Wine cellar door question

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I am building a wine cellar. The door choices are mindboggling but I have narrowed it down to two similar doors (3'0x8'0, two panels, top is glass 2/3, bottom is raised panel 1/3). The first door is solid mahogany. The other is mahogany veneer over MDF. Both are rated for exterior. I am in FL. The cellar will be cooled to 55 (humidity at 60-70%), the other side will be at about 75, humidity at 40-50%. I'm told that the MDF will hold up better and not warp. Any thoughts?
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certified laminated veneer lumber (LVL) core not MDF.
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I made mine out of lauan door skins (1/8") sandwiching a extruded polystyrene core (blue Styrofoam) and a western red cedar 2X2 frame. More insulation = better
But living int he Yukon, the municipal water comes in at 2-4 degrees Celsius, so I run all my water through radiators on the wine cellar ceiling. Keeps it at 10-12 degrees all year round.
Luigi
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But living int he Yukon, the municipal water comes in at 2-4 degrees Celsius, so I run all my water through radiators on the wine cellar ceiling. Keeps it at 10-12 degrees all year round.
Luigi ***************************** That sounds lik a good way to drink lots of lead tainted water, unless you are very careful to use only radiators made without lead solder. That would limit you to only using plastic end cap radiators.
--
Jim in NC



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No, not really. Unless the water is significantly acidic, the amount of lead that leaches into it from leaded solder is really rather low, and allowing the tap to run for 30 to 60 seconds before filling one's glass eliminates nearly all of it.

What, you think he's running it through *automobile* radiators?? Could be, but I rather doubt it. More likely, he's using normal residential radiators, which are typically made of cast iron.
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On Aug 5, 9:07am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Or copper/aluminum fin tube baseboard radiators - probably the easiest way to have an in-line water heat exchanger hung from a ceiling.
R
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Condensation wouldn't become an issue?
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It's a wine cellar. Dank and dripping ceilings are a feature. ;)
I have no experience with them, so I can't comment on how an inline radiator would work out and how much condensation. A dehumidifier?
I was addressing my empathetic aching back's issue with hoisting a surplus cast iron radiator and suspending it from the ceiling. I see a bunch of downside, and not much upside with going cast iron.
R
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A fan controlled by a humidistat would be a better choice. Dehumidifiers put out a fair amount of heat, and unless there's a way to exhaust that from the room, it would likely defeat the purpose of using a water-chilled radiator.
And of course if the ambient humidity isn't very high to begin with, condensation isn't much of an issue.

So use a drywall hoist. <g> Actually, the downside is also the upside: lots of mass there. Once it's chilled, it's going to *stay* chilled.
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On Aug 5, 10:17am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

No condensation in the wine cellar itself, since it's already cool & we generally have low ambient humidity (I do live in Canada's driest city).

The thermal mass is supplied by the vino itself. The cellar is 4 feet by 10 feet by 8' high & generally holds three to five 54-litre (15 gallons, Doug) demijohns as well as a similar amount of bottled stuff. :-)
Luigi
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You make your own, then? How come I haven't ever seen you over at rec.crafts.winemaking?
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On Aug 5, 12:15pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Yes you have.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.crafts.winemaking/browse_frm/thread/12e662f91023fc18/ccfb8ed6c18567ec?hl=en&lnk=gst&q=Luigi#ccfb8ed6c18567ec
:-)
I was there in the mid-late 90s, but sort of gave up on it, don't exactly remember why.
Luigi
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That was eleven years ago! I've slept since then.

I mostly lurk there now.
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On Aug 6, 4:01am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

searched on Luigi in rec.crafts.winemaking, the first post that showed up also had Doug Miller participating in the same thread. ;-) I hadn't remembered that you participated in that group too.
Luigi
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It did on the way to the cellar. It dripped all over the suspended ceiling. But pipe insulation fixed that.
Luigi
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That's it. & soldered using lead-free solder by my plumber.
Luigi
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Good solution. Is there much condensation?
R
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Like I told Rob, only on the pipes leading to the cellar. That issue was solved using regular foam pipe insulation, not after ruining a number of ceiling tiles.
The wine cellar itself is drier than I would like, but that's not a serious issue. (yes I did try a humidifier which eventually crapped out & I didn't bother to replace it.
Luigi
Luigi
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I put a truck radiator in a garage window once (late 60's) and ran tapwater through it and used a box fan to blow the cool air into the garage. After a few minutes it started to cool off AND pretty much 'rain' in the garage ruining one of my Bardot posters. At first I thought the old rad had a leak in it.
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If the door is sealed on all six sides either one will do just fine.
R
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