What would you do?

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Other than going out and buying an 8" jointer, how would you surface plane a 7" piece of rough sawn cherry on a 6 1/8" jointer? I really don't want to have to rip it, face it, joint it, then glue it back together. Also, it's just one board and I don't have a hand plane, and don't really want one. Would that 7/8" effect anything when I turned it and ran it through the second time? I know this is probably a lame question, but it's a good looking piece of wood, and I don't want to screw it up. Everything else I've done has been narrow enough to fit ok. TIA
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The 7/8"? I doubt you would be able to get the board past the guard. Straighten the board on a TS riding on a jig. You may end up with a board that will fit your jointer after trimming the edges. If you were able to run the 7" wide board through the jointer and then flipped it to work the 7/8" piece, you will have to keep the rest of the 6 1/8" of the board off the table surface, not likely to happen.
I would rip it, flatten it, straighten the 2 mating edges and glue it back together.
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else to confirm it.
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Tim Taylor wrote:

You could build a sled for you planer and run it through. FWW had a nice article on how to build the sled. Another method is to make a small rabbit on both edges, large enough to leave 6" or less in the middle. then take off the guard and the fence of you jointer and run this 6" middle section until it is flat, then using this flat as a reference run it through your planer until the opposite side is good, then flip the board and plane until the rabbits disappear.
Another way is to check with any local woodworking shops and see if they'd let you buy time on one of their machines.
You may also want to rethink not wanting a handplane. Often using handtools in conjunction with your power tools is the quickest and most efficient manner of working. But be forewarned if you do get the handplane it might be the first step into neanderdom.
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I'm pretty new at this, but the sled for the planer seems like a great idea. What would I've purchased has more often than not been bigger than my 6" jointer. And even had I purchased that fancy 8" jointer, I've already encountered 9" wood that wouldnt fit that. I would hazard guess that almost all home woodworkers are without a jointer large enough for all their needs. My planer on the other hand is 13.5" wide and would probably cover 90% of my needs. It also feels alot safer than my jointer when running full faces of wood. I really want to try this jig out and see how well it works.
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figure out when breakfast is compared to supper, much less be around to get to a shop that would have one. Nice suggestion though. Uhhhh I aint real sure about this whole neander way of life. It good for those who like it, and I got nothing against it. I just like my machines.
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planing them on the jointer. The exceptions would those that are badly twisted or bowed, or those that must be perfect for dovetailing or whatever. The place I buy my lumber puts out a pretty flat product.
Don't know enough about your board to say if it fits that or not.
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run it through the planer and go on with it. But this piece is just a might cupped to do that I'm thinking.
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the cupped piece to the sled, plane and flatten one side, remove from sled and flip it over then plane the other side.
Dave
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Tim Taylor wrote:

Make friends with someone with an 8" jointer or farm out to a shop that has one. Where are you located?
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Well that's a thought. I might put an ad in the paper to see if anybody with a killer shop needs a buddy! :-) Seriously though, I know they're out there, the big machines that is, but it's just finding them. Normally guys come to me wanting to use my machines cause their Craftsman whatever just won't do the job. BTW I'm in Ky.
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Tim Taylor wrote:

Sandah, straightedge, chalk.
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you guys are great! Sander I got, and it's got a cord, so that just might be doable. Thanks Frisco!!
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Tim Taylor wrote:

My shop time is very limited. I seldom take the time to use the jointer to flatten the face of the board anymore. Most boards can be run through the planer only and be flat enough. If you're board is reasonably flat, just put it through the planer only.
I save the boards that need the jointer (bad cup, twist, etc) for when I need small pieces and then joint them. When I first started, I foolishly spent a lot of time trying to flatten a 6-8 foot long board all at once (when I had other boards on the pile I could've used).
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pretty special piece and I think it's cupped a might much to just plane it.
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http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?sku=7 or Ask a friend, where do you live?
Dave
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Dave, that's sure a pretty tool, but where's the cord? How do you turn it on??? LOL Seriously, if I started with one hand tool, I'd probably have to have another, then another. Like an addict you know. I "had" thought about it though, but never inhaled! :-) I'm in Ky.
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"Tim Taylor"

woodworker. I have all the power tools I need to build most anything and still find myself reaching for the plane all the time. But you are right - it is an addiction - and we are the support group and the enablers all in one easy to meet place! LOL
Dave
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Kelly Mehler's suggestion: Use a scrub plane. You can knock down the high spots until it's reasonably flat. Then run the board, scrubbed side down, through the thickness planer. That will give you a flat, level surface ---- and go from there.
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Well I've read the replies but haven't seen the correct answer yet :) so I'll chime in:
1) Rabbet one edge of the board with the TS, jointer, or router. The rabbet should extend 1" along the face of the board, and be just a touch deeper than you expect to have to face joint off: ---------------------|___ |     | --------------------------
2) Face joint the protruding 6" width of the board on the jointer. You may need to remove the safety guard.
3) You now have a face jointed board, with a miniscule rabbet. Throw it on the planer to get the other side planar, then flip it over and feed it through the planer one more time to clean off the rabbet. Your board is now jointed, thicknessed, and coplanar.
Kelly
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