Why Joiners shouldn't use nails

I'll bet this guy will start using less hardware in his joinery. http://www.thisisnorthscotland.co.uk/displayNode.jsp?nodeId 9475&command=displayContent&sourceNode9205&contentPK983748
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Been there, done that. sunk a 1 1/2 " brad into arm bone just above wrist. It pulled the skin down tight against the bone. I was lucky the very small brad head didn't pull through the skin. I got out some diagonal side cutting pliers and pulled the sucker out. Worked a 12 hour day after the mishap. Didn't really start to hurt until it started swelling a bit once I knocked off and headed home.
Be careful out there.

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Last week while building a storage shed in the back yard, I put a 2 1/2 inch 15 gauge finishing nail about 3/4 inch into the fleshy part of my left thumb. It ran the length of the thumb because I was holding the board about 5 inches below the nailer. Holding the trigger down and letting if fire 3 or 4 nails the end of the gun projected off the board edge on the last firing. Still on the board enough to hold down the safety interlock it shot the last nail to where I was holding the board. Have a new appreciation of the nailer now and will be more careful in the future as you all should be. Just pulled it out wrapped in in a klenex to absorb the blood and went back to work. Didn't actually hurt too bad then but still throbs a little now a week later
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JMWEBER987) wrote:

Good thing you didn't do like this guy did...
http://www.boston.com/news/daily/02/carpenter.htm
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Hope you guys shooting yourselves with nail guns are getting your tetanus shots.
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Mike Reed wrote:

http://www.thisisnorthscotland.co.uk/displayNode.jsp?nodeId 9475&command=displayContent&sourceNode9205&contentPK983748 Socialized medicine, ain't it wonderful:-( Joe
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I wondered how long is was going to take for someone to notice the real story here.

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Not the "real story"--similar thing happened to me, right here in the good ol' USofA: last year I took a chunk out of my thumb on the TS, right down to the bone. Took the on-call plastic surgeon nearly 8 hours to get to me. I left the ER 10 hrs. after entering, about $3500 lighter. Granted 10 hrs. is not 22, but don't blame socialized medicine. It's called triage, and shift change. Ask someone who works in a hospital. When you pay that much for something, you'd think you'd get better service.
Dan
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Hillary would be proud.

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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 07:19:28 -0400, Joe Gorman

Two years ago, while trying to nail some 2X4s together for pads after a concrete pour at my friend's place, I drove a 3" spike in between my left thumb and forefinger instead of the 2X4. Luckily, it did not hit any bone. I immediately and unconsciously pulled it out. Someone drove me to the hospital. I presented my Yukon medicare card and they quickly filled out a form where most of the questions were about what happened. A doctor saw me within 15 minutes, checked it out, gave me tetanus shot and I was on my way home after about half an hour. Socialized medicine, ain't it wonderful :-). Of course, it did not make the news.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Send that team to Scotland to teach them the right way to do things, and maybe a few ER's down here tooo. Joe
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 07:19:28 -0400, Joe Gorman

You bet.
Friend of mine in Wales stuck a sewing machine (the pointy bit) through his finger. At the hospital A&E (ER), he was seen immediately - it counts as an "open fracture", and is thus treated seriously. On inspection it hadn't damaged the bone and so was a truly minor injury, but you couldn't fault the NHS' service.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Yes, the worst cases get published and statistics massaged to mean whatever the writer wants, good or bad. It's nice toknow I'll have a better than even chance of good service. Joe
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On 20 Sep 2004 12:38:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Mike Reed) wrote:

In Scottish/British usage, what exactly is a joiner? I am guessing that he is a finish (trim) carpenter rather than a cabinet maker or furniture builder, but that is really only a guess. Anyone know for sure (maybe someone who actually lives in Scotland?)
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 11:09:06 -0700, Tim Douglass

Good question - historical or contemporary ?
In contemporary usage, they could be anything (we're lax here). Typically they're what the US would describe as "trim carpenters".
Historically is more interesting. Chests used to be called "arks" and were made by arkwrights - still an extant surname. Later developments went from the hollowed out log, the six-board chest and the clamp-fronted ark, all as attempts to deal with the shrinkage of timber with moisture content.
A much later development (imported from Europe) was the frame-and-panel chest; the typical M&T frame with the free floating panel that we still use today. This great new innovation was the secret of a new trade - the "joiners", where only they and not mere arkwrights knew the mysteries of this new craft. Displaced from furniture, the arkwrights became rough carpenters of farm equipment and later for machinery frames.
The terms "cabinetry" and "cabinetmaker" really belong to the 18th century, and the developments of veneering and finishing.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 00:18:14 +0100, Andy Dingley

Thanks, that's what I thought/suspected. The rest is interesting, but *way* more information than I really need right now. I'll store it until I can casually work it into a conversation sometime!
Tim

Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Yeah, my comentary on the article is sarcastic. I don't imagine he's using a nailer to build jewelry boxes or anything :)
(Mike Reed)

>http://www.thisisnorthscotland.co.uk/displayNode.jsp?nodeId 9475&command=displayContent&sourceNode9205&contentPK983748
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