Whiteside router bits--does size really matter?

Page 1 of 2  

Okay, you can call me anal, but what would you guys consider acceptable tolerance between a router bit's stated cutting diameter and its actual cutting diameter?
I just bought a Whiteside spiral upcut bit, a 1/2" shank with a 1/2" cutting diameter. This would normally have been a $50 bit, but all Whitesides are 15% off at Hartville Tool through the end of the month.
Pretty little &^%$er, she is, all bright and shiny with her razor-sharp curves ready to tear at a man's heart...
So I chuck 'er up (collet 'er up?), and rout a nice little test mortise. Only to find out...she's undersized by .006. That's right...she's .494, not .500. My Starrett dial calipers say so, and they cost a whole lot more than the bit, so I gotta believe them, you know?
I know this is wood, and not metal, and I'm not performing brain surgery with the bit. But I would have thought, especially for Whiteside, that it would have been out by, at most, about +/- .002 or so.
Any thoughts?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go to http://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/ and click on CONTACT US. They will answer in a couple of days.
Frank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Considering that is less than 1/128" - I wouldn't concern myself. The wood will change size more than that daily. IMHO, in woodworking - about 1/16" is within tolerance.
Just MHO -

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Horseshit. Ever try to fit a 3/4" shelf into a 11/16" dado?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nope - I'm not that dumb. Also, I make my dados match the shelf.
You won't have that problem if you cut more accurately.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So, within a 1/16" isn't close enough. Which is it? You really should stick with one story.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nope - you should learn to read, nerd.
PLONK!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Seriously, what are you going to fit into a 1/2" grove? Not plywood. If you do find something or cut something to exactly 1/2" to fit into the grove simply sand the edges that go in a touch and it'll go right in. Plus, try milling 20 or 30 feet and then remeasure. You will probably find that it is even smaller.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More important, consider that after you rout the first inch or so that bit will have expanded say ... .006 from the heat, and we all know that you can trim a tight tenon easier than you can add to a loose one.
Worry about the bit when you can cut your tenons to .006 tolerance.
Oh yes, put the goddamn Starrett in the drawer and learn to use a rule or tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

What type of wood did you use for the test? For .006 I'm wondering if the wood compressed while routing and then expanded once the bit passed.
Try mic'ing the bit.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
He did. Read it again.
of wood did you use for the test? For .006 I'm wondering if

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW wrote:

I read it again:
"So I chuck 'er up (collet 'er up?), and rout a nice little test mortise. Only to find out...she's undersized by .006. That's right...she's .494, not .500. My Starrett dial calipers say so,"
I read it as he measured the mortise.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
no(SPAM)vasys wrote:

And the winner...in this corner...wearing the...well who cares?...is...
Jack Novak
The OP mic'd the mortise; not the bit.
dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You're anal.
I have several bits, some high-end, and the shafts measure all over the place .006. I have one bit which requires me to drive a steel wedge into a collet gap to open it up enough for it go in. That's a $285.00 insert bit. My experience has been that they're all over the map.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bought a spiral bit from MLCS to use with my existing box joint jig. The craftsman straight bit gave too much tear out. With the MLCS bit my joints didn't fit. Turns out the craftsman bit was 0.500, and the MLCS was 0.485. I complained to MLCS and they told me to return it for credit less a handling charge, since a 0.015 error was within tolerances. I never bought from MLCS; I wish they would stop sending me their catalogs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For spiral bits, buy aluminum cutting end mills. Work great, are often cheaper and have a size tolerence of +0 -.001.

The
within
catalogs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not to mention that they stay sharper and hold up better than carbide tipped. I was plunge cutting 3/8" wide, 3/8" deep and 1/5" long slots through 3/8" thick Ipe typically 200 at a time. After 400 cuts the carbide bits were toast. After 600 the end mill bits still looked and cut like brand new compared to the carbide bit. I was using 4 flute HSS end mill bits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Sounds like a good idea...thanks you guys.
I must say, though, I'm unfamiliar with what an end mill actually is. It sounds like something more suited for drill press speeds, am I correct? (I don't want to end up like the guy that put a rosette cutter on his router, then through his aorta...)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

No.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Jan 2006 07:31:54 -0800, wood_newbie wrote:

An end mill is what machinists use to make money cutting things to size and shape.
Try this link to get a mental picture of the various shapes.
http://www.unionbutterfield.com/tech/amg/hss_end_mill_amg.asp
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.