Woodshop for less than $1,000??

Page 1 of 2  

"The American Woodshop" TV show, hosted by Scott Phillips recently ran an episode claiming a woodshop could be outfitted for about $1,000 (major tools only, didn't include all the hand tools, clamps, etc required). I am curious if anyone knows what tools (makes, models, etc.) that he used in this or if anyone could recommend their own list. In the episode Scott had a table saw, drill press, planer, jointer, miter saw...I'm not sure what else. I didn't noitce a router, but you'd think that's a mandatory item as well.
Anyway, it seems it would cost more than $1,000 for all of these, unless you got real low quality tools, but I'd like to hear what everyone has to say.
I was thinking about a Delta TS300 Table Saw as a starter for $300 (or maybe the Bosch 4000-09, but I think it's about $450). Any thoughts on this.
What are some good and affordable jointers and planers? What do you think about a drum sander in a small home woodshop?
I hope this will be a good discussion.
Thanks for all the help and thoughts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

SNIP
The PBS that I get doesn't carry the show. A good suggestion to find out what he used to equip the shop might be on the American Woodshop web site (http://www.americanwoodshop.org /). A quick look there gives the topics of the shows by season and I didn't find it in season 11 or 12 but didn't seach any further. Also check with your PBS station schedule to find out the episode number.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There have been a few of these done of the years.
Tablesaw is the biggest expense and always a bit of a compromise.
Then a $250 or so lunch box planer, then a $199 6" benchtop jointer. With the tablesaw, jointer, planer as the anchor, a $90.00 bench top drill press with a rotary sander kit added for god measure.
They always got a bit over, but you could make afew things with that set up, router likely comes in next to buy.
In my shop I've sold a few items i had a long time, bought a few at good prices.
Jet 10" contractors saw with upgraded 2hp motoer and original Jet fench replaced by a 52" Vega I got it with a mobile cart built under for $350.00. Tossed the blade, bought a forest WWII.
So I'm in $450, the factory original fence was sold on Ebay for $50.00 net, so I'm in $400. I also sold my old delta table saw which this replaced for $70.00, so net that out too.
Sold an engine I had around for 15 years on a stand for $800 which bought me a 8" Jointer from an Ebay auction in Californa that I got one friend to pick up and bring to his work in Ca, and a truck friend to bring it to Washington. No cost. AND it bought a Dewalt DW735 planer with wings.
When I picked up a Ryobi resaw bandsaw, which is a bit small, but takes baldes up to 2" wide. THis was $100.00 I have about another $100 into other blades. Noisy as hell.
Got a OSS for christmas, most of the rest I had around for years, and I've learned to use my handplanes to good effect most of the time.
Don't under estimate how much work can be done with a few basic electric tools and some handtools.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You really know how to work it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

a drum sander is a luxury for someone who's thinking of getting a $300 TS. I've got $13,000+ worth of equipment and I'm still on the fence about spending $1,400 for a drum sander.
Buy what you need when you need it, rather than buying a lot of cheap "everything". It'll cost more in the long run, when you replace the cheap stuff.
Dave
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a $250 TS and just bought drum sander. Not a damn thing wrong with a good used $250 TS. (Okay, its not a $1,600 TS...)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://harborfreight.com/ ... you COULD do it!
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not everything has to be new. There are a lot of very good quality used tools out there. Check out ebay and craigs list for starters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may be able to buy most items of a good quality for this amount, but they will be used. Classifieds, garage sales etc. You need to know what things are worth. If you are talking new equipment, it will be the lesser quality models. If you are willing to think of the $1000 as seed money and can accept the fact that you will be replacing many of the tools in the future when you can't stand them anymore, then go for it.
I would spend more money on the most important tools first and do without the others until necessary. For example, you can get a nice 3hp grizzly cabinet style table saw in the $900 range. For 99.99% of woodworkers, this is the last tablesaw you will ever need to buy. The absence of a planer and jointer means that you can't surface your own rough lumber at first. Either by presurfaced lumber for your first projects or learn to prepare them the old fashioned way. You can do without a drillpress at first, use a cordless drill. It is very irritating to replace every tool that you purchased at first one at a time because you are unhappy with them. Don't ask me how I know this.

