Wobble Dado

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I've got a Craftsman Wobble Dado blade (set), and have been having trouble getting an accurate adjustment. If I try to set it to a specific width, and then properly tighten the blade bolt, the pressure causes it to expand. Is there anything I can do to keep it the proper size while tightening it down?
Puckdropper
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reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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Puckdropper wrote:

Try holding it by the hub instead of the blade...
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

If there is room try using a large spring clamp to hold both the front and back hubs from in place.
Keep in mind that accuracy in other areas is impossible to accomplish. The exact depth of the dado is impossible to achieve as the bottom of the dado is rounded. Because of this the sides of the dado will establish the full depth that a mating panel or board can be inserted. The center of the dado will be lower and the wider the dado the more this becomes a problem.
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

You and the guy pushing on a rope have a lot in common.
You can't get there from here.
Time to start saving for a stacked dado.
Lew
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He says... after encouraging me to look at a box joint a few weeks ago. ;-) I'm just poking fun, Lew.
I've been looking at my stacked dado options, but will have to save up for it. Until then, I'll keep trying to work with the tool I have.
Puckdropper
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reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

Now you know what motivated me to get mine<G>.

If I were you, I'd think router as a short term solution.
Lew
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I use a Forrest Dado King stacked dado set and it is very nice, and expensive.
If I were to do it again, I'd go with the Freud stacked dado set that uses a "detent dial" on the outer blade to fine tune the width of of the dado with out using shims. About the same price as what I paid for the Forrest set.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 743&filter=freud
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That looks like a nice solution. I usually used my calipers to set the stack, but I always seem to be re-shimming for that last RCH. I always thought the RAS was a better machine for cutting dados in narrower boards, like shelving uprights, because the depth approach is so radically different than the dado on a table-saw, which doesn't account for variations in material thickness. Neither does the dado made with a hand-held router account for material thickness differences. Today's plywood is all over the place.
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snip
That looks like a nice solution. I usually used my calipers to set the stack, but I always seem to be re-shimming for that last RCH. I always thought the RAS was a better machine for cutting dados in narrower boards, like shelving uprights, because the depth approach is so radically different than the dado on a table-saw, which doesn't account for variations in material thickness. Neither does the dado made with a hand-held router account for material thickness differences. Today's plywood is all over the place.
We, Swingman and I have been testing his set in his shop for 2 or 3 years now, it is pretty much fumble proof.
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Wish I'd seen that a year ago when I bought my 8" Freud set. How easy is it with this set to sneak up on an exact size?
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wrote in message

I have only watched Swingman make the adjustment but he writes measurements down so that he can repeat them nonths later. Basically you stack the chippers which BTY are have abnormally wide teeth and add the last outer blade. That last blade has a center screw hub that adjusts in even increments with each detent click. I'd have to say that if the measurement was not quite right you could loosen the arbor nut, grabe the blade and turn the hub one or several more clicks.
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That's as good a recommendation as one would need. You're talking about that new-fangled dial/stack thingamajig?
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I'm curious as to how it works. Leon? Does it turn some of the chippers into wobblers or does it just separate them a bit emulating a stacked setup with some shims inserted?
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Upscale wrote:

I've posted about this before, but it's been a few years.
No "wobblers", no shims ... "dial-in" widths from <1/4 to 29/32" in .004 increments simply by turning the dial on the outer blade clockwise/counterclockwise.
Example:
~current project - dadoes to accept nominal 3/4" plywood - use two outside blades, three inside chippers, and +17 clicks on the dial.
~current project - dadoes to accept nominal 1/4" plywood - use two outside blades, NO inside chippers, and -4 clicks on the dial.
I do a setup, one time and at the beginning of every project, based on the plywood bought for that project.
With only one table saw there is always a necessity for blade changes, from dado, to standard and back, no matter how well you plan your batch cuts in hardwood or sheetgoods. Thus precision repeatability from change to change is BIG factor in $aving time.
In that regard, we take care to order the blades precisely when putting them on, and taking them off the saw. Nothing complicated, it's as simple as putting them back in the box in the same order they come off the arbor, and vice versa.
With that one action, you never need to change the settings from one blade change to the next for that project as long as the plywood is from the same batch. Simply dial in your clicks, put the blades on in the same order they came off, set the blade height, and off you go.
If you do need to make the rare adjustment there is no need to remove the blades, just loosen the arbor nut, make your click adjustments clockwise or counterclockwise in .004" increments, re-tighten, and go about your business.
We cut miles of dadoes on a kitchen project and there NO way I would ever go back to a shimmed dado stack.
I've got a high dollar shimmed Amana dado set that's been gathering dust for four years. One of these days I would like to drive another table saw under it just to be able to say I have a one size, dedicated, "dado saw". :)
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SNIP
Wow.... doesn't that sound like a sweet setup. If I was in a position to build a bunch of cabinets, it would seem to pay for itself on just one project just from the time savings alone.
Neat.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Been using it for about five years now so that I don't even think about it ... thought everyone had one by now. :)
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Is that a drive by neener by any chance Karl? :)
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Upscale wrote:

Maybe five years ago ... :)
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wrote in message

In a previous post I mentioned that the chippers have abnormally wide teeth. The outer adjustable blade simply moves in and or out parallel to the chippers according to how far out the hub is screwed in or out. the wide teeth on the chippers allow the outer blade to move in and or out with out creating a gap.
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"Leon" wrote

So that the chippers will always take out the groove, while the outside blades are microadjusted for width?
Does that mean the adjustment takes place in the shaft through the center of the dado set?
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