Which wood is in, which wood is out?

Page 2 of 3  
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) writes:

[...]
In http://biodiversity.uno.edu/delta/wood/en/www/rospravi.htm both (Prunus avium and Prunus serotina) are listed as cherry, the difference being the distribiution P. avium in europe, P. serotina in northern america. Do the P. serotina trees produce edible/delicius fruit? With regard to the original question of the color theyΉ say: "Heartwood basically brown to red to yellow to white or grey.", i.o.w. many possibilities, so color doesn't tell...
Ή)H. G. Richter and M. J. Dallwitz (2000 onwards). Commercial timbers: descriptions, illustrations, identification, and information retrieval. In English, French, German, and Spanish. Version: 18th October 2002. http://biodiversity.uno.edu/delta /
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

+ + + Let's be real esoteric and refer to Holz aktuell, Heft 5/1985 p7-35
The fruit universally known as cherry is from Prunus avium (with some Prunus cerasus thrown in).
The wood sold as cherry is almost all Prunus serotina. Why? Because you just can't get the wood of Prunus avium (beyond the occasional tree here and there). Prunus avium is grown for the fruit and these days that means little trees (with no merchantable wood), while Prunus serotina is grown only for the wood. However the reputation of cherry as a timber (including the famous "cherry stain") was made by Prunus avium.
With both the fruit known as "cherry" and the reputation as a timber coming from Prunus avium there is no doubt in my mind as to what is the real cherry.
As to why a tree does not become a "cherry" by calling it Black cherry and abbreviating it, may I suggest looking at Australia's She Oak, Silk Oak and Tasmanian Oak, none of which are oaks. Lets not get into the mahoganies, with Philippine mahogany, Burma mahogany, etc. PvR
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Or "tulip-poplar," which is neither a tulip nor a poplar.
P. serotina produces an astringent fruit only a bird could love. With some sweet, makes a strong-flavored jelly or a tasty wine/cordial.
schreef

and
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15 Nov 2003 09:12:38 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) brought forth from the murky depths:

I call it "reddish brown shit", or RBS for short.

It's plum purty, that's what it is.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - If God approved of nudity, we all would have been born naked. ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- http://www.diversify.com Your Wild & Woody Website Wonk
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I
10
last
As a building contractor, I do quite a bit of residential. I usually do my own trim. People aren't necessarily so finiky as to the wood type but more on the color. Infact if "cherry" is in, the client is usually looking for that "showroom" cherry color. Here in Oregon, cherry is fairly spendy. If the customer is more concerned about the color than the wood, we will typically stain hemlock to that "showroom cherry" color. But me? I'm like you. I like walnut now. And I'll still like walnut in 10 years. But it does look real nice with maple accents ;-) SH
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I couldn't agree more!

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David P wrote:

Me three. I'm doing a chess box in walnut/maple as we speak. I'm glad I got talked out of using birch for this. (Thanks JOAT!)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.stratus.com says...

Thought that one was because good taste finally got the upper hand. :-)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
good question. MY dream kitchen of oak is now under re-evaluation. perhaps cherry or maple would be a better choice. What say the pundits?
dave
David P wrote:

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bay Area Dave wrote:

Who gives a rip what the pundits think? <g> What do YOU like?
In my house it's a challenge. SWMBO likes light colors; I dream of heavy, dark, elegant built-in bookcases.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like oak, but I think I'm getting a bit tired of it and in the spirit of the OP's question, I too, wonder if a certain wood is in. Look at all the homes with black granite countertops now. Look at the cherry raised panel doors without arches. Stainless appliances. That's the trend.
I wasn't asking the question to have someone tell me what I, personally should put in. I'll put in whatever I finally decide to!
Hey, I'm the guy who got a Unisaw when the vote was for the Powermatic.
dave
Mark Jerde wrote:

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Jerde wrote:

Me too. She's so golden oak, and I'm so black walnut.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave,
Just been thru all this with my sister-in-law and niece - both remodeling kitchens and I'm been doing the cabinet doors and building some French doors and bay window cabinets.
None of those woods in your list are out of style but each wood does fit better with a particular cabinet style. If it were French country, the cherry fits nicely, traditional then maple and oak for classic country. Just some examples...there's plenty more. It's probably the stain color that dates cabinetry more than any other factor - not the wood type.
Bob S.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cherry in, plain sawn oak out!

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been hearing more and more about sassafras.
--
McQualude

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bay Area Dave wrote:

I like oak for a variety of reasons, but on something like kitchen cabinets that are going to be in the same place for years, the strong grain patterns in oak seem a bit overpowering. We still have some good oak furniture that we intend to keep for a long time, but it isn't as in your face as a wall of kitchen cabinets. IMHO oak makes great accent pieces.
Maple and cherry both have mild enough grain patterns that they don't stand there and shout what kind of wood they are for the next few decades.
If you are going to leave the wood it's natural color, it's important that you consider what color schemes you like and are likely to want to use in the future.
In the end, whatever wood that lights your candle is the right one for you.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's been that way for many years. Like a race between oak, cherry, and maple. I find better wood buys in oak and maple because cherry is "in" right now. I really don't know why, but all three are good woods to make furniture. It's beyond me why so many people got to have SUVs and cell phones. Fads?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman wrote:

I live in the Washington D.C. area, and as a rule, winters are much milder than those of my South Dakota upbringing.
After a snowstorm I walked down to the supermarket about a block from our house. The parking lot was about 1/4 filled with vehicles -- every last stinking one of them a SUV. I had a good laugh when I saw it. I could almost hear the conversations before each vehicle's hazardous trek: "Margo, we paid $$$ for our four-wheel drive. By gum, I'm going to DRIVE to the market and get that jar of salad dressing!"
Novii!
-- Mark
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mark Jerde" writes:

Same experience. Westover Shopping Center by any chance?
Marc, whose SUV is a 1990 Isuzu Trooper.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Or as they used to say to us - an instrument rating doesn't mean you have to fly in bad weather.

"Margo,
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.