Workbench Design (revised) w/SketchUp

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If you are possibly curious in the present state of my workbench design, an abridged version of Garrett Hack's work, or would care see what a beginner can do with SketchUp, my pdf file is at the following web site:
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Note: Mr. Hack used wedged tenons (2!) at each joint between a trestle shoe and a trestle post. Me, it's all I can do to keep up with his terminology! The tenons are not visible from the viewpoint provided (nor are the trestle tops, nor the breadboard ends...). Final dimensions, in particular the height, are also not decided (sounds like I haven't done a darn thing!).
One lingering question I have been thinking about is how to cut the (traditional) shape:
_________________________ // \\
under each trestle shoe (basically a fourbyfour). Is using a mortise attachment on a delta drill press a good way to perform this? -- I don't have either one yet but it appears that I would get a lot of mileage out of it on this project! I've been looking at the Delta (floor) DP. A router table is not available. BTW, due credit to Lew for getting me going on this project, and to Swingman and Leon for their help with SketchUp, or to everyone who taught me so much about electricity, and everyone else who puts up with my posts ! Man--I forgot to wire this bench!!! : ) Having fun...
Bill
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How about taking out the corners with a hole saw or forstner bit and finishing with a bandsaw? Do the whole thing with a bandsaw? Drill one hole and finish the rest with a hand held frame saw?
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On 4/18/2010 2:15 AM, Bill wrote:

Nicely done, Bill ... amazing how doing a model or shop drawing, with any software, or paper and pencil, really gets you focused on how to accomplish all the little details that aren't obvious at first glance.
With regard to the shape of the 4 x 4 feet, and with use of power tools, this is definitely a job for a band saw and router, with jig/template.
Here's how I do the feet for trestle tables/benches:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/Trestle%20Table3.jpg
It will be hard, if not impossible, to find a router bit/end mill with the depth-of-cut to do the 4 x 4 foot in one pass, but if you do your template carefully (with line-up marks on both pieces), you can use the same jig on each side, rough cutting the shape first on the band saw.
With regard to the joinery, a router for your mortises, and "loose tenon" joinery, if done properly, will work just fine.
Some folks find drill press mortise attachments work just fine. I've found early on that they can be problematic in harder woods, YMMV. If you're going to do much mortise and tenon joinery, either learn to cut them by hand, or get a dedicated hollow chisel mortiser ... one can be had for under $300.
Spend some money on a band saw first if you don't already own one; and, of course, a router, and arsenal of bits, is simply indispensable for this kind of work.
A plunge router, with a jig/template for the specific job, can do the work of many tools.
AAMOF, you may find that you get a bigger kick out of devising and building a jig to do something that would be impossible without, than doing the actual project. :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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"Swingman" wrote:

----------------------------------- Major difference to workbench sketch.
Swing has built a 4 point footing, not a pair of continuous straight line footings.
4 point is stable, doubt pair of lined ever will be.
Lew
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On 4/18/2010 11:36 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Irrelevant to the _method_ of cutting his "shoe" profile, which was the point of my post, and including a picture as an idea of how to accomplish executing that profile with a router and jig.
He will get repeatable results using the method in the photograph that he won't get any other way.
"Stability" is left to the designer.
--
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"Swingman" wrote:

-----------------------------------------
A method I posted a couple of weeks ago when Bill's sketch first got posted.
Makes nice shoe shape, just not stable.
Lew
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Oh. So, Lew, you are of the opinion that there is still too much lateral support there on the feet. How large do the feet (on a 4by4 need to be so that there is no concern about them breaking, 2 inches?
I saved your post about the method, but lacking a router table, I temporarily set it aside. Maybe clamping (to a door laying accross two cabinets) will be sufficient?
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

