Woodworking at the library

I recently completed some bookshelves for our local public library. Its a small community an the library gets by on one paid employee and a bevy of volunteers. My next door neighbor is a retired physician and he sits on the board for the library (he also takes their trash to the dump on Saturdays).
I worked out a deal by which he would give to me the bulk of his red oak stash (about 700 bf of 4/4), felled by him, but has gone largely untouched for the past 17 years. I would build the shelves and keep the remainder for whatever. The oak is of so-so quality; there are plenty of knots, but hey, it's free wood.
http://www.cefls.org/Trailblazerspring2008.pdf (see page 3.)
Allison, the librarian, is organizing a series of presentations by local persons on various topics relating broadening ones interests (hobbies of you will). She has asked me to give a 1/2 hour presentation to a group of 8 to 12-year-olds on woodworking as a hobby. Show, touch and tell examples are required.
I'm *not* going to give a "how-to" presentation. I don't think its practical for that location, time frame and audience.
What I think I will do is talk about various types (specialties) of woodworkers what they do and some of the tools that they use. With a tangent into local wood species, this will give me an opportunity to display: - various wood samples, - partially and fully turned bowls - boxes and totes - some handmade tooling ( mallets, etc) - A few manufactured hand tools such planes spokeshaves and scrapers
I think that this will give lots of opportunity fore the audience to safely handle, while being fairly simple to transport.
I'm looking for a list of "woodworker specialties" to reference in my presentation. here's what I thought of so far:
Framer Finish carpenter Cabinetmaker Turner Cooper Luthier Carver
What else should I add to the list?
Also, any suggestions what I might include in the presentation would be welcomed.
Thanks,
Steve
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Good job on the bookshelves, Steve. Nice thing to do.
I think tying woodworking into the fabric of history would sell pretty well to a bunch of goobers. Anything to capture the imagination. Trades like bodgers would be interesting. They'd frequently be set up in the woods to cut saplings and turn them to size by the hundreds on pole lathes for chair making and such. From Wikipedia: "The term "bodger" stems from pole lathe turners who used to make the chair legs and spindles. A bodger would typically purchase all the trees on a plot of land, set up camp on the plot, and then fell the trees and turn the wood. The spindles and legs that were produced were sold in bulk, for pence per dozen. The bodger's job was considered unfinished because he only made component parts. The term now describes a person who leaves a job unfinished, or does it badly." Maybe you should leave out that last sentence!
Here's a list of colonial trades that has some interesting and funny ones: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sam/occupation.html
If your library doesn't have Eric Sloane's book, Sketches of America Past, it should: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Eric-Sloanes-Sketches-of-America-Past/Eric-Sloane/e/9780883940655 Lots of excellent sketches about colonial tools and items.
R
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Honestly, I'd touch briefly on the topics you've mentioned and then head straight into images of really unique woodworking projects. Things like cars, motorbikes or anything else that is a one of a kind and made totally out of wood. 8-12 year olds are going to want something that is really interesting and likely wouldn't be much interested in a lecture. Wow them with things made out of wood that one would never think of. Perhaps it will inspire the emergence of the next Stickley or even a Norm. That's the way I'd go, but that's just me.
http://www.woodworkersauction.com/amazprojferrari.htm
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While it's not common now. you could list "Shipwright" Also not so common would be Bowyer and Fletcher both in archery
On Thu, 3 Jul 2008 07:57:50 -0400, "StephenM"

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On Thu, 03 Jul 2008 07:57:50 -0400, StephenM wrote:

You might want to add some examples of marquetry and intarsia. I think that would intrigue a lot of the kids. Even some woodburning might not be amiss.
We get lots of customers in the local Woodcraft who do bows, walking sticks, pool cues, and gunstocks. And a very large number who do pen turning.
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Just brainstorming now... Depending on how you define woodworking--you might look at a more encompassing/expanded definition, which could include sawyers, loggers, foresters, firewood processors, pallet manufacturers, etc. Just to show that there is a wide range to the occupations involved in working with wood.
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I would think (reminding myself of my 8yr old nephew and his buddies - some a little older) that you need to remember the attention span of your audience.
Delving into the nuances, history and minutiae or woodworking wouldn't keep their attention for more than a few minutes.
Probably just about anything would be fine as long as it was well presented in a lively manner. Especially if you have visual aids. If you try to give a comprehensive overview of woodworking and its applications, you will lose them fast.
Robert
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Thanks all for the suggestions and the guidance.
I'm going to keep it low tech (no powerpoint) but heavy on the heavy on the project items that can be passed around and touched.
I'll make sure that I include a couple novice items so that it stays attainable.
I'll hand out a few turned tops... kids love a freeebee.
Thanks,
Steve

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It might help to consider including a short discussion of small projects that kids their age might want to do that they might not think of as woodworking but actually are the seeds of the beginnings of a woodworker, such as, making a scooter out of wood using old skate wheels, or making a go cart using baby coach type wheels. Others in the rec may have even more creative ideas on this subject.
Lot's of luck, Philly

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I "ooh and ahh" over many of the pictures of projects contributed to FWW magazine. You might be able to use some of them. I think I would clip a few pictures from a recent Walmart ad too, for the sake of comparison! I think it would be really interesting to see if the children could tell the difference, or if they cared. Mabye "caring about quality" is an "adult thing"--I'm not sure. I think you are planting seeds...enjoy!
Bill
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Nice job on the bookshelves, they look like they must weigh a ton! Very Nice.

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Perhaps as a whole they do, but I delivered the carcases without the tops attached and with no shelves installed. I could easily pick up a frame and move it around myself
Thanks,
Steve
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