which type of pine?


Hello,
My friend has a chest on chest, made of pine, which he wants me to copy. I don't know whether it's white or yellow. I can tell you where or when it was made. About the only helpful thing I can say is that there are no knots visible on the piece. I know that's not much to go on, but it's all I have. I'll get a local expert to look at it, but in the meantime, can anyone offer a suggestion?
Curt Blood Amateur Furniture Maker
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Try a "finger nail" test... white pine is quite soft while SYP is NOT.
dustyone wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

New fast-growth syp isn't nearly as hard as the old-growth we all came to know...
For a furniture piece it's almost certainly not yellow pine.

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You never know...depends on the age of the piece.
Even the old timers did not care for syp,but they would use it in "utility" cases and cabinets. Quarter sawn yellow pine is still available from certain vendors. The brit crowd tends to love our "yaller pine".
Clear 8/4 for $2.50 is a deal....
http://www.walllumber.com/soft.asp
Might not be pretty but it will be the toughest piece of furniture in the house.
Duane Bozarth wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

{re: SYP as furniture wood...)

... Still far less likely as the prime specie, I'm thinkin...
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Please note, the singular of species is "species"; specie is a substitute for money.
Steve

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Steve Peterson wrote:

Oh, FO...
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My sentiments exactly.

substitute
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You're going to want to start your search for a couple of good sources of reclaimed pine. What you can easily buy today is not nearly the furniture wood that was available 50 to 150 years ago.
Look for tight, straight grain, and you can make some nice repro pieces.
Patriarch
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Hello,
My friend has a chest on chest, made of pine, which he wants me to copy. I don't know whether it's white or yellow. I can tell you where or when it was made. About the only helpful thing I can say is that there are no knots visible on the piece. I know that's not much to go on, but it's all I have. I'll get a local expert to look at it, but in the meantime, can anyone offer a suggestion?
Three types in the lumber lexicon - white, red, and yellow. Yellow and red pines have pronounced annual rings, white doesn't. Red and yellow stain strangely, giving a color reversal, tend to have a higher resin content, and are more prone to splintering than white, especially Pinus strobus, the eastern white. None of those three qualities recommend them for furniture-making.
If you have subdued annual rings, it's white. Best of the three anyway.
Search for lumber sellers' sites and you'll have all the pictures you want.
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red
and
want.
Which would you class radiata, besides kindling?
- Andy
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Turns OK.
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I'll give it that, I've a young lad with a degenerative hip disease that I'm teaching to turn although I'm barely one step ahead. I started him off with radiata 'cos it's both cheap and not easy to get a good finish on w/out learning tool control.
But I'm sick of the sight of it, it's everywhere. People want timber in their homes w/out paying big money so I'm installing pine ship-lap, jambs, picture-rails, you name it. I've always disliked framing my cheaper cabinets with it and now I'm being asked to make entire kitchens out of nothing else, including the furniture! Worse, they don't want it stained, just lacquered! At the end of the day there's no job-satisfaction.; I step back from a job and see cheap, tacky, coarse-grained... [shudder]
Sorry. I'm feeling better now that I've let it out. Until I start work tomorrow, anyway. [sigh]
But I was serious about asking what "colour" pine radiata is classed as. It can range from chalk-white to a cheddar-cheese yellow, often in the same board, so I'm curious.
- Andy (expert Woodsmith: hammering timber to fit since 1970)
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It
I'm in the middle, not left, so I don't know how the timbermen there classify it. It appears more a "red" in characteristics, but common-naming has no firm rules. Or maybe it's so seldom harvested for wood that it's thrown on any stack.
"Monterey pine wood is light, soft, and coarse grained [35,43]. It is of little commercial value in the United States except as fuelwood [35]. In other parts of the world it is used for general construction, flooring, furniture, joinery, plywood, reconstituted panel products, and paper. " http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/pinrad/all.html
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[---8<---]
common-naming
Normally thrown on the firewood stack, eh? Even that's too good for it, 'tis too resinous and burns too quickly. Great kindling though
To be honest, the naturally grown trees give some decent timber; old pine flooring & ship-lap (100+ yo) is fairly tight grained and quite attractive. Plantation timber can be measured by knots per ft^2 with extremely coarse grain and I'm sure you can guess which is most prevalent here. [sigh]

Hmmm... thats a handy URL. My reference list grows longer! :) Thank you.
- Andy
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