Wood working plans

I decided to quit procrasting and build my daughter a spinning wheel. Looked over the internet and saw a nice Saxon type wheen at WoodCraftPlans.com. The price was not bad ($14.95) so I ordered the small wheel and the larger one. Two things about these plans
1) They are not plans just two pages of mechanical drawings. There is no parts layout (though there is a parts list, which has an error in it), no detailed pictures of how things go together and no full size layout of the indiviudal pieces AND SOME OF THIS STUFF IS CRITICAL.
2) When you call for help, Dad is willing and helpful - to a degree. Son, who evidently now owns the business, is somewhat less so. Neither are fully up to speed on their plans.
Just a word to the wise.
Deb
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"Dr. Deb" wrote:

As a guy, who in another life, spent a fair amount of time on the drafting board, I'm a little puzzled.
If you were provided with mechanical drawings having at least 3 views, you have a full set of plans.
If you were expecting exploded view isometric drawings, now that is a different can of worms.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yes to the latter. I was expecting a set with all parts shown full size - but have enough experience to figure most things out. But some things are not intuitive, like the wheel. The joint on the wheel rim is a miter, but the pieces are cut at 14 3/4" to make a 20 3/4" wheel. What you need to do is lay the pieces on the drawing and figure out where to clip the corners (which I did on the "second" set of rim pieces I cut :-( )
The first of what you refered to is correct, except on this set there are not full drawings of some critical points and you have to stop, study, figure and guess. Sometimes the most critical items are the least clear. But it is not something that you cannot work through, by taking it slow and easy.
The whole reason for the original post was for to alert beginning woodworkers who might be looking for a set of "plans." (i.e., full size parts layout, etc.). These ain't them.
Deb
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"Dr. Deb" wrote:

Way back when, courses in "blue print reading" were considered as an integral part of industrial arts training.
Mechanical scale drawings were considered to be a means of written communication between the designer and the builder.
The advent of computer technology has brought major changes to the medium.(Isometrics and exploded views are much easier to produce)
As far as full size drawings are concerned, be pretty difficult for anything other than small items.
OTOH, full size cross section detail drawings can be very useful.
Hope you had fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yes, and I have learned a thing or two. So, all in all, it has been a benefical experience.
Don't get me wrong, I don't have any problem reading the drawing, it is just that it could use a few more views for clarity.
Deb
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"Dr. Deb" wrote:

Think of it as grunt work<G>.
You learn to appreciate it after the fact<G>.
Lew
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You have to read (and understand) the fine print. If you see "measured drawing) it is not a full size plan and will have to be scaled up using grid paper. Like you, I prefer full sized when practical, for odd shaped or intricate parts.
HINT: If you think you will ever make a second copy of the project, make templates from 1/8" hardboard.
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Just a heads up...
Even though you have the parts right, and all the subassemblies constructed to fit together....
There is a lot of art to making and using a spinning wheel. My siste did a lot of spinning, and had to do a lot of tuning of a boughten wheel, that was supposed to be a good one.
If you can, might be a good idea to have a spinner review the critical parts with you.
Old Guy

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Thu, Dec 11, 2008, 7:15pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@mon-cre.net (Dr.Deb) doth sayeth: I decided to quit procrasting and build my daughter a spinning wheel. Looked over the internet and saw a nice Saxon type wheen at WoodCraftPlans.com. The price was not bad ($14.95) so I ordered the small wheel and the larger one. Two things about these plans 1) They are not plans just two pages of mechanical drawings. <snip>
Just stopped by with a Christmas Card and saw this. You should have gone to your local library. Our local library isn't huge but they do have books with plans for spnning wheels, and the pns are free. You do have to return the book thery're in. Or, my favorite used book store often has books with spinning wheel plans in them. I have several books with them. Always visit your local librry for plans first. There are free plans on the web too, with a bit of looking.
JOAT Where the choice is between only violence and cowardice, I would advise violence. - Mohandas Gandhi
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