Winter's on it's way- any tips for heating a garage-type shop?

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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 20:06:29 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@the.shop wrote:

No, if I do that, they stay there! Hauling fiberglass above your head once is plenty! :)

True, but for under $120 I could sheetrock the whole deal and call it good as well- the problem is convincing the wife of that!
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 16:53:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@the.shop wrote:

I have one 220 outlet, but is it upstairs in the house. I might be able to run a cable, but it would be hanging loose in the air, and I'm not sure that's a real good idea.

Legal here, but I'm not sure I want the hassle. It is a messy option, for sure.

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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 10:14:45 -0500, Prometheus
I've done 2 things so far and they made last winter more tolerable.. (if you can call what we have in Calif. winters)
I added 2 of those oil filled heaters at the 2 draftiest places in the garage, set on about 3 (settings are 0 -10, I think) and on 24/7... they don't really heat, as much as break the chill and circulate the warmth..
I built a box for the end of the dryer hose, using a wood box and 2 furnace filters, so I could vent the dryer inside the garage without a lot of lint and moisture in the air.. worked good last year and I didn't notice any more rust than before... and my wife loves it, since I tend to do the laundry in the winter.. lol
Something else you might try, (HF to the rescue!), is a radiant heater that clamps onto a bbq-size (5 gal?) propane tank..
We use one on our enclosed patio and it makes a lot of difference... we use it almost every night and use between 2 and 3 tanks a winter... I don't think I'd use one in my garage, because I do a lot of painting and finishing, but it would be safer than a wood stove, for sure..

Mac
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wrote:

Not compared to Wisconsin! We actually have -80F wind-chill days here...

Kerosine?
I thought of that- the ol' "mr. heater" but I had a friend who used that in his garage for smokers, and it did very little good.

I don't know about that- wood stoves are pretty safe, they're just a lot of work to keep filled all the time.

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On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 19:20:58 -0500, Prometheus

nah... winter here means that you put on a long sleeve shirt to pick oranges in the yard.. *g* (a "cold" morning is in the low 30's)

sorry, should have caught that.. it plugs into a 110 outlet.. takes forever to start putting out heat but works well if left on 24/7 at lower setting..

the Mr. Heater and heater buddy are more for camping.. this is a big ugly thing that clamps on to the handle/ring of a propane tank and is directional.. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber017
we got this one, the model without the sensor is $20 less...
a few of my neighbors got those $100 ones that look like a mushroom or something and have to huddle around it.. ours throws heat in one direction, but for at least 5 or 6 feet..
Mac
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wrote:

Around here winter is cold enough. Around mid-January when we get a brief few day long break from the sub-zeroes we feel like shirt sleeve weather at single digits. But then again, we define summer as six weeks of terrible snowmobiling.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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wrote:

Ah, yes- one of those things that look like a hot-water register. I had one of those, but they just don't do the trick in this application. Too bad, because it seemed to be great on electricity.

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Prometheus wrote:

I still like the solar heating option. It worked for my shop in SE Minnesota and works for my shop here in (tropical) central Iowa. Over the last year I've posted enough photos and drawings to ABPW to make design a non-problem - check the archive.
Depending on how much time you plan to spend in the shop over the winter, it may be worth looking for a good deal on insulation for the ceiling and on weatherstripping for doors and windows.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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wrote:

I do too... I may check that out as an option in addition to a propane heater.

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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 10:14:45 -0500, Prometheus

[snip] The propane jet type heaters are clean, warm up the shop in quickly, and can be controlled by a thermostat. They are a bit noisy though and eat 20lb tanks rather quickly. I used one in a garage as you described, I think it was a 80k btu heater. It will take a while to warm up the heavy cast iron where your hands won't freeze to it in the really cold weather. A couple of years ago we moved and I now a have a smaller but insulated shop with a "Modine Hot Dawg" style heater and have so much more enjoyed doing shop time in the winter. Something about being warm and watching the snow fly by the shop window makes living here almost sane. A nice bonus is you don't have to worry about glue and other stuff freezing.
-- John, in Minnesota
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Our garage isn't insulated at all, so when it's -15 here in central Minnesota I just don't go out there. But when I do need to do some work in the winter, I dress warmly and heat the place with a kerosene heater like this: http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp ? product_id#49688&catH63&type=1&deptT28&path=0%3A5428%3A92523% 3A4863 It does 20,000+ BTUs cheaply (runs many hours on a gallon of fuel), which is enough to make it possible to work with a sweater on...say +45 indoors on a cold day. It's not enough to warm more than the air though, so any metal tools with much mass at all (i.e. table saw) never do warm up enough to touch. Still, it's cheap, seems safe, and it pretty nice to slide over next to my stool if I'm working at the bench for an hour or so on a day I'd rather not be outside at all.
-Derek
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 21:02:14 -0500, "John, in MN"

I think I'll use a 100lb tank anyhow, it's only a $40 deposit here. I suppose the heavy iron problem is one minor advantage to having a lot of starter "benchtop"-type tools.

Luckily, I have a small utility room inside for glue and finishes- I plan on using that for all my finishing work.
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 10:14:45 -0500, Prometheus

Ah, so you're the *one*...

Waitadoggoneminnute -- ain't your name Prometheus?
I'm in a 3 car gar^H^H^Hshop - but only one is the shop. I have a little 1 unit Infrared $39 heater that plops ontop of a 20gal propane tank.
I flip it on at 5am and by 5:30 or so, it's warm enough in my Denver garage to get out there. Then I keep it on, and just aim it at my backside. It does the trick for me, with a couple of caveats:
- I've left Wisconsin for Denver, so it's a little warmer out here - If it's biiterly cold, I don't have to work out there, this is a hobby for me - If I had to do it over again, I'd pop for a double or triple unit - When I get 230V or a nat-gas-line run out there, I'll switch to something like that - Beware the CO - Again, living in Denver means 0% humidity, so I don't worry about rust - My garage is *somewhat* insulated. Most of it is. The door is not and about 1/4 of the walls are not.
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On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 16:07:39 GMT, patrick conroy

???
That's why I'm stealing all these ideas from you god-like folks. :)

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Don't know how it is with you cheeseheads, but it's 20F outside, and as I dug the last of the potatoes yesterday, it was snowing lightly. Time to sweep the chimney and get at heating.
My choice would be to heat the air in preference to the equipment - all that cold-soaking talk. Insulate, or at the minimum, isolate from the big space with visqueen or such, and get a high-efficiency wall-mount vented gas unit. You have natural? If not, propane.
This should have a good fan on it, because you want to warm yourself first. The moisture will go out the vent, not into rust on your cool tools, which any other kind of poorly vented or unvented space heat save electricity would do.
This will _not_ help the saltwater situation in the rest of the building if you push too much heat over there.
wrote:

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Even better is to heat the people, not the air. In a UK winter (barely below freezing at worst) then long-wavelength IR is the stuff to look at. White ceramic electric heater elements, not glowing red ones. It's very efficient and instant heat. I have 500W of it over my bench and that's plenty to keep me happy in a thick shirt and sweater.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Not to mention you can keep the beef warm on the serving table.
Fine for a neander at a bench, but unless you move the tools under the lamp to use them - could get expensive with several.
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Let the tools get cold - they don't complain.
I do store my handtools in a heated cupboard though, as an anti-condensation measure.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Oh that is sooooo passe'! It's Cheese Bras now, dontchaknow...

Only snow here is above 10,000 feet.
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Similar to here, but I'm hoping for another warm snap or two.

Visqueen? No natural gas, but propane is easily availible.

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