------------------------------------------------ You could make each "pad" square (3-1/2 x 3-1/2) and solve the problem while looking good in the shower.
--------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------- Use a 3' x 3' x 3/4" piece of MDF with a hole in the middle laid across those cabinets or some saw horses and you have a router table.
Lew
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Yep, that sounds right!
Bill
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The last time I played with chemically-latent plywood I made myself pretty darn sick. Ditto on melamine. Haven't tried "Formaldehyde-free" plywood yet--but my local Home Depot stocks it...
Thank you, Bill
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Thank you--picture is worth 1000 words! Can I do that safely without a router table? Previous home owner left me a fairly sturdy hollow door resting accross two kitchen cabinets. I could clamp it to that. I also have a "Workmate" someone discarded, but that's probably not nearly heavy enough.
The DeWalt router 2.25 HP router "kit" (DW618PK) has been on my wish list for a while. Amazon raised their price by about 10% in January (grrrr).
I bought a Delta 14" BS in January--still in the box (it's cold in Indiana in January). I picked up a 1/2" blade to help rip the SYP for the workbench top. I collected 15 Jorgensen 3/4" pipe clamps and 15 pieces of 4' black pipe nibs and 15 couplets to protect the threads on the end and my fingers (Lew said the couplets were SOP, or words to that effect--and in view of how sharp some of the threads are, I'm happy to cover them). With 15 4' pipe clamps, a guy can dream! ; )
I was thinking screwing a couple of them together to help clamp a board using the end of my garage, a brick wall, to provide the basis for a concrete repair:
| < ---garage door opening--->| || <<------------- brick wall. | {============| || } <<--------- pipe clamp
The idea is to fill in the area against the board (===============) with concrete (quikrete). My biggest concern was that I could break the brick on the brick wall, but I hope that if I distribute the tension accross a few bricks I may be ok. Engineers: Do (housing)bricks have the sort of strength that will permit this sort of force/tension (or is this a stupid idea)???
DM and others mentioned space under the bench. Yes, I too see that precious space under the bench is wasted. For space, Mr. Hack only adds two 4.5" x 19" top draws and a till. At present, there is 9" of height to push boxes of stuff underneath--and "you just know" some squatter would mosey by and push something under there... I'll keep working on it!
Swingman has mentioned again how SketchUp facilitates thinking about design. He is More Than right! Of course, SketchUp has a way of sucking a few hours out of you in exchange too. But if quality is a priority, it seems like time well-spent.
Bill <Custom Traditional Workbenches, Ltd., since 2011> : )
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Just fixing the diagram above. ========= is the wooden (support) board.
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Again, the diagram is fighting me.
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*snip*

Don't be afraid to shut off Sketchup and go out and make sawdust. Not every detail has to be shown, it just all has to be planned. ;-)
That's what I did on my latest project... and it's turned out acceptable thus far.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

School will be out in 2 weeks and I'll be cutting loose in several directions! In the meantime, I'm carrying a 60% higher than typical workload--but just for 2 more weeks!
If it werent' for the Wreck and everything, a "workbench" would have been a weekend project! I watched my dad assemble his. He let me pound lots of nails in the 1/4" plywood top (good memory-- my first meaningful use of a hammer). They havent' fallen out yet.
Bill

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

There was a time when that was my SOP! I made a "box hockey" game like that in my youth that was pretty popular among my friends. It had two hinges and folded up like a suitcase--it opened to 6 or 7 feet long and had a hole on each end ("goal") and a tunnel in the middle.. I'm sure I used nothing but a coping saw--and surely no more sandpaper than absolutely necessary. Painted it and the two plywood paddles black. The paddle that looked worse (remember that coping saw) was the good shooter...who would have known. I forget what we used for a puck. I made fancier stuff, a lamp, cutting board, bird feeder, etc. in HS, but the hockey game was surely my most enjoyed project. My mom is still using the cutting board daily after 30 years. but I've inquired enough to realize it doesn't make the slightest bit of difference to her that it was handmade--it just works well. Yep, the hockey game was "sport"!
Bill
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Oh, it's not too bad, once you lose the feeling in your fingers... I couldn't wait to assemble my bandsaw.
Whereabouts in Indiana, neighbor?
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said:

South of Indianapolis, not too far outside the I-465-loop. How about yourself?
Bill
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North of Indianapolis, not too far outside the I-465 loop. Wanna come up and help unload a SawStop? <grin>
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"Steve" wrote:

------------------------------------------- That's puts you within spittin distance of the "Pyramids".
Lew
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