Why 60 volt on a 240 volt circuit?

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Tom Veatch wrote in
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Our dining room "over the table" ficture was purchased in Holland. US bulbs work fine, especally after we wired the fixture into the ceiling box.
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Han
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Tom Veatch wrote:

European lamps operate on a 240 single phase arrangement , might not be suitable for your 220/240 volt twin phase supply
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steve robinson wrote:

220/240 volts in the US is most commonly single phase as well.
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Jack Novak
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Nova wrote:

in the uk we have only 1 live wire(hot wire) you run 2 in the states?
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steve robinson wrote:

Yes, but it's still the same phase...and a bulb won't care being simply a resistive load.
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steve robinson wrote:

Think 240 volts coming from a center tapped transformer. Across the two hot wires is 240 volts. From either hot wire to the center tap is 120 volts. Most codes in US require the center tap (which is called neutral) to be bonded to ground at the service panel entering the residence. It is still single phase. Actual two-phase service was an entirely different animal way back in the past history of Alternating Current, and is not found outside of a very few museums that show how it was used.
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On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 14:22:05 -0500, Tom Veatch wrote:

When I converted my lathe to 220v, I plugged in the light and my drills to the same power strip that the lathe used to be plugged into.. Just lazy, I guess..
mac
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Couldn't a guy just stick a one or two amp 400PRV diode in series with the hot lamp lead? That way you'd get only half of the sine wave. I seem to remember that "they" used to sell a diode packaged so it would drop into the light socket "to make your bulbs last forever".
Pete Stanaitis ------------
Tom Veatch wrote:
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On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 07:47:48 -0800, mac davis

Yeah, I should have thought that one through.. I meant to say put a load on it, and the closest thing is a lamp. For 110V, that would have worked OK. I've never seen a 220 lamp here in the US.
-dickm
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Somebody wrote:

They are available.
A little story.
American Shipbuilding in Lorain, Oh, would run bare stringer lights down thru the ship they were working on for light.
To keep the theft to a minimum, they used 240V, incandescent lamps, which totally pissed off the workers so as a diversion, they would throw stones at the lamps to break them during lunch hour.
Had at least 2 guys whose job was to replace broken lamps on a full time basis.
A/S/B had a contract with my distributor to buy at least 25,000 lamps/year for replacements.
American Ship Building was closed years ago by owner George Steinbrenner as a result of a labor dispute.
Lew
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wrote:

Absolutely!
The reason I brought up the tiny voltages and autoranging is simply because I've seen it many times on unpowered (breaker open) circuits.
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Fine -- is there actually power to the circuit? Is the breaker on?
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 22:08:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Or, in the case of my last couple of houses, are the breakerS on... The dryer circuit in my garage in the States has TWO 40 amp breakers ganged with a bar on the switch end of the breaker, but the older house had 2 breakers that weren't ganged... I guess you could only throw one breaker and have one 110v leg on??
mac
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"Trent" wrote in message

Is that circuit on a separate breaker from the other 220 receptacles?
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Have you taken the circuit apart and looked at your wiring yet?
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-Mike-
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Trent wrote:

Check your wiring in the outlet are correct and tight , make sure you havent wired anythin in series within the circuit ,
Check for any possible earth leakage running to ground
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Trent wrote:

A series circuit would produce 120 volts from the leg to ground. To check for a true reading of 240 volts, you need to test from leg to leg. For 220 or 240, a test from the leg to ground can float a variable reading. Also a loose neutral wire can produce a low voltage from leg to ground. This is why we are to read from leg to leg on a 240 volt circuit, this is the true voltage.
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in my experience, this can happen when the either the neutral wire in a 120 volt circuit or the 2nd leg of a 240 volt circuit is missing. If so, you'd probably get the same result if you didn't stick the neutral probe of the meter into the receptacle at all. Personally, I use a simple neon tester to figure these things out so I don't get confused by a digital meter.
Pete Stanaitis ------------------------
Trent wrote:

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"spaco" wrote

That's why I asked the question I did.
If he using a panel/sub panel that will take 1/2 height breakers, he may not be spanning both _legs_ with the 220 c'brk. IME, the 'position of the circuit breaker is important/necessary in these type panels when installing 220 breakers.
A WAG, but the fact the he took the time to use a voltage meter indicates to me that he tried to plug something into the receptacle and it didn't work, so out came voltage tester. The above scenario is not uncommon, even among some electricians I know.
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It does make sense that if you split 220-240VAC in series you'll get 50-60VAC on each one. I'm guessing since you haven't mentioned blowing a breaker there isn't a direct short or shunt someplace.
Is the end of the circuit terminated correctly??
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