Woodworking suggestions for New England trip

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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The Hummer, I suspect, is a width issue. I rode it on a motorcycle and there were places where I was worried about clearing oncoming traffic. It's a very narrow, twisty road with rock walls on one side and sheer drops of several hundred feet on the other and no guard rails. Trying to back up to a wider space is very likely to end up in someone going over a cliff.
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In that case, the typical Hummer driver would not want to take his vehicle up the road. It could get dirty and scratched. On my last trip to Italy, the villa we rented was un a narrow road on a hill, one lane in many places. The drops were only 20 or 30 feet and it took a few trips before I was comfortable driving on the outside.
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Must be a long cog rail line. Mount Washington is on the other side of New Hampshire from Vermont. ;-)

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Must be a long cog rail line. Mount Washington is on the other side of New Hampshire from Vermont. ;-)

I seem to misspeak (or write) all the tome these days. :-) Sigh .. . . . . . .
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

You're among friends here. Most of us do farts and brown-outs at inappropriate times. Sigh...     creak,     jo4hn
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<snippage>

As a Vermonter, I would like to be able to claim Mount Washington for Vermont, but it's still in New Hampshire. Not that it's any less worth visiting for that reason; or at least not too much less worth visiting.
In my part of Vermont, the Lincoln gap, Applacian gap, and Smuggler's notch are all worth driving over (and all within reach of each other). There's plenty of hiking opportunities in both states, too; Camel's Hump is quite popular locally, and with good reason: it's not too difficult of a day hike, and the view from the top on a clear day is absolutely amazing. You can make out Mount Washington from there if it's very clear, in fact.
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Don't know if you've been to New England before--it's a lot smaller than it looks on a map. If you live in Hartford, then New York and Boston are a day trips (i.e. you get up in the morning, drive to one or the other, do your shopping or whatever, and come home--be aware though that parking in NYC is hideously expensive, but it's not nearly as unpleasant a place to drive as it's made out to be--most of the traffic is commercial with professional drivers, and somebody who drives for a living in NYC learns to do it well or doesn't last very long). Hartford to Quebec is only a few hours as well (and don't neglect Canada, but that probably won't be an option for you if you're after foliage in October). If you don't have reservations then plan on stopping early, and carry camping equipment just in case--in the peak areas lodging fills up fast.
Something else that might go well on the trip is covered bridges--New England has more than 70 of them, some of which are still in daily use for road traffic, while others are exhibits. A covered bridge with good foliage can be a nice image.
By the way, something to try for if you want an absolutely _spooky_ experience--try to drive through NYC (I mean down Broadway in Manhattan, not across town on one of the expressways) just at sunrise on a Sunday morning. I did it once, just by an accident of travel timing and taking the wrong turn, and, well, that was 30 years ago and it's still a strong memory.

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On Jul 15, 4:08am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

It's difficult to do that time of the year (hotels tend to be booked far in advance), but I'd try to keep the schedule flexible. Each year is different, but the peak leaf can vary by a couple of weeks and in a given year will vary by two or three weeks depending on where you are. More Northerly and higher elevations being substantially earlier. She's right about having to drive to them. ...and "they" move.
If you can get there, I'd recommend Smuggler's Notch and Lincoln Gap in Vermont. Stowe, VT (close to both) is a nice day trip too. VT100 and VT108 are very pretty roads that time of year. When we lived in Vermont, Newport was a favorite early season leaf peeping destination. Lake Memphremagog is outrageous when the leaves are in full color.
If you like watching leftist loons in their natural habitat, Church Street in Burlington is good for lunch.
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http://www.berkproducts.com / do a search for berkshire veneer do a search for Shaker hancock village thats the one with the large round stone barn that youve proably seen above 3 are western MA in berkshire county Just across into NY is another shaker Village Deerfield MA has Deerfield Village with 1600's houses that can be toured with furniture in tack In that same town your wife might like Yankee Candle flagship store ( I dont)
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Fryeburg fair, usually the first week of October.

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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com writes:

If your trip happens to coincide with one of our guild meetings, feel free to stop by and say "Hi!"
http://www.gnhw.org /
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wrote:

A few possibilities in Vermont:
The American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT is a fascinating place. It's mostly machine tool related stuff (broadly speaking), but I think that falls within the tool category. It's been many years since I last visited; I should get back there again. http://www.americanprecision.org /
If you're into carved birds, the Birds of Vermont museum in Huntington, VT is nearly a must-see. If you're not into carved birds (or birds in general), it's probably somewhat less interesting. Until only a month or so ago, I lived just a couple doors down from this museum. http://www.birdsofvermont.org /
The Shelburne Museum is pretty well known, and has (among a vast array of assorted things) a fair bit wood and wood-related, including a large collection of decoys and horse-drawn vehicles. This is another museum I need to get back to soon, as it's been quite a few years since I was there. http://www.shelburnemuseum.org /
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
  Click to see the full signature.
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