and (3) gloves (either wool & thinsulate with open fingers and a mitten cover or thin fleece (e.g <http://www.patagonia.com/za/PDC?OPTION=PRODUCT&merchant_rns85&skuG831&ws úlse>). The coveralls and tuque keep your body core and head warm and make it easier for your body to send warm blood out to your fingers. You should remove the gloves when working close to a rapidly whirling sharp object, but bandsaws are OK.
I find it OK to work with power tools down to about -5C, but usually it's not for very long as the shop is warming up. After an hour or two, I ditch the coveralls.
--
Luigi
Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Generally over 58 degrees. I'm in CALLY-FORN-YAH. Below 50; I'm freezin', man! :)
Dave
Andy Dingley wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
same here... I have the thermometer that we took from our RV.. has temp in garage and out on patio.. Last night (after raining) was 60 in garage and 56 outside... Anything under 48 or so just requires too many layers of clothes to be comfortable or having to close the garage door, (usually covered by sheet plastic sliding on rods), which I find claustrophobic..

mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it is down to 30 outside, I can heat up to 65 with ease. If it is much lower, I can only hit about 50. That is close to my minimum except for brief periods. If you want to do quality work, you need reasonable comfort. I do very little in January and February unless we get a warm spell, like tonight. I planed some wood tonight to see if it is work reclaiming. It was and now I'll bring home the rest.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Varies between approx 68 F in the winter and 72 F in the summer. 'Course, my shop is in the basement of my house. :-)
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't have a thermometer in my basement workshop. I do have a furnace with a vent on the side in case it gets too cold, otherwise the vent stays closed. In the winter I generally will have to wear a sweatshirt down there. In the summer it gets damp (humid), so I'm running a dehumidifyer and it's comfortable with just my teeshirt.
Joe
Andy Dingley wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

It depends on what I'm doing, really. I have worked down to 40 F for brief periods, but I like it to be at least 50 F if I'm going to be spending any time out there at all. I have a small shop, and one little ceramic cube has proven sufficient to get the temperature up to at least 45 F even though it's only 10 F outside, and I can work at 45 F, barely.
Multiply everything by 9/13 times the cubed root of pork tenderloin or whatever to convert to the degrees you and everyone else in the world use.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:36:51 -0500, Silvan

So wimping out at 40F (4°C) wasn't too bad then
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think so.. especially if you estimate what temperature the bare metal saw table might have been.. It's just not safe to work with power tools when your hands are that cold..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mac davis wrote:

The metal isn't any colder, it's just that heat transfer is much better so it "feels" colder...
But I agree on the safety aspect. And, of course, there are no wood glues I'm aware of that are below upper 40s for chalk temperatures so there's a limit on what you can do anyway...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

For me, there are technical issues and there are safety issues. If I find myself having to 'think through' processes that should be second nature, it's time to sweep up, and go inside.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Once it hits 280.3722222 kelvin I go inside. I have about 3 more weeks, according to Phil, before I can get anything done. I work in a detached garage with no heat source
http://www.onlineconversion.com/temperature.htm
--

Too much is not enough!
rvojtash NOT THIS at comcast (dot) net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm in New Jersey. It's about 44 when I go in, about 58 after about 6 minutes. I've got a nice 100,000 btu Modine shop heater that hangs from my ceiling :) If I start a project I keep it at least 50 when I'm not in there until everything is glued.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

So, why'd you rule out the outside workers? Low snow and 30-40 is just fine. I expect the guys up north think anything on the + side is OK.
Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
reply-to doesn't work
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't need my fingertips when I'm working outside.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I feel I need my fingertips, therefore the tolerance for cold depends on the task at hand. I can stuff boards through a planer at 0C, but I'd never try scroll work at that temperature. If it distracts me at all, it's too cold, and as Scarlet observed "tomorrow is another day."
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've been able to finally cut some wood in my shop, but it's un-insulated and un-heated. So long as it's above freezing, it's not too bad. Can't wait for spring, though!
Clint

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
my problem is on the other side. I can heat my attached garag..... er....... shop fine. Though when it hits zero outside, I dial back, to save on the electric bill.
But I hate working out there in the Summer. I can not air condition it easily.
-Dan V.
On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 00:54:53 +0000, Andy Dingley

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Valleskey <valleskey at comcast dot net> wrote:

Yeah, you said it. I know I already said it too, but I'm saying it again. It's nothing for it to get hotter than 120 F out there in the *spring*.
I really need some windows or something. My fan just ain't cuttin' it, but A/C is definitely not in the cards. Not enough power, and not enough room in the panel for any new breakers, which also eliminates the possibility of doing a subpanel. It would cost me a flat out fortune to put A/C in my shop, and it's not worth it.
The only way I could justify it is to make some money at this stuff, but when people want $187 worth of wood and $1 worth of glue and $30 worth of hardware and 100 hours of labor for $100....
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.