Why no 3-wheel bandsaws?

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On 13 Jan 2004 20:36:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

big 3 wheelers have a big footprint. they have to have a much stiffer frame. the tighter radius is hard on the blades.
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I have both, though the 3 wheeler is for sale. The 3 wheeler goes through blades faster, due to stress of smaller diameter wheels and thinner baldes but has always tracked OK,even after 16 years of (ab)use... 2 wheelers are cheaper to manufacture. Less parts, easier to manufacture as 3rd idler wheel isn't there. The 3 wheelers are usually 'benchtop' units,semi portable while 2 wheelers are floor mounted beasts. hth jay
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On 13 Jan 2004 20:36:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

There are decent three wheelers around, but not many. If you see something like an Inca close up, it's huge.
One of the advantages of a two-wheel bandsaw is that it takes up very little workshop space relative to its capacity, being neatly arranged in a vertical stack. -- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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I have one of the older 16" Delta 28-560. It is a well built, sturdy saw that works great for small projects. It requires thinner (018" -.020") blades as well as a 1/2" max blade width. As a result the saw does not resaw very well. Most sawdust encrusted people need a saw that does both.
I really like having them both. The Delta with a 1/8" blade for quick and sharp corners and my new (very happy with) 16" Jet with a 1" resaw blade.
As compared to the standard 14" two wheeler, the 28-560 is built heavier than current models and I'm sure it, by today's standard, would cost as much or more to manufacture.
If you have room, find one and enjoy.
Dave
(Hylourgos) wrote:

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Grizzly makes a small one
http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G8976

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Why would you want to have 3 wheels when 2 will do?
Try COST being the determining factor.

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Willy Wanka wrote:

You can have a deeper throat, and it can sit on a bench. http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G8976
-- Mark
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My father had one... for about a day, please don't make me think about it.=) I can't remember who it was made by, likely Trademaster, smaller bench top size. The blade was a pain to set up, just when we thought it was ready to go, it would come off one of the wheels. Maybe it was ignorance, maybe a problem with the machine, bad design could is an option, you do get what you pay for, but that just can't justify everything. All I know is that he replaced it with a 14" 2 wheel and hasn't looked back.
HTH, Jeffo
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Jeffo wrote:

I started with a Black/Decker 3 wheel bandsaw years ago. I broke a blade almost every time I used it. I also burned up many moters. I always took it back to the store and they gave me a new one. I finally got tired buying new blades. They usually broke at the solder joint. I guess heat and bending caused this. My Delta 14" has never caused me a problem and has never broken a blade. My 2 cents!! Chuck B.
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It has alot to do with traction.....you don't get as much with less blade contact on three wheel saws as with 2 wheel saws. I bought an Amada saw once that could cut 36" thick steel 12 foot long on a power feed table, The capacity was an issue at the time. I asked about three wheel saws and the Amada people explained about blade traction and blade life.
The saw took a blade 1/8" x 2 5/8" x 19' 11"
John
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Here's one: http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?ItemNumber=G8976

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two?
There are three wheel bandsaws. They have at least two serious disadvantages: it's really hard to align the wheels and keep them aligned. Also, the blades tend to break much easier.
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Blades break when they're flexed repeatedly. They are flexed each time they pass over a wheel.
JK
Joel Jacobson wrote:

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I admit, I have that little Grizzly 3 wheeler. It's awful to set up, I can't get the table square to the blade, and if the blade slips off the wheel only once each time I use it, I feel pretty lucky. The access panel isn't hinged, so you have to take the whole side off each time you need to get inside, which is quite annoying. Also, the little feet on the bottom aren't square to each other or the saw body. I haven't broken any blades yet, but I have the speed set as low as I can to help keep the blade on the wheels, while still being able to manage making my cut. I wouldn't even DREAM of using it to resaw anything; it only has 3 5/16" cutting height anyway, regardless of what the website claims. In all, I'd say it was a waste of my 140 bucks plus whatever the shipping was. FWIW

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On 15 Jan 2004 14:14:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Garrett) wrote:

I wonder if it would be more useful as a band sander than as a band saw....
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On 13 Jan 2004 20:36:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

Duginski's book talks about this. Three-wheel machines are more difficult to tune, more expensive to make, and blades wear out faster. Better to have a large two-wheeler than a small three-wheeler with the same capacities.
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