I think they are expensive and not necessary. Of course,,,, I still want one!
Frank <--- about to replace his contractor's tablesaw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/11/2005 11:09 PM Frank Ketchum mumbled something about the following:

But then there are those of us who have to purchase the smaller equip because we don't have the space, get more space, purchase larger equipment and get rid of smaller equipment, get even more space, get even larger equipment and get rid of midsized equipment. Then we reverse, get smaller space, have to get rid of large equipment and purchase smaller equipment.
--
Odinn - replaced more tools than I care to admit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My address is ...!
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/12/2005 2:47 PM nospambob mumbled something about the following:

I didn't specify which kinds of tools I've replaced :)
--
Odinn - Most expensive tools I've replaced were my auto shop tools.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Delta is one of the underwriters for The American Woodshop so I would guess that the sub-$1000 woodshop would be equipped with bottom of the range Delta tools.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

_________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It strikes me that while you can equip a woodshop with new tools for a grand or so, it makes much more sense to go the used tool route. I recently saw a couple of good contractor's saws in local ad papers for $400 or less. A decent drill press for $125. No jointer or planer has showed up yet, but...
Used tools in good condition--check, and make sure, that they're running and in good tune before even considering making an offer--would mean a double step in quality, and sometimes capacity, and maybe more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

grand
a
but...
and
While I agree that the used market can yeild some decent equipment at a good price, someone who has never owned a table saw is likely to be the least qualified person to asess it's present condition.
On the couple of occasions when I have sold items, I made a special point of demoing the equipment before being asked.
If you can, bring along a buddy with some experience.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good point. You can buy used if you know what your looking for. Most new woodworkers do not. The big question is...are you building bird houses or a table for twelve. A table for twelve would be considerably more difficult on a tool budget of 1000.00. But I could build one heck of a bird house with a 200.00 Ryobi table saw. I've worked on many a types of tools and the cliche "you get what you paid for" certainly rings true when buying tools.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<<It strikes me that while you can equip a woodshop with new tools for a grand or so, it makes much more sense to go the used tool route. I recently saw a couple of good contractor's saws in local ad papers for $400 or less. A decent drill press for $125. No jointer or planer has showed up yet, but...>>
I completely agree. Most of my stationary tools are used. Although my present table saw was purchased new from Sears, I bought its predecessor at an antique fair for about $250. I found my RAS in the Bargain Shopper for $75, bought Barry's old jointer for $250 (I think; might even have been less), AJ's old planer for $100. And my band saw and stationary belt sander were even better deals. Since I didn't see the American Woodshop program that the OP mentioned, I was just speculating that Scott Philips might have shown the audience a collection of low-end Delta tools because Delta puts up some of the dough for the show.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

_________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

Ya know you can always look on ebay if your not in any hurry. I got a Jet Cabinet Saw used 4 times for 400.00 with all the extras. Of course you have to go and pickup these items but hell it's worth it.
Rich
--
"you can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11 Dec 2005 13:34:30 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

Most of us are accustomed to having the table saw be the cornerstone and catch all tool that does all sorts of stuff it wasn't even really intended for. But at this price level I would skip it. Unless you can get a good deal on a used one it's either going to take up half the budget for a decent one or be the first tool you have to upgrade.
14" band saw $350 Circular saw $150 10" Miter Saw $200 Router $200
Total $900
The last $100 can get you a drill press, hand planes, part way to a jointer, or count towards your hand tools/clamps/blades/bits.
Next purchase would be the buy-it-once cabinet saw.
-Leuf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leuf wrote:

I agree with this sentiment, and with the list except for the last two items. Well, maybe the router. And possibly a little drill press.
I haven't found a job (in my meager, hobbiest experience) the miter saw was necessary for.
That being said, the band saw is the all-purpose tool I'd buy first. I'm still doing it all with hand tools right now except for a skil table top bandsaw I picked up at a garage sale for $5.
The bandsaw is awful. I put a scroll blade on it and the drift was so severe it can't just be called drift. And the degree of it changes with the thickness of the stock being cut. Worst of all, frequently the blade would grab the tire and yank it off the lower (powered) wheel.
It's still useful... until I either get a bandsaw or decide to stick with hand tools (the idea of resawing wood is daunting, but so is laying out cash needed for other things.) I can use it for making relief cuts and finishing with a bowsaw.
I'm seeing situations that could be done on the table saw or the bandsaw, and I'm seeing things that can be done on the bandsaw but not the table saw (er... well, a circular saw and jigs are needed, and there will be post-cut dressing of the new edge.) I don't see (and would like someone to show me :) a (hobby) situation that a table saw can do that a bandsaw/circularsaw/handtools combination couldn't do at least as well given a little extra time.
And time is irrelevant if doing it is the end itself. :)
I want to make things for pleasure. What I want to make is rather open ended... actually it involves robot chassis (chasses? chassises?) and gears but all this requires benches, cabinets, etc. and to make those I need tools. So the tools will enable me to make things, but why lay out so much $$$ for tools when I can satisfy my desire to make things by making the tools? Soon I'll post what I've done thus far (marking gauge, bowsaw, marking knife, plane, blade adjusting hammer.) with no powertools beyond a lousy bandsaw and a lousy benchtop drill press borrowed from a friend.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.